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Full text of "University of New Haven Undergraduate Catalog, 1975-76"

AC 30 

1975/76 

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University of New Haven 
Undergraduate Catalog 

1975-1976 



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Academic Calendar 6 

General Information 7 

Admission 10 

Scholastic Regulations 

Tuition, Fees and Expenses 

Student Activities and Facilities 

Academic Programs 

School of Arts and Sciences 

School of Business Administration 

School of Engineering 

Description of Courses 

The Board of Governors 

Administration 

Advisory Councils 160 

Faculty 169 

Index 173 

Map 178 



13 


TABLE 


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OF 


25 


CONTENTS 


37 




59 




81 




95 




153 




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HISTORY 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



University of New Haven is the new name of an institution which for 
half a century prior to 1970 was known as New Haven College. Founded 
in 1920 by the Y.M.C.A. as a branch of Northeastern University, its 
early years were inconspicuous and its growth was slow. But it served 
a desperate need, functioning as a community college to provide an 
education for many who could not afford the time or tuition demanded 
by regular four-year colleges and universities. New Haven College had 
then, as the University of New Haven has now. a strong sense of 
responsibility to the community. 

In 1926 the college was incorporated by an act of the Connecticut 
General Assembly and was authorized to grant the Associate in Science 
degree. At the same time an agreement was reached with Yale for the 
use of its classrooms and laboratories during evening hours, augment- 
mg cramped and inadequate quarters. With the use of the Yale facilities 
the College was able to build a sound educational program in coopera- 
tion with local business and industry. 

From 1941 to 1945 New Haven College administered the Official Yale 
University Engineering, Science, Management, and War Training 
Programs for New Haven County. In 1948 the College took a signifi- 
cant step forward with accreditation of its Associate in Science degree 
program by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. 



During the next decade several new programs were inaugurated. 
These were The Reading Center, The Division of Special Studies, and 
the School of Executive Development — now the Management Center. 
Two daytime programs for recent high school graduates were instituted: 
Industrial Administration, and Industrial Engineering. 

In 1958 New Haven College was authorized by the Connecticut 
General Assembly to offer courses of study leading to the Bachelor of 
Science degree to both day and evening students. In 1960 the College 
acquired the present West Haven Campus and entered upon a decade of 
rapid growth. Programs for full-time students were introduced and new 
courses were made available in other credit and non-credit curricula. 
The acquisition of 28 acres of undeveloped land near the main campus 
in 1962 made possible construction of playing fields, tennis courts, and 
a new Physical Education-Auditorium Building. In October 1974, the 
new Marvin K. Peterson Library was completed at a cost of $1.8 million. 



The College received full accreditation in 1966 when the New England 
Association of Schools and Colleges accredited its baccalaureate pro- 
grams. Full accreditation enabled the College to work more effec- 
tively towards the achievement of its principal objectives: to provide 
leaders and professional personnel with an understanding of important 
cultural and scientific progress and to encourage students to reach the 
maximum of their potential. 

A new and major addition to the College came in 1969 when the 
Graduate School was established with programs offered initially in 
Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. The Graduate 
School expanded rapidly, adding new programs and increasing its en- 
rollment to the present level of more than 1,000 students. 



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In October, 1970, the Board of Governors of New Haven College voted 
to change the name of the institution to the University of New Haven 
and this action was subsequently approved by the State of Connecticut. 




CALENDAR 



Summer Session 1975 



Registration period 
Tuition due on or before 
Classes begin 
Holiday (Independence Day) 
First term final examinations 
Second term classes begin 
Second term final examinations 



Fall 



'Tuition due — all students 
Residence charges due 
Holiday (Labor Day) 
Orientation — first year students 
Classes begin 
Last day to ADD courses 
MID SEMESTER 

Last day to DROP courses 
Registration for spring (No classes) 
Holiday (Thanksgiving) 
Classes end 
Final examinations 
Last day of semester 
Commencement 



Spring 



•Tuition due — all students 
Residence charges due 
Orientation — new students 
Classes begin 
Last day to ADD courses 
Holiday (Washington's Birthday) 
MID SEMESTER 

Last day to DROP courses 
Spring vacation 
Classes resume 

Registration for fall (No classes) 
Holiday (Good Friday) 
Classes end 
Final examinations 
Last day of semester 
Commencement 



Registration period 
Tuition due on or before 
Classes begin 
Holiday (Independence Day) 
First term final examinations 
Second term classes begin 
Second term final examinations 



Tuesday-Tuesday 


May 27-June 10 


Tuesday 


June 10 


Thursday 


June 12 


Friday 


July 4 


Thursday 


July 17 


Monday 


July 21 


Monday 


August 25 


Semester 1975 




Monday 


August 11 


Monday 


August 11 


Monday 


September 1 


Tuesday 


September 2 


Wednesday 


September 3 


Friday 


September 12 


Friday 


October 24 


Tuesday-Wednesday 


November 18-19 


Thursday-Friday 


November 27-28 


Tuesday 


December 16 


Wednesday-Saturday 


December 17-20 


Saturday 


December 20 


Sunday 


January 25, 1976 


: Semester 1976 




Monday 


January 5 


Monday 


January 5 


Thursday 


January 15 


Friday 


January 16 


Friday 


January 23 


Monday 


February 16 


Friday 


March 5 


Saturday-Sunday 


March 13-21 


Monday 


March 22 


Tuesday-Wednesday 


April 13-14 


Friday 


April 16 


Wednesday 


May 5 


Thursday-Wednesday 


May 6-12 


Wednesday 


May 12 


Sunday 


June 6 


ir Session 1976 




Tuesday-Friday 


May 25-June 11 


Friday 


June 11 


Monday 


June 14 


Monday 


July 4 


Tuesday 


July 20 


Thursday 


July 22 


Thursday 


August 26 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



'Students admitted after August 11 (fall semester) or January 5 (spring semester) must 
register and pay tuition within ten days of Admission and in no case later than the opening 
day of classes. 



The University of New Haven has three administrative divisions: The 
undergraduate Schools of Arts and Sciences, Engineering and Business 
Administration; the Division of Continuing Education; and the Graduate 
School. Included in the Division of Continuing Education are the Even- 
ing Division, the Extension Programs, the Summer School, the Division 
of Special Studies, and the Intersession Program. All divisions of the 
University are coeducational. 

The three undergraduate Schools offer programs leading to a four-year 
baccalaureate degree and a tw/o-year associate degree. 

Students pursuing a course of study leading to a Bachelor of Science 
degree in Business Administration may elect a major in Accounting; 
Business Administration; Communications; Criminal Justice; Eco- 
nomics; Finance; Hotel, Restaurant, Institutional Management, Tourism 
and Travel; International Business; Management Science; Operations 
Management (including Computer Concentration); Marketing; Person- 
nel Management; Public Administration; or Retailing. 

Students pursuing a course of study leading to a Bachelor of Science 
degree in Engineering may elect a program in Civil, Electrical, Indus- 
trial, Materials or Mechanical Engineering. 

A Bachelor of Computer Technology program is available in the School 
of Engineering. 



DIVISIONS 

OF THE UNIVERSITY 

UNDERGRADUATE 
PROGRAMS 



Students pursuing a course of study leading to a Bachelor of Arts 
degree may elect a major in Art, Biology, Chemistry, Economics, 
English, Environmental Studies, History, Mathematics, World Music, 
Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, and 
Social Welfare. A Bachelor of Science degree program may be followed 
by students majoring in Biology, Chemistry, Fire Science, Occupational 
Safety and Health, and Physics. A student may also elect to pursue 
an interdisciplinary course of study leading to a Bachelor of Arts de- 
gree in American Studies or Anthropology. 

An Associate in Science degree may be obtained in Aeronautical Tech- 
nology, Business Administration, Engineering, Engineering Science, 
Hotel Administration, Correctional Administration, Law Enforcement 
Administration, Forensic Science or Retailing. 

Students pursuing a course of study leading to an Associate in Science 
degree in Arts and Sciences may elect a major in Biology, Chemistry, 
General Studies, Commercial and Advertising Art, Occupational Safety 
and Health, or Journalism. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



EVENING PROGRAMS 



8 



GRADUATE 
SCHOOL 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Evening The Evening Division offers programs leading to the degrees 
of Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Industrial Tech- 
nology, and Associate in Science. 

A Bachelor of Science degree is offered in Business Administration with 
majors in Accounting; Communications; Criminal Justice; Economics; 
Finance; Hotel, Restaurant, Institutional Management, Tourism and 
Travel; International Business; Management; Operations Management 
(including Computer Concentration); Marketing; Personnel Manage- 
ment; Public Administration; and Retailing. Criminal Justice majors 
are Law Enforcement Administration, Forensic Science, and Correc- 
tional Administration. 

A Bachelor of Science degree is offered in Engineering with majors in 
Civil, Electrical, Industrial, Materials, and Mechanical Engineering. 

The School of Arts and Sciences offers the Bachelor of Science degree 
in Biology, Chemistry, Fire Science Administration, Fire Science Tech- 
nology, and Occupational Safety and Health. 

The Bachelor of Computer Technology degree is offered in the School 
of Engineering. 

A Bachelor of Arts degree is offered in the following areas: Art, Biology, 
Chemistry, Economics, English, Environmental Studies, History, Mathe- 
matics, World Music, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychol- 
ogy, Sociology, and Social Welfare. 

An Associate in Science degree is offered in the following areas: Gen- 
eral Studies, Business Administration, Correctional Administration, 
Hotel Administration, Law Enforcement, Retailing, Engineering, Engin- 
eering Science, and Occupational Safety and Health. 

For further information regarding the Evening Division, see the 
Continuing Education Bulletin which may be obtained at the University 
or write to the Director of Continuing Education. 

The Graduate School currently offers degree programs in the following 
areas: Business Administration, including option programs in Account- 
ing and Hotel Management; Engineering; Industrial Engineering; En- 
vironmental Engineering; Operations Research; Computer and Informa- 
tion Science; Criminal Justice; Community Psychology; Organizational- 
Industrial Psychology; Public Administration; and an interdisciplinary 
MBA-MSIE program. 

Prospective students seeking detailed statements on any of the above 
graduate programs and an application blank should write or call: Dean 
of the Graduate School, University of New Haven, 300 Orange Avenue, 
West Haven, Conn. 06516, telephone (203) 934-6321, ext. 280 or 316. 



This Division offers a series of professional certificate courses in 
engineering, business, and general areas. They are usually designed 
to provide supplemental knowledge and skills needed in specialized 
jobs in business and industry, and do not carry academic credit. Fur- 
ther information may be obtained by requesting separate schedules 
and course folders from the Director of the Division of Special Studies. 
Courses are approved for Veterans' Benefits. A certificate is granted up- 
on successful course completion. 



DIVISION OF 
SPECIAL STUDIES 



The purpose of the Management Center is to provide educational 
opportunities for those managers and administrators in industry, busi- 
ness, and service organizations whose needs are not met in more 
conventional undergraduate or graduate programs. The overall objec- 
tive of the Center is to offer programs to help managers of maturity 
and experience meet the broader and more complex requirements of 
positions of greater responsibility in their organizations. 
Broadly speaking, the programs of the Center are designed to meet 
the needs of two different levels of management, those of 1) staff and 
line executives at upper levels, and 2) middle management adminis- 
trators. At the upper executive level the programs consist of seminars 
and workshops of varying lengths as needed. At the middle manage- 
ment level the standard format is a part-time on-campus program. In- 
plant programs are offered which meet the specific needs of an indivi- 
dual company or industry. Special programs are available on an ad hoc 
basis, either on or off campus, as required. 



MANAGEMENT 
CENTER 



The University of New Haven is a coeducational, non-sectarian, in- 
dependent institution of higher learning chartered by the Legislature of 
the State of Connecticut and fully accredited by the Connecticut State 
Department of Education. The University holds membership in the 
New England Association of Schools and Colleges, the Association of 
American Colleges, the Connecticut Conference of Independent Col- 
leges, and the College Entrance Examining Board, and is a member of 
regional and national professional organizations. 

The University of New Haven is an equal opportunity employer com- 
mitted to affirmative action. 

The New England Association of Schools and Colleges accredits schools 
and colleges in the six New England States. Membership in one of the 
six regional accrediting associations in the United States indicates that 
the school or college has been carefully evaluated and found to meet 
standards agreed upon by qualified educators. Colleges support the ef- 
forts of public school and community officials to have their secondary 
schools meet the standards of membership. 



ACCREDITATIONS & 
MEMBERSHIPS 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



ADMISSION 



Each school of the University has its own adnnission requirements 
which are defined in detail in subsequent pages of this catalog. 

In general, graduates of accredited secondary schools are eligible for 
admission. However, in special cases persons who have not completed 
their high school education may be admitted to the various divisions 
of the University of New Haven by meeting certain specified conditions. 

In the case of adults, the University is interested in evidence of 
maturity and motivation as well as in formal education as prerequisites 
for admission. 



10 



With the exception of "auditors," students wishing to take any 
course, whether or not they seek a degree, must satisfy the admission 
requirements. 

The University of New Haven welcomes the applications of students 
from all geographic areas, from public or private schools and from all 
races, economic levels and religions. 



ADVANCED 
PLACEMENT 



The University recognizes the program of Advanced Placement avail- 
able to talented high school students, operated by the College Entrance 
Examination Board. Students satisfactorily completing Advanced Place- 
ment courses in high school and the final examination prepared by the 
Educational Testing Service may be given appropriate college credit if 
their courses are similar to those offered at the University of New 
Haven. 



Advanced Placement courses are graded from 1 to 5. Credit is 
allowed where the grade earned is 3, 4 or 5. Credit may be given for a 
grade of 2 if a careful review of the test by this university determines 
acceptability. No credit will be allowed for a grade of 1. Students 
desiring to submit Advanced Placement courses for college credit 
should have all results of these courses and tests sent in with their 
application to the Admissions Office. 

The University of New Haven accepts credit by examination from the 
College Level Examination Program (CLEP). Credit is evaluated by the 
Dean of each School. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



In addition to the traditional professions such as law, medicine, 
public service, and the ministry, more and more vocations require that 
students continue their training after earning the Bachelor degree. 
Students who wish to begin training for a profession at the graduate 
level should write to the university they expect to attend and ask for 
a statement of the entrance requirements. 

Prescribed programs in the student's major area will be modified to 
meet requirements for entrance into professional programs or to meet 
the special needs of mdividual students. Such programs must be ap- 
proved in writing by the appropriate department chairman and Dean. 

A student who has independent knowledge of the content of an 
undergraduate course offered by the University may, with the approval 
of the respective department chairman and Dean, take a special credit- 
ing examination in lieu of taking the course. 

No student may take crediting examinations during the first and last 
semester in which he is enrolled. To graduate he must earn at least 
30 semester hours through regular course work. 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL 
PROGRAMS 



CREDITING 
EXAMINATIONS 



11 




GENERAL INFORMATION 



ADMISSION 

PROCEDURE 



12 



REGISTRATION 



CHANGES OF 
REGISTRATION 
& SCHEDULES 



1. Write or telephone the University for information and, if you desire, 
arrange for an interview. Telephone (area code 203) 934-6321, ext. 
211 or212. 

2. Secure an application form from the Admissions Office of the Uni- 
versity or from your high school guidance counselor. 

3. Submit the completed application form with a $15 application fee. 
This fee is not refundable. 

4. Request your secondary school and/or college to forward an aca- 
demic transcript. 

5. Submit College Board test scores (S.A.T.), or A.C.T., or arrange to 
take the University of New Haven tests. 

Degree and Non-Degree Students There are two parts to registration: 
the completion of the registration forms and the payment of tuition. 
There is a penalty fee for delaying either of these two processes beyond 
the end of the registration period. 

Registration dates and procedures for currently enrolled day students 
will be posted in advance. 

Registration procedures will be mailed to new students. New students 
must register in person. 

A separate registration is required for each of the semesters and 
for the summer sessions. 

Social Security numbers will be used on student records; students 
should be sure to bring their numbers when registering. Prospective 
students who do not have Social Security numbers should apply for 
them before registration. Students from other countries who do not 
have Social Security numbers will be given a temporary number by the 
University; however, they will be encouraged to apply for a Social Se- 
curity number as soon as possible. 

Note: Day students may register for no more than three evening 
courses. Any waiver of this regulation must be obtained from the ap- 
propriate dean. 

Students are urged to plan their programs carefully before com- 
pleting the registration forms in order to avoid the need for requesting 
changes. Once the registration is completed, the student is charged 
the Change of Registration Fee for each change he makes. The fee is 
payable when the student completes the form requesting the change. 



Grading System The following grading system is in use and except 
where otherwise specified applies both to examinations and to term 
work. The weight of a final examination grade is a matter individually 
determined by each instructor. 

A Superior 

B Good 

C Fair 

D Lowest passing grade 

F Failure or withdrawal after midpoint with unsatisfactory work 

Inc. Incomplete. 

1. The grade of Incomplete indicates that some work remains 
to be completed to gain academic credit for a course. 

2. Work to remove an Incomplete must be performed within 
twelve (12) months following the last day of the semester 
in which an incomplete is incurred. 

3. When such work is completed, the instructor will assign a 
final grade for the course. 

4. Should the student fail to complete unfulfilled academic 
assignments within twelve (12) months, the grade of W will 
be entered on the student's record. This grade will be final; 
no further opportunity to complete the course will be avail- 
able to a student after this time. 

Withdrawal. Indicates either (1) withdrawal prior to the mid- 
point of semester or (2) withdrawal after the midpoint of 
semester and work satisfactory at that time. 
Satisfactory. Given only in non-credit courses. 
Unsatisfactory. Given only in non-credit courses. 



W 



s 
u 



Full-time students must complete a minimum of 12 credits per 
semester to retain their status as full-time students. Completion is 
defined as receipt of a letter grade (A to F) as opposed to W or Incom- 
plete. 

A student may not register for more than 18 semester hours in any 
one semester without the written permission of the Dean of his school 
(19 semester hours for certain engineering programs). In most in- 
stances a student will be required to achieve a cumulative quality 
point ratio of 3.20 in order to register for more than 18 semester hours 
in any one semester. 

Grade Reports Reports of the final grade in each subject will be 
mailed to the student soon after the close of each semester. The same 
report will be mailed to employers in those instances in which the 
student has given his approval. 



SCHOLASTIC 
REGULATIONS 

GRADING SYSTEM 



13 



GRADE REPORTS 



ACADEMIC 
STANDARDS 



14 



PROBATION & 
DISMISSAL 



TRANSFER 
STUDENTS 



Academic Standards The academic standing of each student will be 
determined on the basis of his quality point ratio each semester. 

In order to determine quality point ratios, each letter grade is assigned 
a quality point value: 



A 
B 
C 
D 
F 



4 
3 
2 
1 




qual 
qual 
qual 
qual 
qual 



points 

points 

points 

point 

points 

is obtained 



by multiplying 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



The quality point ratio for all students 

the quality point value of each grade by the number of semester hours 
of the course, then dividing the total quality points by the total semes- 
ter hours. 

Students are required to maintain a quality point ratio in accordance 
with the following scale: 

Quality point ratio of 1.50 for 3-30 semester hours attempted 
of 1.60 for 31-45 semester hours attempted 
of 1.70 for 46-60 semester hours attempted 
of 1.80 for 61-75 semester hours attempted 
of 1.90 for 76-90 semester hours attempted 
of 2.00 for 91 or more semester hours attempted 

Failure to earn the required cumulative quality point ratio will place a 
student on academic probation for the following semester of enroll- 
ment. A student is automatically dismissed when he receives a third 
probation or when his quality point ratio for any one semester is less 
than 1.00. 

First-semester freshmen earning a quality point ratio less than 1.00 are 
automatically referred to the Academic Standing and Admissions Com- 
mittee which may specify conditions for continued enrollment. A record 
of Committee action shall appear on the student's permanent record. 
Committee decisions are normally viewed as final, and may be reversed 
only by the Provost or President of the University. 

Transfer Students Academic probation for transfer students is deter- 
mined in accordance with the same graduated scale as for non-transfer 
students. In determining a transfer student's academic standing, his 
total semester hours (those received at another college plus those at 
the University of New Haven) are applied to the graduated scale. How- 
ever, only the cumulative average earned at the University of New 
Haven is considered in determining the student's academic standing. 



Readmission Application for readmission after a student has been 
dismissed will normally be considered only after the lapse of a semester 
and only when the student provides evidence which indicates his prob- 
able success if readmitted. 

Unusual circumstances may permit earlier application if the student's 
Dean and Department Chairman successfully petition the Academic 
Standing and Admissions Committee to review the applicant's case. 

Requests for readmission should be submitted in writing to the Chair- 
man of the Academic Standing and Admissions Committee at least 
three weeks before the opening of the semester and should include 
evidence supporting the student's belief that he will succeed if 
readmitted. 

Readmission is not automatic. The Academic Standing and Admissions 
Committee reviews each application and recommends rejection, accept- 
ance, or conditional acceptance to the Director of Admissions. 



READMISSION 



15 



Dean's List Full-time students who earn a quality point ratio of 3.20 
or better in any one semester will be placed on the Dean's List. 

All part-time students who have accumulated a minimum of 14 
semester hours at the University will automatically be considered for 
the Dean's List at the end of each semester. A cumulative quality point 
ratio of 3.20 or better is required. 

The Baccalaureate or Associate degree will be conferred at Commence- 
ment when the student has met all the requirements of his program 
and has met the following University requirements: 

1. Has earned a cumulative quality point ratio of at least 2.00. 

2. Has been recommended by the faculty. 

3. Has met all financial obligations. 

4. Has completed the last 30 semester hours at the University of 
New Haven. 



DEAN'S LIST 



DEGREES 



Honors may be conferred upon candidates for graduation who have 
completed at least 60 semester hours of work at the University of New 
Haven in their junior and senior years. The following standards shall 
be used: 



HONORS 



1. The bachelor degree Cum Laude may be awarded to a student 
whose cumulative quality point ratio is at least 3.25 at the end of the 
first semester of his senior year and who continues to attain the same 
standard for the remainder of the year. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



BACHELOR DEGREE 
WITH HONORS 



2. The bachelor degree Magna Cum Laude may be awarded to a 
student whose cumulative quality point ratio is at least 3.50 at the end 
of the first semester of his senior year and who continues to attain the 
same standard for the remainder of the year, whose quality point ratio 
in all courses counting toward his major is at least 3.50, and who has 
completed all the suggested courses within his curriculum.. 



16 



ASSOCIATE IN 

SCIENCE DEGREE 

WITH HONORS 



3. The bachelor degree Summa Cum Laude may be awarded to a 
student whose cumulative quality point ratio is at least 3.70 at the 
end of the first semester of his senior year, who continues to attain the 
same standard for the remainder of the year, whose quality point ratio 
in all courses counting toward his major is at least 3.70, and who has 
completed all the suggested courses within his curriculum. 

A degree With Honors is awarded to students who have a quality 
point ratio of 3.25 for the semester hours specifically required for the 
degree program from which they are being graduated, and who have 
taken 30 or more hours of required work at this University. 

Transfer students will be awarded honors on the same basis, with 
the provision, however, that their total average will be considered only 
when they have an honor average for studies completed at this 
University. 



A degree With High Honors is awarded to students who have a qual- 
ity point ratio of 3.50 based on the same considerations as noted above. 



In determining eligibility for degrees with honor, credits earned by 
crediting examinations and electives in excess of those required will 
not be considered. 

ADVANCED Advanced study courses are offered for qualified students in the 

QTIinv departments offering the degree of Bachelor of Science or Bachelor 

olUUY of Arts. These courses may include a thesis, tutorial work, or in- 

dependent study which permits the students to work intensively in 
areas of special interest. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Classes are operated on the policy that it is necessary for all students 
to attend all class meetings. If a class is missed, the benefits from 
participation in the class discussion and instruction are completely 
lost. No student, regardless of ability, can afford that loss. 



ATTENDANCE 
REGULATIONS 



Evening Credit Programs A student is allowed only two absences per 
semester for a 3-or-4 semester hour course. If the student is absent 
more than twice, permission to continue in the course must be obtained 
from the instructor. 

Day Credit Programs Attendance regulations for daytime students 
are outlined in the Student Handbook. 

Requirements Transfer students may apply to the University of New 
Haven after successfully completing one or more semesters at an ac- 
credited college. The residency requirement for all University degrees 
is 30 credit hours. 

A student with a two-year degree and at least a 2.00 QPR will receive 
transfer credit for as many hours as the degree required. However, no 
more than 60 semester hours from a two-year college will be accepted, 
except by written authorization of the Dean of the school in which the 
student is enrolled. 

If a student does not have an Associate degree, transfer credit is given 
for grades of "C" or higher. The Dean of the School or the Chairman of 
a Department makes the final decision concerning the total number of 
acceptable transfer credits, in accordance with the requirements of a 
particular department, a student may be required to take an English or 
Mathematics examination. 

The maximum number of equivalent semester hours of transfer credit 
from any four-year source is 90 hours, except by written authorization 
of the Dean of the School in which the student is enrolled. 

Transfer students who wish to fulfill the requirements for the Bachelor 
degree or the Associate degree at the University of New Haven must 
complete the last 30 semester hours of their program at the University 
of New Haven. Also, for the Associate degree 12 semester hours must 
be in the field of specialization, and for the Bachelor degree 18 se- 
mester hours must be in the field of specialization. 



TRANSFER OF 
CREDIT 



17 



Transferring of Credits Credits may be transferred from the Univer- 
sity of New Haven, a fully accredited university, to any other college 
or university, merely by obtaining a letter of authorization from the 
school regularly attended. 



GENERAU INFORMATION 



COURSES 

AVAILABLE 

AT OTHER 

COLLEGES 



The University of New Haven lias established policies to allow its 
students to take courses at Southern Connecticut State College, Alber- 
tus Magnus College, and Quinnipiac College. University of New Haven 
students interested in taking courses at other colleges and universities 
in the New Haven area should discuss this matter directly with the 
Deans of their Schools and consult the statement of policy established 
by the Schools of Arts and Sciences, Business Administration, and 
Engineering. These statements of policy are described in the sections 
of the catalog related to the Schools of Arts and Sciences, Business 
Administration, and Engineering. 



INTERDISCIPLINARY 
PROGRAMS 



18 



For students with particular needs and interests, certain departments 
at the University offer the opportunity for an interdisciplinary major. 
The student may plan a program in two or more major de- 
partments. In such cases, the Dean will appoint a faculty member 
from each department to plan with the student a sequence of courses 
which most nearly satisfies his or her interests. The program will 
generally consist of existing courses and independent study. A mini- 
mum of 51 credits in the area of interest must be completed to satisfy 
the requirements for graduation. The program must be approved by 
the Department Chairman and forwarded to the Registrar to be filed 
in the student's folder. 



DOUBLE MAJOR 



INTERSESSION 




A Minor or an Associate degree may be taken in a department other 
than that of the student's major concurrent with the pursual of the 
major program. A full double-major may be taken by fulfilling all the 
core requirements for each major. This includes the core requirements 
of each division and each department involved. The total number of 
credit hours varies from 150 to more than 160. 

During the Intersession, the University offers a number of courses 
for credit. The Intersession comes between the fall and spring semes- 
ters. The program offered during the Intersession includes both regular 
and special courses. The Intersession program seeks to utilize the 
special expertise of the faculty and to blend innovative and traditional 
methods of teaching such as team-teaching, field trips, laboratory 
work, lecturing and research projects. 



The University offers summer sessions witii these primary functions: 

1. To offer opportunity for summer study to those residents of the 
New Haven area who attend other schools during the regular school 
year. For financial reasons, most of these students find it desirable 
to live at home and work during the summer. The summer program 
of the University is offered in both the Day and Evening divisions. 
Reasons for summer study vary, but are generally confined to the 
following: 

a. To make up deficiencies. 

b. To satisfy prerequisites for courses in the present institution. 

c. To acquire advanced standing in the parent school. 

In general, credits earned at the University of New Haven are 
acceptable to parent institutions. For assurance of the acceptance 
of credit by the parent school, written approval of that school is 
required. The University of New Haven is a member of the New 
England Association of Schools and Colleges and the National As- 
sociation of Summer Schools. 

2. To provide opportunity for summer study to the students of the 
University. Reasons for summer study for this group of students 
may be described as follows: 

a. To lighten the study load during the regular school year, but 
still meet the yearly requirements of the program. 

b. To shorten the normal time required for a degree. 

c. To take preparatory work. 

d. To make up deficiencies caused by failure in certain courses. 

e. To take additional work beyond the degree and yet complete 
a program within the normal time. 

The accomplishment of any one of the five objectives listed above will 
depend on the specific subjects offered during any summer session. 



SUMMER 
SESSIONS 



19 



Registration For all new students a personal interview with a staff 
member of the University is necessary. Registration procedures will 
be explained at this time. A student taking courses for transfer of credit 
to another institution must submit a letter of authorization from that 
institution with the registration material. This procedure should be fol- 
lowed each semester regardless of previous attendance. 



REGISTRATION 



TUITION, FEES 
& EXPENSES 



Day Division, regular academic year 1974-1975 

Application Fee $ 15.00 

Payable only once, at time of initial application. 
Not refundable. 

Acceptance Fee 35.00 

Payable by all new students (incoming freshmen, transfer, 
and former students) upon notification of acceptance. 
Not refundable. 



20 



Summer Terms and Evening Division 

Information regarding both summer sessions and the Evening Divi- 
sion may be obtained from the respective schools. 



TUITION 

(Fall 1974, Spring 1975 Rates) 

Per semester Per year 

1. Full time students (12-18 hours or equivalent) in 

day or evenmg sections $ 975.00 $1,950.00 

2. Less than 12 credit hours in day division per 
credit hour $81.25 

3. Less than 12 credit hours in evening division per 
credit hour $45.00 

4. More than 18 credit hours or equivalent per credit 
hour — taken in day or evening division $45.00 

Student activity fee 

Total standard tuition and fees for regular full time 
students for academic year 1974-1975 

Note: The Student activity fee is distributed by the student government and 
covers the cost of student supported services such as the newspaper and 
the radio station, and helps defray the expenses of clubs, organizations, so- 
cial activities, and the football and lacrosse teams. 

Important: Tuition rates listed are for 1974-75. Because of current economic con- 
ditions, it was not possible to set tuition for 1975-76 at the time this 
catalog was printed. 



30.00 



60.00 



$1,005.00 $2,010.00 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Registration late fees — Assessed for failure to complete reg- 
istration at the designated time $15.00 

Tuition late fee — All students who have not completed tuition 
payment by the start of the semester will be assessed a 
late fee of $5.00 plus $1.00 for each additional day there- 
after up to a maximum of $30. 

Laboratory fees — payable each semester by students regis- 
tering for courses requiring the laboratory fee. See 
Course Descriptions for specific amounts. Not refundable. 

Make-up examination — Assessed when a student is permit- 
ted to take an end-of-semester examination at a time other 
than the scheduled time, except for conflicts caused by 
the examination schedule 

Make-up test — Assessed when a student is permitted to 
make up an announced test during the semester 

Auditors — The fee for a student auditor in any course or 
courses is the same as if the courses were taken for credit. 

Graduation fee — Assessed regardless of participation in ex- 
ercises; no reduction will be made for non-attendance. For 
graduation in June, fee is due no later than March 1 of 
year of graduation; for January commencement, fee is due 
before October 15 of prior calendar year 



OTHER CHARGES 



Transcript of academic work- 
thereafter, per copy 



-no charge for the first one; 



5.00 



3.00 



35,00 



21 



1.00 



Dormitory rooms are contracted for the entire academic year ex- 
cluding intersession courses. The dormitory will officially be closed 
during Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Spring vacation periods when 
classes are not in session. 

A dormitory deposit is required of all students to be placed in the 
dormitory, and this deposit will be deducted from the spring semes- 
ter room charge. The room deposit is not refundable after July 31st 
of the year to which it pertains. 



RESIDENCE 
CHARGES 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



LIVING EXPENSES 



22 



WITHDRAWAL 

& REFUND 

OF TUITION 



The University assumes no responsibility for loss or destruction of 
any clothing or personal belongings of the student. 

An optional linen plan is available for those students who desire it. 

Room Deposit $100.00 

Room Charge Per Year 750.00* 

Damage Deposit (Refundable) 50.00 

20 Meal Plan (Mon.-Sat. 3 meals per day, 

Sunday Brunch and Dinner) per semester 



295.00* 
270.00* 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



15 Meal Plan (Mon.-Fri.) per semester 

* Residence and board charges are for the academic year September 
1974 - June 1975. Because of current economic conditions, it was 
not possible to set rates for 1975-76 at the time this catalog was 
printed. 

Tuition, fees, and other charges are payable when due. Checks or 
money orders should be made payable to University of New Haven. 

As a convenience to those who desire to spread their payments out 
over a period of time, a deferred education payment plan is available 
to full-time students and to part-time students carrying six or more 
credits or the equivalent. Details of this plan are available at the 
Business Office. 

The University withholds the giving of grades, the issuance of tran- 
scripts, and the granting of honorable dismissal to any student whose 
account is in arrears. 

From University — Students are required to discuss their intentions 
with a member of the Counseling Center before officially withdrawing 
from the University. Forms for withdrawal are available at the Counsel- 
ing Center. 

From a Program — Students considering a change in program should 
first discuss the matter with the department chairman of the proposed 
new program. If it is agreed that the change is advisable, written per- 
mission will be granted. Forms for making a change are provided by the 
Reception Office. 

Course changes — Forms are available at the Student Records Office. 

Registration does not carry with it the right of an automatic refund 
of tuition in cases of withdrawal. No deduction is made for temporary 
absence from classes, nor is any refund made if a student is suspended 
or dismissed. 



Any student under the age of 18 must have the written consent 
of a parent or guardian with an indication to whom any refund, 
if applicable, is to be paid. 

Tuition is refunded or canceled according to the scale below 
upon receipt of formal withdrawal request before the end of the 
fourth week of a semester. 



WITHDRAWAL 



1st Week — 


80% 


2nd Week — 


60% 


3rd Week — 


40% 


4th Week — 


20% 


After 4th Week — 


0% 



A prorated credit toward the following semester or refund may be 
awarded, subject to the decision of the Committee on Withdrawals, in 
situations involving: 

(a) death or protracted illness of a student 

(b) involuntary induction into military service 

(c) other clearly extenuating circumstances 

(d) in the case of part-time students, transfer or change of 
work initiated by employer that precludes meeting class 
schedules 

All requests for refund must be made in writing and include necessary 
documentation. The University assumes no responsibility beyond the 
foregoing for withdrawal occasioned by the pressures of family life or 
occupation. 

Summer session students — In cases of withdrawal from a course 
or courses within the first week of each term, a refund of 50% of 
tuition is made. There is no refund of summer tuition after the first 
week. 

The foregoing policy is intended to protect the University, since the 
University plans its expenses and bases its budget upon full collection 
of tuition and fees from all registered students, and assumes the 
obligation of supplying instruction and other services throughout the 
year. 



23 



Changes in Arrangements The Board of Governors of the Univer- 
sity of New Haven reserves the right to make those changes in tui- 
tion, fees, and other costs which, in its judgment, are considered 
necessary and just. No changes in charges will be made retro- 
active. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND FACILITIES 



JOHN W. GHOREYEB 
Dean of Students 

CAROLE AIKEN 

Director of Women's Affairs 

DIRECTOR OF BLACK STUDENT AFFAIRS 

DAVID DuBUISSON 

Director of Financial Aid 
Foreign Students Advisor 

CHRISTIAN F. POULSON 

Director of Career Development 

PHILIP S. ROBERTSON 

Director of Housing and Health 

GEORGE A, SCHAEFER 

Coordinator of Veterans Affairs 

MICHAEL W, YORK 

Director of Counseling 



SAMUEL M. BAKER, JR. 
University Librarian 

JOSEPH A. MACHNIK 

Acting Director of Athletics 

LAWRENCE C. PARKER 

Director of Development 
and Alumni Relations 



ALUMNI 
ASSOCIATION 



26 



Membership in the Alumni Association is acquired immediately upon 
graduation. All degree graduates of the University as well as diploma 
graduates of the School of Executive Development and the Management 
Center become members automatically. Including the class of 1974, 
there are nearly 7,000 members of the Alumni Association. A member 
of the administrative staff of the University serves as Director of Alum- 
ni Relations. An Executive Committee conducts the affairs of the As- 
sociation during the period between meetings and also serves as a 
planning group. There is an alumni fund chairman for annual giving. 

In addition to the bi-annual meeting, other meetings of social and 
educational interest occur during the year, and a quarterly publication, 
the Alumni News, is mailed without charge to each alumnus. Alumni 
Homecoming is an annual event occurring in October of each year. 

The Alumni Association is represented on the Board of Governors by 
a member who is elected to the Board for a term of two years. The 
president of the Association serves on the Board of Governors as an 
ex-officio member. 

Membership on the Alumni Advisory Council is by invitation. Twenty 
or more outstanding graduates of the University constitute the group. 
The Council is an advisory board to the University in the conduct of 
alumni affairs. Its primary objectives are to strengthen alumni relations, 
advise on matters of top-level policy involving the alumni, improve 
alumni communications, and assist in planning and conducting alumni 
events. The Council meets quarterly at the University with the President 
of the University and the Director of Alumni Relations. 



ATHLETICS 




The University offers a wide range of opportunities to its students as 
participants or spectators in a comprehensive athletic program. 

The Athletic Department has received national recognition as its teams 
participate in many regional and national tournaments. The University 
is a member of the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC), the 
National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), the New England Col- 
lege Athletic Conference (NECAC) and the New England Football Con- 
ference (NEFC). 

The University competes in varsity athletics in baseball, basketball, 
hockey, soccer, cross country, golf, tennis, lacrosse and football. In 
addition to the intercollegiate athletic program, a year-round schedule 
of intramural athletics is open to all students and includes special pro- 
grams for women. A limited, but growing, varsity schedule for women is 
also offered. Currently women's varsity teams are supported in basket- 
ball and tennis. 



The University's athletic Physical Education Auditorium building is the 
center of all indoor athletic activity. The building has three basketball 
courts, a steam room, a handball court, a multi-purpose room, a weight 
lifting room, men's and w/omen's locker rooms, storage areas and gen- 
eral office space. Outdoor facilities include six tennis courts, a baseball 
diamond and space for football, soccer and lacrosse fields. 

The new Marvin K. Peterson Library, named for President Emeritus 
Peterson, was dedicated Oct. 20, 1974. Built at a cost of $1,664,280, 
the new library has a capacity of 300,000 bound volumes. It adjoins the 
main administration building and includes a rare book room, a special 
collection room, a music room, archives and spacious reading and 
reference areas. Study is made convenient by modern research facili- 
ties and equipment, including eight microreading stations and three 
microform reader-printers. 



LIBRARY 



The Library contains more than 85,000 volumes, 35,000 U.S. docu- 
ments, over 2500 LP's, extensive corporation annual reports, pam- 
phlet files, and microfilm. The Library subscribes to 975 periodicals 
and extensive back-issue files are maintained. 

The resources of the New Haven and West Haven Public Libraries are 
available to students (non-residents must pay a fee). Under a reciprocal 
policy, students may charge material from Albertus Magnus and Quinni- 
piac libraries by presenting their validated ID's. 



27 



Recognizing the importance of non-academic activities to the devel- ^TIIDFNT 

opment of the student, the University offers a well-rounded program of *^ ' UULIi I 

services and activities designed to make assistance available when SERVICES 
needed and to provide outlets for maturing student interests. 



Black Student Affairs The Director of Black Student Affairs is avail- 
able to aid Black students in making this University relevant to their 
needs, and to assist the Dean of Students and the President in making 
decisions concerning Black students. 

The Director of Black Student Affairs also serves as the Coordinator of 
Black Studies. In this capacity, he assists instructors and students in 
the implementation of Black courses. 



BLACK STUDENT 
AFFAIRS 



Foreign Students The University is fortunate in having a number of 
countries represented on the campus. The Foreign Student Adviser 
provides special guidance when needed. An International Students Club 
at the University sponsors activities and trips, and the International 
Student Center of New Haven welcomes all foreign students to use their 
facilities and programs throughout the year. 



FOREIGN 
STUDENTS 



STUDENT SERVICES 



VETERANS 
AFFAIRS 



Veterans Affairs Since the University has one of the largest veteran 
enrollments in Connecticut, an Office of Veterans Affairs, with a full- 
time Coordinator and secretary, is maintained. The Veterans Adminis- 
tration has assigned to the University a full-time V'.A. representative 
who maintains liaison directly with state and national V.A. offices. In 
addition to processing applications for vat-ious V.A. benefits, the camp- 
us Veterans office provides a wide range of supportive services for veter- 
ans attending the University. Assistance is available in academic areas 
and special help such as tutorial assistance is available. 



WOMEN'S AFFAIRS 



28 



CAREER 
DEVELOPMENT 



Women's Affairs The Office of the Director of Women's Affairs is lo- 
cated in the Student Center. Activities of special interest to women are 
coordinated through the Director, who meets regularly with women 
students. Personal counseling is available at any time. 

The coordination of Women's Studies is planned in conjunction with 
the Community Committee of Women's Affairs, a group of faculty, staff 
and students dedicated to the promotion of women's issues at the Uni- 
versity. 

Career Development Office This office has two primary functions with- 
in the University: career counseling and placement. The staff works 
closely with the Counseling Center to help determine an appropriate 
career path for individual students. To assist students in a career 
choice, individual counseling, a career library and career seminars are 
available. In addition, a program of oncampus recruiting visits by em- 
ployers is arranged each year for the benefit of University of New 
Haven students, both undergraduate and graduate. 

While the Career Development Office is not an employment service, 
listings of full-time and part-time openings are maintained to provide a 
common meeting ground for employers and prospective employees. 

Students seeking employment should visit the office personally as early 
as possible to discuss their plans. Alumni seeking positions are invited 
to use the services of the office. 

Employers wishing to list positions with the Career Development Office 
need only call the office or write, giving a description of the position 
available and other details. There is never any fee charged for listing 
a position. 



COUNSELING & 
TESTING 



Counseling Individual counseling is offered students for personal 
problems, for marital and domestic problems, and for study and 
career choice problems. Students can obtain assistance for education, 
vocational and general life problems. 

A student who does not know where to go for help should contact the 
Counseling Center for information and direction. 



Testing The Counseling Center of the University of New Haven offers 
psychological testing including vocational interest, personality assess- 
ment and academic placement. Students who are unsure of their aca- 
demic skills, eventual career choices or life goals may request help in 
these areas. 

As a service to first semester seniors and members of the community 
who are planning to apply to graduate schools, a Controlled Testing 
Center is maintained on campus. Arrangements may be made with the 
Center for administration of the Miller Analogies Test and the forward- 
ing of the score to the graduate school of the applicant's choice. 



More than one-half of the students at the University receive financial 
assistance annually in the form of scholarships, grants, loans, bur- 
sary work, and the College Work-Study Program. Applications should 
be made by returning students no later than April 1 for the following 
year and by new students before June 1. 

Usually financial aid is not available for the summer term or at mid- 
year. Ordinarily students needing assistance will seek employment 
during the summer to help defray their expenses for the following year. 

Full information and applications for financial aid may be obtained 
from the Director of Financial Aid. 



FINANCIAL AID 



29 



Academic Scholarships A number of scholarships are awarded each 
year on the basis of academic achievement, financial need, evidence 
of self-help, and overall contribution to the University. To be eligible 
a student must have a cumulative Quality Point Ratio of 3.0 or better 
and must show evidence of financial need. 

Donor Scholarships Many scholarship awards are available each year 
through the generosity of business firms, organizations, and friends 
of the University. 

Amity Charitable Trust Fund — An annual award is made from the in- 
come of this fund to worthy students, based on ability, promise, and 
financial need without regard to sex, race, country of national origin, or 
religion. Preference is given to students whose homes are in the Greater 
New Haven area. 

Asarco-Enthone Scholarship — An award of $1,000 is given annually to 
a student in the field of Chemistry. The recipient must be a citizen of 
the United States or Canada and be in'good health. Selection is based 
on activities as well as scholarship. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 
& AWARDS 




1 



30 




Clarence W. Dunham Scholarship — An annual award of $500 is made 
to a Civil Engineering student after completion of his freshman year. 
Applicants must be recommended by the Dean of Engineering and the 
Chairman of Civil Engineering. 

Chesebrough-Ponds Engineering Scholarship — This scholarship is des- 
ignated for a minority student in the field of engineering. Preference is 
given to U. S. citizens. High academic ability and promise are prime 
considerations. 

Connecticut Hotel-Motel Association — The Association offers scholar- 
ship aid to Connecticut students majormg in the Department of Hotel, 
Restaurant, Institutional Management, Tourism and Travel. 

Faculty Wives Club Scholarship — This award is given to a student 
demonstrating outstanding academic achievement as well as need for 
assistance. 

Food Service Executives Association — The Connecticut Branch of 
F.S.E.A. provides scholarship aid for needy students in the Department 
of Hotel, Restaurant, Institutional Management, Tourism and Travel. 

H. B. Ives Company Scholarship Foundation — An annual award of $500 
is made to a male undergraduate seeking a degree in engineering, 
business administration, or management. The recipient must be a 
resident of New Haven County, 

National Institute for the Food Service Industry — The Golden Plate 
Scholarship Award is available to an outstanding student in the De- 
partment of Hotel, Restaurant, Institutional Management, Tourism and 
Travel based on need and ability. 

New England Hotel-Motel and Restaurant Educational Foundation — 

The Foundations presents annual scholarships to deserving students in 
this field. 

Southern Connecticut Gas Company Scholarship — A scholarship of 
one-half year's tuition is sponsored by the Southern Connecticut Gas 
Company. This award is made annually to an inner-city resident of New 
Haven meeting need and academic qualifications. 

Statler Foundation — The Foundation makes annual awards to deserv- 
ing students of the Department of Hotel, Restaurant, Institutional Man- 
agement, Tourism and Travel. 

The Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Scholarship Fund — Annual 
awards are available to students entering the University of New Haven 
who exemplify the ideals of the late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. A gen- 
erous gift from the Guilford Human Relations Council provides addi- 
tional awards to New Haven area Black students. 



The New Haven Chapter of the American Society of Tool Engineers — 

Annual scholarships to students in mechanical engineering are pro- 
vided. 

The Olin Employees Fund — Full tuition scholarships are offered to sons 
and daughters of Olin employees meeting the standards of selection. 

Virginia M. Parker Scholarship — Established by Chi Kappa Rho soror- 
ity, it is awarded annually to a freshman woman selected on the basis 
of scholarship, potential, and financial need. 

Sales and Marketing Executives Club of New Haven — An annual award 
is open to a superior student in the field of sales and marketing. 

Woman's Seamen's Friend Society of Connecticut — Assistance is 

offered to sons and daughters of merchant seamen of Connecticut and 3j_ 

to students preparing for careers in the maritime industry. 

Yale University — The scholarship plan for sons and daughters of facul- 
ty and staff members of Yale University provides scholarship grants to 
qualified students. 

Other scholarships of a restricted nature are available. 

Annual prizes include the Freshman English Prize and the Nordlund 
Cup, which is awarded to an outstanding Business major. 



Grants The University awards a limited number of grants to students GRANTS 

who have demonstrated academic promise and financial need, while 
at the same time contributing substantially to some area of University 
activity. 

The Basic Educational Opportunity Grant Program is designed to assist 
needy students entering post-secondary education. Applications and 
information usually are available through high school guidance offices 
and the student makes direct application to the Program offices. 

Students with extreme needs may qualify for grants of from $200 to 
$1,000 annually under the Supplemental Educational Opportunity 
Grants Program of the Federal government. These grants, matched by 
other University assistance, are designed to make possible higher edu- 
cation for capable applicants who would otherwise be unable to attend. student services 



LOANS 



32 



LAW ENFORCEMENT 

ASSISTANCE 

PROGRAMS 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Many states and organizations offer scholarships and grants for 
which UNH students may be eligible. It is suggested that entering 
students, especially, become aware of any such opportunities for assist- 
ance. 

Special aid consideration is given to Connecticut residents with fi- 
nancial need through funds made available to the University by the 
State of Connecticut. 

National Direct Student Loans This program was established by the 
Higher Education Amendments of 1972 replacing the former National 
Defense Student Loan Program. Funds are available for loans of up 
to $1,000 annually to needy students with satisfactory academic 
records. Loans are repayable starting nine months after graduation 
at three percent simple interest. 

United Student Aid Fund This private, non-profit service corporation 
provides long term, low interest loans to upperclassmen in good stand- 
ing. Guaranty funds were provided by a donation of the Day Student 
Council so that the University could participate. 

Guaranteed Loan Programs The State of Connecticut and many other 
states have established Higher Education Loan Programs offering long 
term loans at low interest rates. In Connecticut, a student may borrow 
up to a maximum of $1,500 each school year, repayable starting one 
year after graduation. Based on a need analysis, Federal interest bene- 
fits may cover full interest while in attendance. 

Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers The Connecticut Sec- 
tion of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers Student Loan 
Fund offers non-interest-bearing loans to senior students in Electrical 
Engineering. 

Additional Loans Loan assistance to students in temporary financial 
difficulty is available through the Roy M. Jenkins, Jr., Memorial Fund 
and The C. L. Robertson Emergency Loan Fund. Both of these are 
administered by the Financial Aid Office. 

Loans The Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 
established the Law Enforcement Student Loan Program which makes 
available ten-year, interest-bearing (7%) notes of up to $2,200 per 
academic year to full-time students enrolled in undergraduate and 
graduate programs leading to degrees in areas directly related to law 
enforcement. These loans can be canceled at the rate of 25% for each 
year of employment in a public State, Local, or Federal law enforcement 
agency. Awards of these loans are subject to current restrictions of De- 
partment of Justice (LEAA) priority guidelines. 



Grants Grants are available to full-time employees of a publicly 
funded law enforcement agency under the Law Enforcement Student 
Grant Program. Payments up to $400 per semester are provided to 
full-time and part-time students workmg toward a degree in this field. 
A recipient must agree to remain with a law enforcement agency for 
two years after completion of studies funded by this grant. 
Financial need and academic qualifications will be considered in 
selection of candidates. 



College Work-Study Program This federal assistance program is 
designed to enable students having financial need to work both during 
the summer and through the school year, thus earning a substantial 
portion of their college expenses. Work assignments are made on 
campus and also with public and private non-profit agencies such as 
the YMCA, YWCA, Benhaven, New Haven Boys' Club, Urban League of 
Greater New Haven, and the Veterans Administration Hospital in West 
Haven. 

Bursary Work The University provides many jobs on campus for 
deserving students who may benefit from this type of employment. 
Awards are made each semester of approximately $400 for working 
an average of 12 hours a week. 



STUDENT 
EMPLOYMENT 



33 



On-Campus Housing The Residence is of modern design, containing 
16 separate suites. Each suite consists of six double bedrooms opening 
out to a large living room. Each bedroom contains individual beds, 
desks, chests, and closets. Laundry facilities, snack bar, and common 
lounge are also available in the dormitory. The Residence is coeduca- 
tional; men are assigned to nine suites and women are assigned to 
seven suites. 

Applications will be filled in the order received. To be considered, 
each application for residence must be accompanied by a $100.00 
room reservation deposit. The total deposit is refundable if there is no 
available space. The dormitory contract is for the complete undergradu- 
ate school year (Fall and Spring semesters). The $100.00 reservation 
deposit will then become a security deposit and will be deducted from 
the second semester's room charge. 

The University Residence is closed during the Thanksgiving, Christ- 
mas, and Spring recesses. 

Meal Plans Two meal plans are available to all students of the Univer- 
sity. The 15-meal plan gives the student three meals per day from 
Monday through Friday. The 20-meal plan offers the student three 
meals per day Monday through Saturday and two meals on Sunday. 
The meal plans offer complete, well-balanced meals for a sizeable 
saving as compared to buying meals for cash. 



HOUSING & 
MEAL PLANS 




All dormitory students are required to have a meal plan and it is 
suggested that all off-campus residents within walking distance of the 
University participate in one of the two meal plans. 

Off-Campus Housing Because there is a limited number of off-campus 
apartments and rooms \n the immediate area, the University is unable 
to guarantee off-campus accommodations of your choice. 

The University Housing Office will have listings of all University 
approved housing in the general area. These listings will be available 
in the Housing Office during the latter half of July. 

In entering into an arrangement for private housing, the financial 
terms should be discussed and implemented by the student himself. 
The University is of course not responsible for these arrangements, but 
will make every effort to see that the student is treated fairly. 

34 HEALTH Physical Examination Students are requested to provide a report of 

orpwiprc a recent physical examination to the Health Service upon acceptance 

otRVIUto so that the Health Service will have available past medical history, in 

& INSURANCE case of emergency. Appropriate forms for this purpose are provided. 

Infirmary The Infirmary, located in the Residence, is available for 
emergency first aid treatment and examination for all students, with- 
out charge. Day beds are provided for rest and care of mild illnesses 
for students living in University approved housing. The University 
Health Staff, under the direction of the Director of Housing and 
Student Center, includes the University internist, nurses and psy- 
chologist. 

Accident and Health Insurance The University of New Haven Student 
Insurance Plan is another important service to full-time students and 
their families. It was conceived and planned by the Student Government 
and is designed to help full-time students of the University meet un- 
expected and, very often, costly medical bills arising from an accident, 
and hospital and medical expenses required by sickness. 

The Plan provides protection while the student is at home, at school, 
or on vacation, 24 hours a day for a full twelve months. Benefits are 
payable in addition to those the student may receive from any other 
policy. Details of the Plan are available in a folder sent to all full-time 
students and from the University nurse. 



STUDENT student Councils Separate Day and Evening student councils have 

the responsibility for initiating 
curricular activities and for p 
dents and the University staff. 



APTiVITIF^ ^^^ responsibility for initiating, organizing, and carrying through extra 

MUllVlllto curricular activities and for performing liaison functions between stu 



Clubs and Organizations There are almost 40 University student 
clubs and societies open to interested students. Included are student 
chapters of professional societies, religious organizations, social 
groups, and special interest clubs. 

Cultural Activities There are student organizations formed around in- 
terests in literature, art, films, and drama. These groups sponsor visit- 
ing artists and lecturers, publish materials, and generally provide a 
well-rounded cultural program for University of New/ Haven students. 

Fraternities and Sororities Many national and local service, social, and 
honorary fraternities and sororities are active on campus. They spon- 
sor programs such as the semi-annual Bloodmobile and other services, 
as well as social functions. 



Publications Student publications include The News, the University 
student newspaper; The Chariot, the annual yearbook; the Noiseless 
Spider, a literary publication; and the Student Handbook. Any student 
may volunteer his services on any of the student publications. 



35 



Radio Station WNHU, 88.7 MHZ, is the University's student-operated 
FM radio station. Located in the Student Center, the 1,700 watt station 
serves the Student Body and the greater New Haven community. All 
work and management is done by students and any student may volun- 
teer his help. 

In its first year of operation, WNHU gained national attention when disc 
jockey Tony Saizo set a 270-hour world's record for continuous broad- 
casting. 



Social Activities The social calendar is filled with varied events to ap- 
peal to all students: mixers, concerts with large and small name attrac- 
tions, films, free parties to climax each semester, cabarets, and Home- 
coming. 

The Student Center The Student Center provides a focal point for all 
student activities. Offering lounges, student offices, a game room, a 
large cafeteria and a snack bar, the facility has been designed to serve 
as a center for the student's non-academic college interests. 

The Rathskellar, also located in the Student Center, opens daily, serv- 
ing draft beer and snacks. 

Bookstore The University bookstore offers new and used text mater- 
ials, art and engineering supplies, and a large variety of University-em- 
blemed gift items. 




SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

DOUGLAS ROBILLARD, DEAN 



Bachelor of Arts Degree 



MAJORS IN: 



AMERICAN STUDIES 

ART 

BIOLOGY 

CHEMISTRY 

ECONOMICS 

ENGLISH 

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 

HISTORY 

MATHEMATICS 

PHILOSOPHY 

PHYSICS 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

PSYCHOLOGY 

SOCIAL WELFARE 

SOCIOLOGY 

WORLD MUSIC 



Associate in Science Degree 



MAJORS IN: 



BIOLOGY 
CHEMISTRY 
COMMERCIAL AND 

ADVERTISING ART 
GENERAL STUDIES 
JOURNALISM 
OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY 

AND HEALTH 



Bachelor of Science Degree 



MAJORS IN: 



BIOLOGY 
CHEMISTRY 
FIRE SCIENCE 
OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY 

AND HEALTH 
PHYSICS 



ADTC With varied programs of studies and an exciting cultural location, the 

MIX lO Ol University offers unique advantages to the student, for there are nu- 

SCIENCES merous opportunities for educational experiences outside the class- 

room. 



38 



Several libraries in the vicinity offer specialized collections; a natural 
history museum, art exhibitions, creative arts and dance workshops, 
historical societies, and women's groups play a role. Speakers and per- 
formers are brought to the campus by the Arts and Sciences Forum, 
and a constant procession of important speakers and performing artists 
come to the New Haven area. The Schubert Theater presents pre- 
Broadway showings of new plays and road-company performances of 
hit shows; The Long Wharf is an excellent regional group and the Yale 
Repertory Theater is innovative and exciting. The opportunity to see 
films is as good here as it would be in many larger cities. 

There are opportunities to supplement classroom and book studies with 
work experiences at mental health clinics, hospitals, social welfare 
agencies, courts and corrections institutions. The area presents nu- 
merous ethnic enclaves and neighborhoods. Long Island Sound and 
nearby ski areas offer recreation. New York, with its wealth of concerts, 
art galleries, lectures, plays, films, sports events, is less than two 
hours away. 



MINORS 



APPLICATION 

TO THE 

PROGRAM 



Minors are offered in the following subjects: 



Art 

Biology 

Chemistry 

English 

Fire Science 

History 

Journalism 

Mathematics 



Occupational Safety 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Social Welfare 

Sociology 

World Music 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



An applicant for admission to the Arts & Sciences Program must be a 
graduate of an approved secondary school or the equivalent. While 
no set program of high school subjects is prescribed, an applicant must 
meet the standard of the University in respect to the high school 
average and present 15 acceptable units of satisfactory work, includ- 
ing 9 or more units of college preparatory subjects. Satisfactory scores 
on College Entrance Examination Board (S.A.T.) or American College 
Testing Program tests (A.C.T.) are required. 



Matriculation for Bachelor Degree Students who have completed at 
least two semesters or equivalent (30 academic credit hours) with a 
minimum quality point ratio of 2.00 may apply for matriculation for 
the Bachelor degree. 

Admission will be limited to applicants who have given evidence of 
capacity and motivation adequate for upper division work as determined 
by the department chairman. 

A cumulative quality point ratio of at least 2.00 is required in a 
Bachelor of Arts student's major field. 



MATRICULATION 



American Studies A Bachelor of Arts major in American Studies is ARFA9 

offered jointly by departments in Humanities and Social Sciences. fAlAuAAO 

This program consists of a series of interdepartmental seminars em- QC 

phasizing various aspects of contemporary American civilization and oTiirkv/ 

culture and stresses independent reading and research by the student. STUDY 
For further information contact the chairman of the appropriate de- 
partment. 



39 



Anthropology The student who wishes a broad background in the 
Study of Man may select the anthropology concentration. It is inter- 
disciplinary in scope with overlapping interest in the humanities, social 
sciences, and natural sciences. The student together with his advisor 
works out a program tailored to his particular needs. 

Students in anthropology may anticipate going on to graduate school: 
working in museums; or working for philanthropic, governmental or 
social service organizations. A broad base such as anthropology further 
provides one with a sound liberal arts background for more specialized 
backgrounds in the professions: medicine, law, dentistry, veterinary 
sciences, journalism. For further information contact the chairman of 
sociology. 

Art Study of the visual arts provides opportunity for self-realization and 
gives the individual a perception of his relationship to society. The 
program is designed to develop sensitivity to visual materials and 
experiences and the psychic response to them by which the student 
will be led to make his own expressive statement in a variety of media. 
Many career opportunities exist for those who are competent in the 
visual arts. Among these are openings for art directors in various fields 
of business and industry. The program also provides excellent prepara- 
tion for further study in art education, graphic art, industrial design, 
architecture, city planning, cinema, television, and art history. 




AREAS 
OF 

STUDY 



A minimum of 42 semester hours in art is required for the major. 
Flexibility of planning is provided but the students must adhere to the 
following basic outline of courses: AT 101-102 (Introduction to Studio 
Art), AT 105 (Basic Drawing), AT 201 (Painting I), History of Art (six 
semester hours), AT 201-202 (Design), AT 302 (Figure Drawing) and 
AT 401 (Studio Seminar I). Art majors are encouraged to elect courses 
in art beyond the minimum requirements. 



40 



Biology The program prepares the student for medical, dental, veter- 
inary, or other professional training, as well as for a graduate program 
in biology and in allied health fields. Students in other disciplines, 
allied or not related, frequently choose biology as a minor area of con- 
centration. This is particularly true for those majoring in the social and 
behavioral sciences. 



For those not seeking specific professional specialization, employment 
opportunities for biologists are found in industry, federal, state, and 
municipal organizations, hospitals, research and technical laboratories, 
as well as in teaching. New employment areas are appearing where a 
knowledge of biology and a second discipline are required. Examples 
of these are Bioengineering, Psychobiology, Environmental Science, 
Pharmaceutical and Biological Sales, Management in Biological Busi- 
ness, Oceanography, Forensic Science, and many more related to 
biology, such as Pharmacology and Toxicology. 



Prospective biology majors, and those wishing to follow a Pre-Medical, 
Pre-Dental, Pre-Veterinary, or Allied Health Program, should consult 
with a member of the Biology Department before registration or during 
the first week of their first term. 




Biology majors are required to take SC 251-252, CH 105-106, M 115- 
116 or M 117-118 or M 127-128, SC 201, SC 301, PH 103-104, PH 
105-106, SC 222, SC 308, SC 307 or SC 309, SC 361-362, SC 591- 
592, SC 595, and four elective courses. One year of an elementary 
language is required, plus one semester at the intermediate level 
which should be a course in scientific literature. 



Chemistry This major is offered for those students who wish to avail 
themselves of the many career opportunities in the general field of 
chemistry and also for those who wish to go on to graduate work with 
a broad liberal education and a thorough grounding in a scientific 
discipline. 



Career opportunities exist in the following areas: Management, tech- 
nical purchasing or sales, research, product control, production, and 
product development in the chemical, pharmaceutical, or related 
industries; analysis and research in forensic science, medicine, ocean- 
ography, and the environmental sciences; sales and product develop- 
ment in the laboratory equipment field; and teaching. 

In addition to the regular programs, a student may elect options in the 
following areas: Biology, Business, Engineering, Environmental Studies, 
Fire Science, Forensic Science, Pre-Dental, Pre-Medical, or Pre-Veter- 
inary. Courses in each option are taken instead of the normal electives. 
For details of the options, the department chairman should be con- 
sulted. 



AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



A major in Chemistry must complete the following courses: Six to 
twelve semester hours of German, Russian, French, or the equivalent, 
PH 150, 205; CH 105, 106, 211, 301, 302, 341, 401, 421, 431, 
432, 451, 452 or CH 400 elective. In addition the student is required 
to take Mathematics through M 203. 



41 



Economics An economics major within a broad program of liberal 
studies provides a preparation for higher positions in business and 
industry today. It is also excellent preparation for graduate work in 
business administration or for graduate study in economics itself. 

Economics majors will be required to take, in addition to EC 133-134 
(Principles of Economics I and II), a total of 27 semester hours, includ- 
ing EC 336 (Money and Banking), EC 320 (Mathematical Methods in 
Economics), EC 340 (Microeconomic Analysis), EC 445 (Macroeco- 
nomic Analysis), and EC 450 (Thesis). Beyond these requirements, a 
flexible program may be devised for each major to fit the student's 
needs and interests. With the approval of the chairman or some other 
member of the department, a student may elect suitable courses in 
other departments to fulfill the semester hour requirement. 



Economics majors are required to take A 111 (Accounting), M 
(Finite Mathematics), and BA 216 (Statistics). 



127 



ARTS AND SCIENCES 



AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



42 



Fire Science Administration A student earning a Bachelor's degree 
in Fire Science Administration is able to apply modern management 
techniques to the development and operation of a fire department. His 
programs include courses such as accounting, cost control, industrial 
relations, contracts and specifications, techniques of management, and 
collective bargaining. 

Fire Science is a cross disciplinary field. It adapts courses from chem- 
istry, mathematics, accounting, business administration, industrial 
engineering, civil engineering, and, in its arson investigation courses, 
criminal justice, as well as courses in fire prevention and suppression. 

Fire Science Technology A program leading to a Bachelor's degree in 
Fire Science Technology is an upper-level two-year program, attracting 
students with degrees in fire science programs from the community 
colleges, continuing the educational development begun there. The 
stress is first of all on fire prevention. Many of the courses cover vari- 
ous engineering fields adapted to the problems that will confront the 
fire technologist. The essentials of fire chemistry, dynamics, statics, the 
way in which materials behave under various conditions of stress 
including heat, process and transportation hazards, the design of 
industrial structures and conveyances for the maximum protection of 
the worker and the public, are essential areas of study. Courses in fire 
suppression play a role almost equal to that of fire prevention. These 
include an investigation of fire suppression fluids and systems, hydrau- 
lics and thermodynamics. The student who completes this program is 
a planner, a designer of fire prevention systems, a judge of facilities 
and equipment. 




n 




UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Typical Fire Technology and Administration Associate Degree Program ARFA9 

to be Completed at a Technical College Students desiring admission to r\r\l_r\0 

the Fire Science Administration or Fire Science Technology programs Qp 

leading to a Bachelor of Science degree must have an associate degree __. . ^ 

in fire technology and administration as it is offered at the technical STUDY 
colleges or the equivalent. 



Professional Courses 

Intro, to Fire Technology 
Municipal Fire Administration 
Building Construction 
Industrial Processes and Hazards 
Hydraulic Technology 
Water Supply and Sprinklers 
Fire Investigation 
Fire Fighting Strategy 
Professional Electives 



Sam. 
Hrs. 

4 
2 
4 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
10-16 

30-36 



General Courses 

English I, II, & III 

Mathematics 

Science (Integrated Science or Physics 

and Chemistry) 
Social or Behavioral Sciences 
Electives 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

7 
6 

6 
8 
3-6 

30-33 



43 



Third and Fourth Year Programs at the University of New Haven 





FIRE 


SCIENCE 


ADMINISTRATION 








JUNIOR 


YEAR 






Cr 








FS301 


Essentials of Fire 
Chemistry (same as 
331) 


OH 
3 






FS303 


FS498 


Research Project 


1 






M116 


M115 


Pre-Calculus Math, or 








M128 


M127 


Finite Math. 


3 






MG125 


Alll 


Intro. Accounting 1 


3 








EC133 


Prin. of Economics 1 


3 






PH104 




Elective 


3 






PH106 



16 



IE 105 



Fire Protection 
Fluids and Systems 
(same as CH332) 

Survey of Calculus or 

Statistics 

Management & Organi- 
zation 

General Physics 

General Physics Lab 

Intro, to Computers or 
Elective 



Cr 



16 



SENIOR YEAR 



FS499 
FS402 

FI227 
IE 223 
IE 233 



Cr 

Research Project 2 

Arson Investigation v»/Lab 



(same as CH411) 
Risk and Insurance 
Personnel Administration 
Cost Control 
Elective 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

17 



FS403 
PA 408 

CE407 
MG231 



Process & Transp. 
Hazards 

Collective Bargaining i 
the Public Sector 

Contracts & Specifica- 
tions 

Industrial Relations 

Electives 



B.S. Degree = 129 Semester Hours 



Cr 



3 
3 
6 

18 



ARTS AND SCIENCES 



AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY 







JUNIOR 


YEAR 










Cr 










Cr 


FS 301 


Essentials of Fire 
Ctiemistry w/Lab 3 






FS303 


Fire Protection 
Fluids & Systems 


3 


FS302 


Principles of FST w/lab 3 






FS304 


Fire Detection 




FS498 


Research Project 1 








& Control w/Lab 


3 


MT200 


Engineering Materials 3 






CE201 


Statics 


3 


M 117 


Calculus 1 3 
Elective 3 






M 118 


Calculus II 
Elective 


4 
3 



16 



16 



44 







SENIOR YEAR 












Cr 








Cr 


FS499 


Research Project 


2 




FS403 


Process & Transp. 




FS402 


Arson Investigation 








Hazards w/Lab 


3 




w/Lab 


3 




FS404 


Special Hazards 




EE336 


Instrumentation Flee. 








Control w/Lab 


3 




w/Lab 


3 




CE306 


Hydraulics 


3 


EE223 


Principles of 






ME 301 


Thermodynamics 


3 




Electrical Engineering 3 




PH 210 


Physics III or 




ME 204 


Dynamics 


3 






Physics Elective 


3 




Elective 


3 
17 






Elective 


3 
18 




B. 


S. Degree = 


= 129 Credits 







UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



English The study of literature is at tine heart of a liberal education. 
English and American literature taken together comprise one of the 
noblest monuments to man's intellect and creativity. In addition to its 
generally broadening effect, the study of literature will help the student 
to think critically and to make his writing more effective. A major in 
English is looked upon very favorably by admissions officers of law, 
medical, and dental schools. It is also good preparation for graduate 
work in such fields as business, education, urban planning, social work, 
and public health. Employers in many areas of business, industry, and 
government look favorably upon the college graduate who has both a 
rich background in literature and training in language. 

All English majors are required to take the English Literature survey 
courses (E21 1-212), and the American Literature survey courses (213- 
214). English majors also must take these courses: History of the 
English Language (302), the two courses in Shakespeare (341-342), 
and Literature of the American Renaissance (392). In addition one 
course must be taken from each of the following three groups: 



1. The Age of Chaucer (375), The Renaissance in England (323), 
English Drama to 1642 (326), The Age of Donne and Milton (362). 

2. Literature of the Neoclassic Era (371), Literature of the Romantic 
Era (353), Later Nineteenth-Century Literature (356). 

3. English Novel I (390), English Novel II (391), Modern British Lit- 
erature (361), Modern American Literature (478), Studies in Lit- 
erature (any course numbered between 481 aind 498). 

While study of a foreign language is not required, it is strongly rec- 
ommended that the student who majors in English know at least one 
foreign language. Knowledge of a foreign language makes one more 
sensitive to the use and meaning of words in one's own language. Fur- 
thermore, knowledge of a foreign language widens one's perspective 
and deepens one's understanding through the insights gained into an- 
other culture. Students who are considering graduate study certainly 
should become competent in at least one foreign language. 

So that students will become familiar with another culture, the Depart- 
ment requires English majors to take at least one semester of Con- 
tinental Literature, a course that focuses on the literature of a different 
major European culture each semester it is offered. 



AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



45 



Environmental Studies This new Bachelor program offers the student 
four options in areas of concentration beyond the common group of 
core courses. These four specialties are: Water Quality Control, Air 
Quality Control, Community Health, and Community Ecology. The first 
three are oriented towards the biological and physical sciences, while 
the fourth is concentrated heavily in the behavioral and administrative 
sciences. Actually this latter specialty is an interdisciplinary program 
in the behavioral, biological, and physical sciences. There are increas- 
ing job opportunities for those trained in the general area of Environ- 
mental Studies as teachers, technicians, administrators, field workers, 
and as assistants to administrators in business, industry, and govern- 
ment. 

A major in one of these areas of Environmental Studies will provide the 
necessary training to enable the student to continue his education and 
training in this area by being qualified to enter a professional school 
related to a specific environmental discipline, such as a school of Public 
Health or one of Urban Ecology. 

Those students interested in one of the optional programs in Environ- 
mental Studies should consult with the chairman of the Biology Depart- 
ment before registration or during the first week of their first term. 




AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



History The study of history provides excellent preparation for those 
seeking professional careers in public service and general administra- 
tion. This major also builds a good foundation for graduate study in 
various areas, such as law/ and teaching. 

All History majors will be required to take m addition to HS 111-112 
and HS 211-212 the follow/ing courses: HS 321 (History of Ancient 
Greece and Rome) or HS 317 (Renaissance and Reformation), and a 
course in Far Eastern History (HS 231 or HS 406 or HS 409). The 
major program consists of 36 hours to be determined with the advisor. 



46 



The History Department also offers majors in specific area studies: in 
American Studies, European Studies and Economic History. A student 
who wishes to major in one of these areas should consult with the de- 
partment chairman for specific requirements. 



Mathematics The program of study in mathematics can provide a 
student with a basis for a career in industry or teaching, as well as 
for further studies in graduate school. Because mathematics is funda- 
mental to so many fields, a degree in mathematics gives one an oppor- 
tunity to diversify into areas such as engineering, physics, statistics, 
computer science, and business administration. 

A major in mathematics must complete the following courses: M 117, 
M 118, M 121, M 203, M 204, M 231, M 321, M 325. In addition 
the student must complete four 300 level or 400 level mainematics 
courses approved by the mathematics department and 12 semester 
hours of natural science or engineering selected under advisement. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Occupational Safety and Health This program is designed to meet the 
stringent demands of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 
1970, which calls for a high level of professionalism in safety. The de- 
mands placed upon the safety professional require a broad background 
in physics, chemistry, engineering, psychology, and biology, to bring to- 
gether the knowledge required by OSHA Law. 

The program includes a diversified offering of restricted electives so as 
to provide a proper balance of flexibility to meet the needs and interests 
of individual students. The program description and course listings are 
available in a separate brochure 



The OSHA law applies to every employer of more than one employee. AREAS 

Consequently, the demand for professionally competent people mcludes r\i- 

not only industry but retailing, hospitals, construction, and communi- Qp 

cations, as well as government at all levels. In addition, there is a de- OTlinx/ 

mand by labor unions and by State and Federal governments for en- 5| UDY 
dorsement administrators of this Act. 



Associate in Science 



Occupational Safety and Hygiene 
FIRST YEAR 



Fall 

E 113 English Composition 

P 111 Psychology 

M 127 Finite Mathematics 

CH 105 Gen. Chem. w/lab 

Electives 
PE 111 Physical Education I 

Total 



IE 223 Personnel Administ. 
SC 121 Gen. Biology I 
SC 131 Gen. Biology lab 
FS 301 Essen. Fire Chem. w/lab 
Electives 

Total 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 
4 
3 


16 

SECOND YEAR 



E206 
IE 106 
M 128 
CH 104 

PE 112 



3 
3 
1 
3 
6 

16 



IE 216 
SC 122 
SC 132 
FS302 
SO 113 



Sem. 

Spring Hrs. 

English Composition & lit. 3 

Safety Org, & Mgt. 3 

Elementary Statistics 3 

Organic Chem. w/lab. (108) 4 

Electives 3 

Physical Education II 

Total 16 



Elem. of Ind. Hygiene 3 

General Biology II 3 

General Biology Lab 1 
Prin. Fire Sci. Tech. w/Lab 3 

Sociology 3 

Electives 3 

Total 16 



47 



Bachelor of Science — Occupational Safety and Hygiene 

(First two years same as for Associate Degree) 







THIRD YEAR 






IE 201 
SC221 

FS 303 


Fall 

Accident Cond. /Control 
Human Ecology 
Fire Prot. Fluids 
Restricted Electives 
Electives 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


CH 110 
SC 510 
FS304 


Spring 

Environmental Chemistry 
Gen. Env. Health 
Fire Det. and Control 
Restricted Electives 
Electives 


Sem, 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 




Total 


15 




Total 


15 






FOURTH YEAR 






ME 124 
SC301 


Mechanical Processes 
Microbiology w/Lab 
Restricted Electives 
Electives 


3 
3 
6 
3 


IE 217 


Ind. Safety Aux. Fund. 
Restricted Electives 
Electives 

Total 


3 
9 

7 

19 



Total 



15 



Total — Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering: 128 Semester Hours. 




48 



ADCAQ Philosophy Courses in philosophy will assist the student m any 

ni\i- o major to understand himselt and the world around him and to see his 

Qp area of interest in broader perspective. A major in philosophy will 

OTIinV ^^^^ ^^^ student integrate a broad liberal arts education through 

O I UUY systematic study of the basic problems of knowledge and of the nature 

of reality. 

A philosophy major consists of a thirty hour individually planned pro- 
gram m which all courses need not be those offered by the Philosophy 
Department. The prospective student should consult a member of the 
Department. 

Physics A major in physics will provide students with basic scientific 
knowledge for either a technical career or graduate school in any of 
the sciences and engineering. 

A Physics major must complete the following courses: PH 150, 205, 
211, 301, 351, 373, 404, 451, one from 401, 406, 415, and 12 
semester hours of Physics electives or their equivalents. In addition he 
must complete M 117, 118, 203, 204, 6 semester hours of Mathe- 
matics electives, CH 105 and 106. 

Political Science A Political Science major provides the student with 
an excellent foundation for a career in government service on the local, 
state, national, and international levels; for a career in law; for gradu- 
ate school programs in Political Science, International Relations and 
Foreign Affairs; and for careers in campaign management, communica- 
tions, public relations and business. All Political Science and pre-law 
Political Science majors or minors should discuss career goals and pro- 
gram orientation with a departmental advisor at an early stage in order 
to select relevant courses in a total program. 

Potential Law and Graduate School students (in all disciplines) are 
urged to take special LSAT and GRE preparation courses available 
through the Political Science Department. 

A Political Science major is required to take a total of 30 semester 
hours in the Political Science Department, which must include PS 
121, 122, 261, 461, 462, and 499 or 500. All pre-law Political Science 
majors should take Introductory Accounting (A 111-112) as an elective 
and all others should take Statistics for Behavioral Science (Psychology 
301) or Statistics (Quantitative Analysis 216) as an elective to com- 
plete the major. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



The Institute of Law and Public Affairs has been established to pro- 
vide undergraduates with specific training in the areas of legal and 
public service. Students with an undergraduate major in any of the 
schools of the University can attain para-professional status in either 
Legal or Public Affairs by completing a minor in the Institute. The term 
"para-professional" applies to those with special training in a pro- 
fessional field but who do not yet possess the terminal degree normally 
required in the profession. In many instances the para-professional 
status is a step towards the accomplishment of the final degree. 

Legal Affairs The field of legal affairs prepares students for positions 
as office managers, administrative assistants, legal investigators, data 
researchers, legal library assistants, and legislative researchers in pri- 
vate and public law firms and agencies. Students acquire specific skills 
which will enable them to do important legal work under the super- 
vision of practicing attorneys. The legal affairs minor also prepares 
students for positions in the judicial system, and for research positions 
and clerkships in the law libraries of the state. 

Public Affairs The Public Affairs minor in the Institute of Law and 
Public Affairs is directed towards providing training for civil service 
positions at the governmental level. The goal of such training is to pro- 
vide more effective public administrators and to introduce creativity in- 
to the profession of public service. The Public Affairs minor will take a 
problem solving approach to the discipline as students will be conduct- 
ing basic in-depth research on problems of governmental agencies. 
Students in this minor will be able to develop valuable insights into the 
nature of the public process from the vantage point of the bureaucracy. 

Psychology Graduate study leading to the Master's degree is minimal 
for professional status in Psychology. A solid foundation for such 
graduate work is defined by a broadly-based liberal education. 

Major requirements, under advisement, include P 111, P 301, P 305, 
P 321, P 350 and twenty-one hours of advanced Psychology courses, 
SC 121, SC 123, SO 113, PHL 111 or 124 and one college-level mathe- 
matics course. Only two 200-level Psychology courses may be counted 
toward the major. 

Sociology Students who wish to understand the intellectual tradition 
that has focused on the description and explanation of human society 
will be interested in a sociology major. It requires a humanistic orienta- 
tion while regarding empirical research as the major means of extend- 
ing knowledge about man. It anticipates awakening insight in predicting 
social indicators. A sociology major may continue his work in graduate 
school or he may find employment in such fields as research, govern- 
mental service, personnel work, advertising, journalism and industry. 



AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



THE INSTITUTE 
OF LAW AND 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS 



49 



ARTS AND SCIENCES 



ARFA^ '^^j°^ requirements are SO 113, either 114 or 214, 250, 413 and 

MRLrtO 440, p 301 or M 128, and fifteen additional semester hours in 

QP sociology, at least 9 of which must be taken from the 300 level or 

above. A student may substitute 3 semester hours of SW credit for SO 
STUDY credits toward the major. SO 231, 311 and 320 are listed in other de- 

partments in the University schedules but are designated as com- 
parable sociology listings and may be used as credit toward the major. 



50 



Social Welfare Students who wish to go into Social Work and related 
areas may take a concentration in Social Welfare. The program trains 
students to work with people, both individually and in groups, per- 
ceiving problem situations and dealing with these in a professional 
manner. Graduates must have the knowledge, attitudes, and skills 
common to the profession at the baccalaureate level. They must also 
be aware of the overall problems confronting society today and the 
position Social Work takes in response to these problems. 

There are employment opportunities in federal, state, and private 
organizations, or the student may wish to continue his education in a 
graduate school of social work. 



Major requirements are: SO 113, 114, 250, P 301 or 
350-351, 340, 401-402, 415-416, 475. 



128, SW 220, 



Teacher Education The University offers a "Minor" program in Edu- 
cation to those students who wish to explore teaching as a profession 
during their undergraduate years. This service enables such students 
to broaden their knowledge of neighboring public school systems and 
to expand their opportunities should they decide on teaching as a 
career. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



The Education Minor offers several advantages: 

(a) students may elect these courses for credit toward their Bachelor's 

degree in their major fields, 

(b) these basic professional courses may be applied toward State of 

Connecticut Teaching Certification, 

(c) these Education courses may be incorporated into a graduate 
school program leading toward a Master's degree and the Per- 
manent Teaching Certificate in the State of Connecticut. 



World Music The program in World Music is unique. Music is studied 
as a world-wide phenomenon, not simply as defined in the Western 
European Art tradition. The student is encouraged to view music as a 
creation of all cultures and civilizations on both the folk and art levels, 
including our own urban and ethnic subcultures. Exposure to various 
musics should lead the student to specialization in a particular area 
as an upperclassman. 

Since music is a performing art, the student is expected to reach a 
satisfactory level of proficiency in either a traditional western instru- 
ment or one central to the particular culture in which he chooses to 
specialize. 

The core requirements for the major in World Music include MU 112, 
150-1, 198-9, 201-2, 251-2, 416 and 15 additional credits from 
MU 299 and above. At least three credits must be earned in MU 116. 
Although the program contains no language requirement, students are 
urged to acquaint themselves with the language of their area of 
concentration. 



AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



51 



These course requirements and those prescribed by the students' major 
department must be met by all Arts and Science students. 



chelor of Arts 




18 s.h. 
3 
3 
6 
6 


English and Humanities 

English Composition 
English Composition and Literature 
*Fine Arts 
Literature 


24 s.h. 
3 
6 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


Social Sciences 

Economics 

History, of which 3 s.h. must be either 

Western Civilization 1 or Western Civilization II 
Philosophy 
Psychology 
Sociology 
Political Science 
A course chosen from any Social Science department 


11-12 s.h. 


**Science and Mathematics 

Physics 

Chemistry 

Science 

Biology 

Mathematics 



Total 53-54 semester hours. 

* Fine Arts includes Art, Music, and Theater. 
**Students must elect at least one semester of a laboratory science with lab. 



CORE 

REQUIREMENTS — 
BACHELOR 
PROGRAMS 




BACHELOR PROGRAM 

TYPICAL 
FRESHMAN YEAR 



52 





Fall 




E113 


English Composition 


3 


HS 111, or 


Western Civi ization 1 or II 


3 


HS 112 








Foreign Language 


3 




Mathematics or Science 


3 




•Elective 


3 


PE 111 


Physical Education 1 






Spring 

E206 English Comp. & Lit. 

History 

Foreign Language 
Mathematics or Science 
•Elective 

PE 112 Physical Education II 



15 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


15 



* Choices should be determined fay the requirements of the student's major. 
Biology SC 251-252, CH 105-106, M 115-116, M 117-118, or 
M 127-128. Omit Foreign language, Elective, and HS 111-112 in fresh- 
man year. 

Economics and History PS 121, SO 113, P 111. 

Chemistry M 117, 118, CH 105, 106, German or Russian. 

Mathematics M 117, 118, 121. 

Physics CH 105, 106, iVl 117, 118, PH 150, 205, German, Frencii, or 

Russian. Omit HS 111-112 in freshman year. 

A student will be assigned an adviser in his major area before pre- 
registration for the first semester of the sophomore year. 





The Arts & Sciences Program offers a two-year college curriculum lead- 
ing to an Associate in Science degree. Although this is primarily a 
terminal program, most courses will transfer upon completion, should 
the student wish to continue for a Bachelor degree. 

This program offers a choice of majors to give the students a certain 
amount of concentration in fields in which it is felt there will be employ- 
ment opportunities throughout the nation for both men and women. The 
majors offered are Biology, Commercial and Advertising Art, Chemistry, 
General Studies, Journalism, and Occupational Safety and Health. 



ARTS & SCIENCES 



ASSOCIATE 
IN SCIENCE 
DEGREE 



Biology Concentrations in Cytology, Pre-Nursing, Pre-Pharmacy, Pre- 
Optometry, and Environmental Science. Opportunities for a student 
majoring in biology are found in industrial, academic, and govern- 
mental organizations, as well as in research and medical institutions 
and laboratories. Examples of these would be positions as environ- 
mental health and sanitation specialists, medical technologists, medical 
or scientific secretaries or librarians, cytologists, nurses or nurses' 
aides, as well as laboratory technicians and researchers in agricultural, 
biological, and medical laboratories. The greatest opportunities lie in 
the combined fields of biology and other disciplines such as, chemistry, 
sociology, physics, psychology, engineering, mathematics, and busi- 
ness. The most popular of these is the pre-medical or pre-dental pro- 
gram. An A.S. in Biology will allow a student to transfer to a School of 
Pharmacy with two years of credit toward a degree in pharmacy. 



53 



Chemistry A student majoring in chemistry will find employment 
opportunities in the areas of industry, government, and academic insti- 
tutions. Positions are available as laboratory technicians or specialists 
in chemical, medical, forensic, and environmental laboratories. An A.S. 
in chemistry also prepares a student for medical, dental, or veterinary 
schools. 



Commercial and Advertising Art This major is offered for both women 
and men who wish to obtain employment in a vast and challenging 
field. All graphic media, such as newspapers, magazines, brochures, 
company publications, and indoor and outdoor advertising displays will 
be covered. In addition, the courses will help develop the artistic talent 
of those students who are interested in art training to be used in other 
professions. 



ARTS AND SCIENCES 



ASSOCIATE 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



General Studies This major is offered for those students who wish 
a college degree of a general nature and for those students who have 
not yet decided upon a field of specialization but who, in the mean- 
time, want to start college work. 

Journalism The School of Arts and Sciences offers a minor in journal- 
ism. A curriculum built around a minor in journalism and a major in 
another Arts and Sciences area, such as English, history, political 
science, social welfare, or environmental studies will provide an excel- 
lent undergraduate education for a potential journalist. It is expected 
that new courses in journalism will include such topics as Freedom of 
Expression, Journalistic Performance, Interpretive and Editorial Writing, 
and The Copy Desk. 



54 




Biology Major 






FIRST YEAR 












Sem. 


Lab. Class 




Sem. Lab. Class 


Fall 


Hrs. 


Hrs. 


Hrs. 


Spring 


Hrs. 


Hrs. 


Hrs. 


E 113 Eng. Comp. 


3 





3 E206 


Eng. Comp. & Lit. 


3 





3 


SC 121 Biology 1 


3 





3 SC 122 


Biology II 








SC 131 Biology Lab. 1 


1 


3 





or 








CH 105 Gen. Chem. 1 






SC 123 


Human Biology 


3 





3 


w/Lab. 


4 


3 


3 SC 132 


Biol. Lab. II 


1 


3 





♦Mils Pre-Calculus Math. 






CH 106 


Gen. Chem. II 








or 








w/Lab. 


4 


3 


3 


IVI 117 Calculus 1 


3 





3 *M 116 


Survey of Calculus 








PE 111 Physical Ed. 1 








2 


or 
















— M 118 


Calculus II 


3 





3 


Total 


14 


6 


14 P 112 


Physical Ed. II 








2 










Total 


14 


6 


14 


* Mathematics sequences maj 


i be M 115-116, M 117-118, or M-127-128. 














SECOND YEAR 










SO 113 Sociology 


3 





3 


English elective 


3 





3 


SC 251 Zoology w/Lab. 


4 


3 


3 SC 252 


Botany w/Lab. 


4 


3 


3 


Biology elective 


4 


3 


3 SC 301 


Microbiology 








SC 201 Genetics 


3 





3 


with/ Lab. 


4 


3 


3 


AT 201 Painting 1 






Pill 


Psychology 


3 





3 


or 








Biology elective 


4 


3 


3 


AT 101 Studio Art 


3 





3 




— 


— 


— 



Total 



17 



15 



Total 



18 



15 



This program, with departmental permission, 
of certain goals, such as would be needed 



may be altered slightly to meet the requirements 
n preparation to enter various four-year programs. 



Chemi 


stry Major 






FIRST YEAR 












Sem. 


Lab Class 






Sem. Lab Class 




Fall 


Hrs. 


Hrs. 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 


Hrs. Hrs. 


CHIOS 


General Chem 1 








CH106 


General Chem II 








w/Lab. 


4 


3 


3 




w/Lab. 


4 


3 3 


E113 


English Comp. 


3 





3 


E206 


Eng. Comp. & 






GRIOI 


Elem. German 1 










Literature 


3 


3 




or Elective 


3 





3 


GR 102 


Elem. German II 






M117 


Calculus 1 


4 





4 




or Elective 


3 


3 


PL 111 


Philosophy 


3 





3 


M118 


Calculus II 


4 


4 


PElll 


Phys. Ed. 1 








2 


PH150 


Mech/Heat/Waves 


4 


3 3 















PE112 


Phys. Ed. II 





2 




Total 


17 


3 


18 
SECOND 


YEAR 


Total 


Is 


6 18 


CH301 


Organic Chem. 1 
w/lab. 


4 


4 


3 


CH302 


Organic Chem. II 

w/lab. 


4 


4 3 


CH211 


Quant. Anal w/lab. 


4 


4 


3 


CH341 


Instru. Methods of Anal 






English Lit-Elec. 


3 





3 




w/lab 


4 


3 3 


M203 


Calculus III 


4 





4 




English Lit-Elec. 


3 


3 




Restricted Elective 


3 





3 


HSlll 


Western Civil. 1 


3 


3 









— 





PH205 


Electromagnetism 








Total 


18 


8 


16 




Optics w/lab. 
Total 


4 
18 


3 3 

10 15 



ASSOCIATE 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



55 



ARTS AND SCIENCES 



ASSOCIATE 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



56 



Commercial and Advertising 
Art Major 







FIRST YEAR 






AT 101 
AT 211 
E113 
PElll 
PS 121 


Fall 

Introduction to Studio Art 

Design 1 

Engiisti Composition 

Physical Education 1 

American Government 

Elective 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

1 3 

3 
3 

3 
3 


AT 102 
AT 212 
E206 
Pill 
PE112 
AT 105 


Spring 

Introduction to Studio Art 1 

Design II 

Eng. Comp. & Literature 

Psychology 

Physical Education II 

Basic Drawing 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

1 3 
3 
3 
3 


3 




Total 


15 
SECOND 


YEAR 


Total 


15 


AT 312 
MK107 
EC 133 


Lettering 

Advertising & Promotion 
Prin. of Economics 1 
Literature Elective 
Science of Math. 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


AT 122 
AT 131 


Layout & Print. Tech. 
History of Art Elective 
Elective 

Literature Elective 
Science or Math. 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Total 



15 



Total 



15 



The student is expected to carry 15 credit hours per semester. A total of 60 semester hours 
is required for the degree. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



General Studies Major FIRST YEAR 

Sem. Sem. 

Fall Hrs. Spring Hrs. 

E113 English Composition 3 E206 Eng. Comp. & Lit. 3 

Pill Psychology 3 HS 111 Western Civ. I 

PElll Physical Education I or 

PS 121 American Government 3 HS 112 WesternCiv.il 3 

Foreign Language or SO 113 Sociology 3 

Elective 3 Foreign Language or 

•Elective 3 Elective 3 

— PE 112 Physical Education II 
Total 15 *Electlve 3 

Total 15 

SECOND YEAR 

Foreign Language or HS 112 Western Civ. II 

Elective 3 or 

EC 133 Prin. of Economics I 3 History Elective 3 

Literature Elective 3 Foreign Language or 

Science, or Math. 3 Elective 3 

*Elective 3 Science, or Math 3 

— *Electives 6 

Total 15 — 

Total 15 

* Students who expect to transfer to a four-year program leading to a Bachelor degree should 
complete 12 hours of science or mathematics. 

The student is expected to carry 15 credit hours per semester. A total of 60 semester hours 
is required for the degree. 



Journal 


lism Major 


FIRST YEAR 










Sen). 






Sem. 




Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 


E113 


English Composition 


3 


AT 122 


Layout & Print. Tech. 


3 


J 101 


Journalism 1 


3 


E206 


Eng. Comp. & Lit. 


3 


PElll 


Physical Education 1 





J 102 


Journalism II 


3 


PS 121 


American Government 


3 


Pill 


Psychology 


3 


HS 111 


Western Civ. 1 




PE112 


Physical Education II 







or 




HS 112 


Western Civ. II 






Western Civ. 11 


3 




or 






Elective 


3 




History Elective 


3 




Total 


15 
SECOND 


YEAR 


Total 


15 


EC 133 


Prin. of Economics 1 


3 


EC 134 


Prin. of Economics II 


3 


J 201 


News Writing & Reporting 


3 


J 202 


Advanced News Writing 




SO 113 


Sociology 


3 




and Reporting 


3 




Literature Elective 


3 




Literature Elective 


3 




Science or Math 


3 




Science or Math. 


3 











Elective 


3 




Total 


15 










Total 15 

The student is expected to carry 15 credit hours per semester. A total of 60 semester hours 
is required for the degree. The student majoring in Journalism should be able to type. 



ASSOCIATE 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



57 




ARTS AND SCIENCES 



/ v!S-^^t1?fi^ 



:.*«?«* 




SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

WARREN J. SMITH, DEAN 



Bachelor of Science Degree 



MAJORS IN: 



ACCOUNTING 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

COMMUNICATIONS 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE WITH PROGRAMS IN 

LAW ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION 

FORENSIC SCIENCE 

CORRECTIONAL ADMINISTRATION 
ECONOMICS 
FINANCE 
HOTEL, RESTAURANT, INSTITUTIONAL 

MANAGEMENT, TOURISM AND TRAVEL 
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 
MANAGEMENT SCIENCE 
MARKETING 
OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 

INCLUDING COMPUTER SCIENCE 
PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 
RETAILING 



Associate in Science Degree 



MAJORS IN: 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
CORRECTIONAL ADMINISTRATION 
HOTEL ADMINISTRATION 
LAW ENFORCEMENT 
RETAILING 



BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 



The School of Business Administration provides programs to prepare 
students for (1) several areas of business and economics, (2) the 
broad field of criminal justice, and (3) public administration. The 
courses of study combine strong professional programs with compre- 
hensive background in the liberal arts. 

The School of Business Administration considers it axiomatic that, 
over the long run, a graduate is better prepared for the business 
world when his collegiate business background has been comprehen- 
sive rather than highly specialized. Consequently, only a limited amount 
of specialization is intended in the various departmental majors. 



60 



AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



Accounting — is selected by those who wish to make this their career, 
including possibly ultimate attainment of the Certified Public Account- 
ant license. Accounting has long been recognized as a preferred route 
to management responsibilities in many fields of business. 

The student has the option of selecting the Financial Accounting Con- 
centration or the Managerial Accounting Concentration. 



Business Administration — is the field generally chosen by those stud- 
ents who have not yet developed their career objectives. 

Communications The opportunities to the graduate are unlimited. A 
career field may be chosen in any one of several media. 

Economics — is a broad field in which specialists are called for by 
industry and government particularly to staff various types of research 
activities. This major is also one that would be considered by the stu- 
dent contemplating future graduate work or attendance at law school. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Finance — is one of the business disciplines that has extensive appli- 
cation to businesses generally. 

Hotel, Restaurant, Institutional Management, Tourism and Travel — 

is selected by those who wish to make this their career. There are nu- 
merous opportunities available to the graduate in the institutional field, 
restaurant management, hotel administration, and tourism. 

International Business A comparatively new field of study dealing 
with the problems of developing and adopting business practices for 
the purpose of operating within different economies, different political 
systems and different cultures. Selected by students who wish to make 
this their career. 



Management Science — this provides the student with an understanding 
of the business organization and the concepts underlying the manage- 
rial processes. The graduate has numerous opportunities available to 
him in many fields of business. 

Marketing — is a w/idely recognized phase of business that presents 
unmatched opportunities to the qualified graduate, depending on 
whether his interests are in the selling, managing, or analytical phases. 

Operations Management — is a growing profession. Its practices make 
increased use of quantitative analysis in the scientific management of 
business. Students with specific interest in data processing usually 
select this field. 

Personnel Management — a discipline offering excellent career oppor- 
tunities for both men and women. Majoring in personnel management 
affords the student an opportunity to obtain a solid foundation in the 
behavioral sciences within a business administration program. 

Public Administration The Public Administration program is designed 
to prepare the students for careers in public affairs (government service, 
politics), governmental research, graduate school, or to give the student 
an insight, generally, into the various governmental organizations, 
functions, and methodology which are used to both determine and 
provide the services to the people. 

On the premise that the basic skills required in managerial positions 
in public service have much in common with those of the manager 
in private industry, the student follows much the same program as 
other business students during the first two years. 

For his junior and senior years, the student majoring in Public Admin- 
istration will arrange his program under the guidance of his Depart- 
mental Chairman, so as to meet his defined objectives. A wide selection 
of courses is available in the School of Business Administration and 
the School of Engineering. 

Retailing — is selected by those who wish to make this field of business 
their career. The options available to the graduate are varied, offering 
opportunities in selling, merchandising and advertising. 

Criminal Justice Four-year bachelor degree programs in criminal 
justice are offered. They are planned for high school graduates inter- 
ested in any of the many careers in the administration and operation 
of criminal justice agencies on the federal, state, and local levels of 
government. Three programs are offered: Law Enforcement, Forensic 
Science, and Corrections. 



AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



61 




AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



Law Enforcement This program prepares students for administrative 
careers with federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies or 
public and private security forces. Law enforcement administration 
is concerned with the activities and behavior of people in terms of 
maintaining law and order, providing needed services, and protecting 
life and property. The program provides basic studies in the liberal 
arts and public administration as well as courses pertaining to law 
enforcement administration and criminal justice. 



62 



Forensic Science This program prepares students for careers as 
forensic scientists, criminologists, or evidence technicians m the field of 
criminal investigation and identification. The program includes basic 
studies in the natural sciences, liberal arts, and public administration 
as well as courses in forensic science and criminal justice. 



Corrections This program prepares students for administrative ca- 
reers with federal, state, local, and private correctional agencies. Cor- 
rectional administration is concerned with the institutional and non- 
institutional treatment of offenders. The program provides basic studies 
in the liberal arts and public administration as well as courses pertain- 
ing to correctional administration and criminal justice. 



CREDITING 
EXAMS 



Applicants from the Armed Services and other mature individuals are 
invited to inquire about the possibility of crediting examinations in 
lieu of certain course work. 



PROGRAMS '^^^ typical degree programs in the various majors follow. If a student 

has special interests not provided for by these programs, an endeavor 
will be made to prepare a specific program for him (e.g. combined 
programs in Business and Chemistry). 

The programs provided in the School of Business are divided into three 
general categories: (1) the business majors which are presented next 
below, (2) the programs in law enforcement, and (3) the program in 
public administration. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



All business students take similar core courses in business, the 
allied social sciences, and certain other liberal arts subjects. Then 
several courses are taken in the major business field selected by the 
student. The program is rounded out with electives. 



In cooperation with Soutliern Connecticut State College, students in 
any program within the School of Business Administration at the Uni- 
versity of New Haven may take up to twelve semester hours of advanced 
courses in economics offered by the Department of Economics at 
Southern Connecticut State College. The twelve semester hours of 
courses taken at Southern Connecticut State College will constitute part 
of a student's regular work toward his or her degree at the University 
of New Haven. 



COOPERATIVE 
PROGRAM IN 
ECONOMICS 



Courses offered by the Department of Economics at Southern Connecti- 
cut State College which may be of particular interest to University of 
New Haven students include urban economics, managerial economics, 
economics seminar, and all other advanced economics courses. 



University of New Haven students interested in taking courses offered 
by the Department of Economics at Southern Connecticut State College 
will be required to register at the University of New Haven with their 
departmental advisor. During spring and fall registration, faculty ad- 
visors and the Office of the Dean, School of Business, will have avail- 
able the catalog of Southern Connecticut State College and a current 
schedule of courses offered by the Department of Economics at South- 
ern Connecticut State College. 



63 




BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



64 



Full-time students at the University of New Haven taking one or more 
courses at Southern Connecticut State College in any semester must 
register at the University of New Haven and pay the University's current 
tuition charge for full-time day undergraduate students. 

MINORS ^^^ student majoring in Business Administration may select one of 

the following mmors: 

Applied Design Materials Engineering 

Art Mathematics 

Biology Mechanical Engineering 

Chemistry Music Appreciation 

Civil Engineering Philosophy 

Communications Physics 

Economics Political Science 

Electrical Engineering Psychology 

English Public Administration 

History Sociology 

(a) The only transfer credit that can be recognized as part of a minor 
is a course considered to be a prerequisite for the minor, (i.e. 
Pill Psychology). With the exception of the prerequisite for the 
minor that may be required in the core, the student majoring in 
the School of Business Administration will not be allowed any more 
courses than required in the specific minor field. Should he or she 
enroll for an extra course in the minor, the course will be treated 
as excess credit. Though a minor is granted because it offers a 
concentration within a discipline above the survey level, the stu- 
dent as a business major must maintain as varied a selection of 
liberal arts courses as may be available to him exclusive of elec- 
tives used to fill the minor requirements. Electives that remain 
after the student has completed his minor must be taken in other 
disciplines. 

(b) Only one minor will be recognized. 

(c) A student may change his minor. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 







FIRST 


YEAR 






Sem. 






Fall 


Hrs. 




E113 


English Composition 


3 


E206 


HS112 


Western Civilization II 


3 


HS114 


LA 101 


Business Law 


3 




QA118 


Business Mathematics 1 


3 (3){b) 


QA128 




Sociology or Psychology 




IV1K105 




or Political Science 


3 


IE 105 


PElll 


Physical Education 1 





PE112 




Total 


15 

SECOND 








YEAR 


Alll 


Intro. Accounting 1 


3 


A 112 


EC 133 


Principles of Economics 
Literature or Philosophy 


1 3 


EC 134 




or Fine Arts 


3 




QA216 


Statistics 


3(0 


MG 125 




Science 


3 





Total 



15 



Sem. 

Spring Hrs. 

Composition & Literature 3 
Economic History of the 

Western World 3 

Quantitative Techniques 3 

Marketing 3 

Technical Data Processing 3 

Physical Education II 

Total 15 



Intro. Accounting II 3 

Principles of Economics II 3 
Literature or Philosophy 

or Fine Arts 3 

Management & Organization 3 

Science 3 

Total 15 



CORE COURSES 



Notes: (a) Subject to placement examination by the School of Business. 

(b) M 115 Mathematical Analysis I and M 116 Mathematical Analysis II may be sub- 
stituted for the QA 118 and QA 128 sequence. 

(c) F!etailing, Communications, and Hotel Management majors will take QA 314 Research 
Techniques in Business. 

Programs listed immediately following this page detail course requirements for third and 
fourth years only. First and second year course requirements are the same as the "Core 
Courses" listed above. Other programs have varying first and second year course require- 
ments and are listed separately near the end of the section. 



65 



Before the end of the sophomore year a student will select a business 
major and a minor in consultation with the appropriate chairman or 
other designated advisor. The degree program for the student's third 
and fourth years will be prepared in consultation with an advisor. This 
will involve the selection of electives in addition to the required courses. 
Any University course may be used as an elective. 

Courses offered outside of the School of Business Administration or 
the Industrial Engineering Department of the School of Engineering 
shall comprise not less than 40 percent of all work taken toward 
graduation. Representative programs follow. A minimum of 120 semes- 
ter hours is required for graduation. 

The junior or senior student may be required to participate in one of 
the programs available in the School of Business Administration, such 
as the Small Business Institute or the New Products and Concepts 
Laboratory. These experiences introduce the student to the challenge 
of business realities before graduation. 




66 



BACHELOR 


Marketi 


ng 








DEGREE 


(Following 


core courses listed earlier 


in this section) 
THIRD YEAR 






PROGRAMS 






Sem. 




Sem. 






Fall 


Hrs. 


Spring 


Hrs. 




RT301 


Retailing 


3 MK316 


Sales Management 


3 




IV1G231 


Industrial Relations 


3 MK 302 


Industrial Marketing 


3 




MK315 


Marketing Management 


3 


Sociology or Psychology 








Electives 


6 


or Political Science 


3 











Electives 


6 






Total 


15 

FOURTH YEAR 


Total 


15 




MK342 


Marketing Researcti 


3 MK 107 


Advertising & Promotion 


3 




MG 510 


Managerial Economics 


3 MG 512 


Business Seminar 


3 




IB 312 


International Business 


3 


Electives 


9 






Electives 


6 








Total 



15 



Total 



15 



Operations Management 

(Following core courses listed earlier in this section) 

THIRD YEAR 







Sem. 






Sem, 




Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 


IE 233 


Cost Control 


3 


IE 503 


Operations Research 


3 


MG231 


Industrial Relations 


3 


MG 350 


Advanced Management 


3 


QA250 


Quantitative Analysis 


3 




Sociology or Psychology or 






Business Elective 


3 




Political Science 


3 




Elective 


3 




Business Elective 


3 






— 




Elective 


3 



Total 



15 



Total 



15 



FOURTH YEAR 



IE 508 Systems Analysis 
MG 510 Managerial Economics 

Business Elective 

Electives 

Total 



3 
3 
3 
6 

15 



IE 234 
MG 512 
MG550 



Production Control 
Seminar 

Business Policy 
Electives 

Total 



3 
3 
3 
6 

15 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Personnel Management 

(Following core courses listed earlier in this section) 







THIRD 


YEAR 










Sem. 






Sem 




Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 


EC 350 


Economics of Labor Rel. 


3 


IE 201 


Accident Conditions and 




IE 223 


Personnel Administration 


3 




Controls 


3 


EC 340 


Microeconomic Analysis 


3 


P212 


Business & Industrial 




P 111 


Psychology 


3 




Psychology 


3 




Elective 


3 


MG 231 


Industrial Relations 


3 











Electives 


6 




Total 


15 




Total 


15 






FOURTH YEAR 






MG550 


Business Policy 


3 


Fl 227 


Risk and Insurance 


3 


MG455 


Organizational Effectiveness 3 


IE 243 


Work Analysis 


3 


IE 106 


Safety Organization 




MG 512 


Business Seminar 


3 




and Management 


3 




Electives 


6 




Electives 


6 






— 






— 




Total 


15 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



67 



Total 



15 



Business Administration 



(Following core courses listed earlier in this section) 







THIRD 


YEAR 










Sem. 






Sem 




Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 


IB 312 


International Business 


3 


Fl 227 


Risk and Insurance 


3 


Fl 113 


Finance 


3 


EC 340 


Microeconomic Analysis 


3 


MG350 


Advanced Mgt. 


3 


MK315 


Marketing Management 


3 




Sociology or Psychology 




MG 231 


Industrial Relations 


3 




or Political Science 


3 




Elective 


3 




Elective 


. 3 


















Total 


15 




Total 


. 15 
FOURTH 


YEAR 






MG455 


Organizational Effectiveness 3 


MG 512 


Business Seminar 


3 


MG 510 


Managerial Economics 


3 


Fl 345 


Financial Institutions & 






Electives 


9 




Capital Markets 


3 











Business Elective 


3 




Total 


15 




Electives 


6 



Total 



15 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



68 



BACHELOR 


Economics 








DEGREE 


(Following 


core courses listed earlier in 


this section) 
THIRD YEAR 






PROGRAMS 






Sem. 




Sem. 






Fall 


Hrs. 


Spring 


Hrs. 




EC 336 


Money and Banking 


3 EC 340 


Microeconomic Analysis 


3 






Economics Electives 


6 


Economics Elective 


3 






Electives 


6 


Sociology or Psychology 










— 


or Political Science 


3 






Total 


15 

FOURTH YEAR 


Electives 
Total 


6 

15 




EC 445 


Macroeconomic Analysis 


3 MG 512 


Business Seminar 


3 




EC 320 


Mathematical Methods in 




Economics Electives 


6 






Economics 


3 


Electives 


6 






Electives 


9 








Total 



15 



Total 



15 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 




Finance 












BACHELOR 


(Following 


core courses listed earlier in 


this section) 
THIRD YEAR 






DEGREE 






Sem. 






Sem. 


PROGRAMS 




Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 




EC44S 


Macroeconomic Analysis 


3 


Fl 345 


Financial Institutions & 






Fl 113 


Finance 


3 




Capital Markets 


3 




Fl 214 


Real Estate 


3 


Fl 230 


Investments 


3 




A 221 


Intermediate Accounting 1 
Elective 


3 
3 


A 222 


Inter-nediate Accounting II 
Sociology or Psychology 
or Political Science 


3 
3 






Total 


15 




Elective 


3 





Total 



15 



FOURTH YEAR 



EC 314 Public Finance 
MG 510 Managerial Economics 
QA 333 Advanced Statistics 
Electives 

Total 



3 
3 
3 
6 

15 



Fl 229 
MG 512 
Fl 227 



Financial Management 3 

Business Seminar 3 

Risk and Insurance 3 

Electives 6 

Total 15 



69 



international Business 

(Following core courses listed earlier in this section) 

THIRD YEAR 



EC 342 
IB 312 
Fl 350 


Fall 

International Economics 
International Business 
International Finance 
**IB Elective 
'Elective/Language 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


MG350 
IB 313 
EC 440 


Spring 

Advanced Mgt. 
International Marketing Mgt 
Economic Development 

**IB Elective 

'Elective/Language 


Sem 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 




Total 


15 




Total 


15 






FOURTH YEAR 






IB415 
IB 321 


Comparative Management 
Operation of the Multi- 
national Firm 
Literature, Philosophy 
or Fine Arts 
**IB Elective 
*Elective/Language 


3 

3 

3 
3 
3 


IB 549 


International Business 

Policy 
Psychology, Sociology or 

Political Science 
Literature, Philosophy or 

Fine Arts 
Electives 


3 
3 

3 

6 




Total 


15 




Total 


15 


*Language requirement is optional 
**To be approved by the Chairman. 











BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



70 



BACHELOR 


Manag 


ement Science 










DEGREE 


(Following core courses listed earlier in 


this section) 
THIRD YEAR 






PROGRAMS 






Sein. 






Sem 






Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 




MG324 


Development of 




IB 312 


International Business 


3 






Management Thought 


3 


MG350 


Advanced Management 


3 




MG 231 


Industrial Relations 


3 


MK315 


Marketing Management 


3 




Fl 113 


Business Finance 
Sociology or Psychology 
or Political Science 


3 
3 




Business Elective 
Elective 


3 
3 






Elective 


3 




Total 


. 15 






Total 


15 
FOURTH 


YEAR 








IB 415 


Comparative Management 


3 


iVIG 550 


Business Policy 


... 3 




IVIG455 


Organizational Effectiveness 3 


MG 515 


Readings Seminar In 






MG 510 


Managerial Economics 


3 




Management 


3 






Electives 


6 


MG512 


Business Seminar 
Business Elective 


3 
3 






Total 


15 




Elective 


3 



Total 



15 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 




Communications 







FIRST YEAR 










Sent. 






Sem 




Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 


E113 


English Composition 


3 


E206 


Comp. and Lit. 


3 


PS 121 


American Government 


3 




Psychology or Sociology 


3 




Psychology or Sociology 


3 


HS114 


Economic History of the 




HS112 


Western Civ. II 


3 




Western World 


3 




Science/ Math 


3 




Science/ Math 


3 











Elective 


3 



Total 



15 



Total 



15 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



MG 125 Management & Organization 
EC 133 Principles of Economics I 
CO 101 Fundamentals of 

Communications 3 

Literature or Fine Arts 3 

Elective 3 

Total 15 



SECOND YEAR 

3 PA 301 

3 

CO 206 
CO 102 



AT 211 



Principles of Public 

Administration i 

Sound Workshop 3 
Problems of 

Communications 3 

Literature or Fine Arts 3 

Design 3 

Total 15 



71 



THIRD YEAR 



CO 210 Film Making Theory and 

Practice 
CO 208 Radio Broadcasting 
SO 318 Political Sociology 

Restrictive Elective 

Elective 

Total 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



CO 220 
PL 111 
SO 418 



Film Production 

Philosophy 
Public Opinion and 
Social Pressures 
Restrictive Elective 
Elective 

Total 



3 
3 

3 
3 
3 

15 



P 321 Social Psychology 

QA 314 Research Techniques in 
Business 

Restrictive Electives . 

Elective 

Total 



FOURTH YEAR 

3 

3 
6 
3 

15 



Restrictive Electives 6 

Electives 9 

Total 15 



The student will take 5 courses as follows: CO 101, CO 102, CO 208, CO 210 and CO 220. In 
addition he would take 6 restricted electives determined by his advisor. The courses might be 
T. V. Production 1 and 2, Dramatic Writing, Laws of Communication, Government Regulations of 
Media, Comparative Broadcast Systems. These courses emphasize field work. The program allows 
room for a minimum of 6 elective courses. These courses could be taken from any division 
under the guidance of an advisor. They would be courses related to the student's major. Thus 
a student would have 33 hours in his major and a minimum of 18 hours of free electives. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



Financial Accounting Major 



Fall 

E 113 English Composition 

QA 118 Business Mathematics I 
EC 133 Principles of Economics I 

Psychology, Sociology, or 
Political Science 

Science 
PE 111 Physical Education 

Total 



FIRST YEAR 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 

3 
3 


15 



E206 
QA 128 
EC 134 



PE 112 



Spring 

English Comp. & Literature 

Quantitative Techniques 

Principles of Economics II 

Science 

Psychology, Sociology, or 

Political Science 
Physical Education 

Total 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 
3 

3 


15 



SECOND YEAR 



72 



A 111 Introductory Accounting I 3 

LA 101 Business Law I 3 

QA 216 Statistics 3 

HS 112 Western Civilization II 3 

MG 125 Management & Organization 3 

Total 15 



A 112 
LA 102 
MK 105 
IE 105 

HS 114 



Introductory Accounting II 3 

Business Law II 3 

Marketing 3 
Introduction to 

Computers/COBOL 3 
Economic History of the 

Western World 3 

Total 15 



THIRD YEAR 



A 221 Intermediate Accounting 

A 223 Cost Accounting 1 

Fl 113 Business Finance 

Literature, Philosophy, or 
Fine Arts 

Elective 

Total 



3 
3 
3 

3 
3 

15 



A 222 
A 224 
Fl 230 



Intermediate Accounting 
Cost Accounting 11 
Investments 
Literature, Philosophy, or 

Fine Arts 
Elective 



Total 



3 
3 
3 

3 
3 

15 



FOURTH YEAR 



A 331 Advanced Accounting I 

A 333 Auditing I 

A 335 Income Tax Procedures 

Elective 

Elective 



Total 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



A 332 
A 334 
A 336 



Advanced Accounting II 

Auditing II 

Income Tax Procedures II 

Elective 

Elective 



Total 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Criminal Justice — 

Correctional Administration Major 







FIRST YEAR 










Sem. 






Sem. 




Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 


CJ 101 


Intro, to Criminal Justice 


3 


CJ 102 


Criminal Law 


3 


E 113 


English Composition 


3 


E206 


English Comp. & Literature 


3 


SO 113 


Sociology 


3 


CJ 104 


Intro, to Police & Law 




P 111 


Psychology 


3 




Enforcement 


3 


PS 121 


American Government 


3 


CJ 107 


Intro, to Corrections 


3 











Restricted Elective— Math 


3 




Total 


15 




Total 


15 






SECOND YEAR 






CJ205 


Interpersonal Relations 


3 


CJ218 


Criminal Procedures II 




CJ 209 


Correctional Treatment 






& Evidence 


3 




Programs 


3 


SO 250 


Research Methods 


3 


CJ 217 


Criminal Procedures 1 


3 


P315 


Psychology of Learning 


3 


CJ221 


Juvenile Delinquency 


3 


PS 122 


State and Local Govern- 






Science Elective w/Lab 


4 




ment and Politics 


3 






— 




Science Elective w/Lab 


4 




Total 


16 
THIRD 


YEAR 


Total 


16 


CJ 300 


History of Criminal Justice 3 


CJ 301 


Group Dynamics in Crimina 


1 


CJ 302 


Behaviorism: Applications 


in 




Justice 


3 




Criminal Justice 


3 


CJ 309 


Probation and Parole 


3 


PA 301 


Public Administration 


3 


CJ 311 


Criminology 


3 


PS 332 


Constitutional Law 


3 


IE 346 


Statistical Analysis 


3 




Restricted Elective 


3 


P 336 


Abnormal Psychology 


3 




Total 


15 
FOURTH 


YEAR 


Total 


15 


CJ408 


Correctional Counseling 


3 


CJ 501 


Internship or Restricted 




IE 105 


Introduction to 






Elective 


3 




Computers/ COBOL 


3 


IE 507 


Systems Analysis 


3 




Restricted Elective 


3 




Restricted Elective 


3 




Restricted Elective 


3 




Elective 


3 




Elective 


3 




Elective 


3 




Total 


15 




Total 


. 15 



TOTAL: 122 Semester Hours. 
Day courses offered by the Department of Criminal Justice on the main campus in West 
Haven meet either on Tuesday and Thursday or Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Evening 
courses offered on the main campus meet one evening each week from 7:00 to 9:45 p.m. 
Extension courses conducted in Norwalk, New London, and Plainville generally meet one 
evening each week from 7:00 to 9:45 p.m. 

However, a number of courses conducted on the main campus and extension courses in 
Norwalk, New London, and Plainville are offered on a special basis one day each week. Under 
this arrangement, the course meets one morning each week from 9:00 to 11:45 a.m. and 
again the same evening from 7:00 to 9:45 p.m. Students may attend either lecture that week 
depending upon their work schedule. 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



73 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



74 



BACHELOR 
DEGREE 


Criminal Justice — 
Forensic Science Major 


FIRST YEAR 






PROGRAMS 


E 113 
CJ 101 
SC 121 
SC 131 
SC 135 
CH 105 


Fall 

English Composition 

Intro, to Criminal Justice 

Biology 1 

Biology Lab. 1 

Earth Sciences 

General Chemistry 1 w/Lab 

Total 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
. 4 

17 
SECOND 


E206 
CJ 102 
CJ 104 

SC 123 
SC 132 
CH 106 

YEAR 


Spring 

English Comp. & Literatur* 
Criminal Law 
Intro, to Police & 

Law Enforcement 
Human Biology 
Biology Lab. II 
General Chemistry II w/Lab 

Total 


Sem 
Hrs. 

! 3 
3 

3 
3 

1 
. 4 

17 




PH 103 
PH 105 
M 127 
CH301 
CJ 201 
CJ 219 


General Physics 1 
General Physics Lab. 1 
Finite Mathematics 
Organic Chem. w/Lab. 
Prin. of Criminal Invest. 
Evidence 


3 
1 
3 
4 
3 
3 


PH 104 
PH 106 
M 128 
CH 302 
CJ 215 
SO 113 


General Physics II 
General Physics Lab. II 
Elementary Statistics 
Organic Chem. w/Lab. 
Intro, to Forensic Science 
Sociology 


3 
1 
3 

4 
3 
3 






Total 


17 
THIRD 


YEAR 


Total 


17 




CJ 300 
P 111 
CJ303 
SC303 
CH211 


History of Criminal Justice 

Psychology 

Forensic Science Lab. 1 

Histology w/Lab. 

Quant. Analysis w/Lab. 


3 
3 
3 

4 
4 


CJ 311 
CJ 304 
SC 503 
SC362 
SC320 


Criminology 

Forensic Science Lab. II 
Pathology w/Lab. 
Biochemistry II w/Lab. 
Forensic Medicine 


3 
3 
4 
4 
3 






Total 


17 
FOURTH 


YEAR 


Total 


17 




CH351 
SC304 

SC 519 
SC 515 


Qual. Org. Chem. w/Lab. 
Immunology & Serology 

w/Lab. 
Pharmacology w/Lab. 
Biophysics 1 


4 

4 
4 
3 


CH 341 

SC521 
SC 509 

PH 201 


Instrumental Methods of 

Analysis w/Lab. 
Toxicology w/Lab. 
Scientific Photographic 

Documentation 
Tech. in Nuclear Physics 


4 
4 

3 
2 



Total 



15 



TOTAL: 130 Semester Hours 



Total 



13 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Criminal Justice — 

Law Enforcement Administration 



lajor 



CJ 101 
E 113 
SO 113 
P 111 
PS 121 



CI 201 

CJ 205 
CJ 217 
CJ221 



CJ300 
PA 301 
PS 332 



Fall 

Intro, to Criminal Justice 

English Composition 

Sociology 

Psychology 

American Government 

Total 



Principles of Criminal 

Investigation 
Interpersonal Relations 
Criminal Procedures I 
Juvenile Delinquency 
Science Elective w/Lab. 



Total 



FIRST YEAR 



Sent. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



CJ 102 
E206 
CJ 104 

CJ 107 



SECOND YEAR 



CJ 215 
CJ 218 

SO 250 



16 
THIRD YEAR 



History of Criminal Justice 3 CJ 301 

Public Administration 3 

Constitutional Law 3 CJ 311 

Restricted Elective 3 P 336 

Elective 3 IE 346 

Total 15 



FOURTH YEAR 



Sem. 
Spring Hrs. 

Criminal Law 3 

English Comp. & Literature 3 
Intro, to Police & Law 

Enforcement 3 

Intro, to Corrections 3 

Restricted Elective — Math 3 

Total 15 



Intro, to Forensic Science 
Criminal Procedures II 

& Evidence 
Research Methods 
Science Elective w/Lab. 
Elective 



Total 



3 
3 

4 
3 

16 



Group Dynamics in Criminal 

Justice 3 

Criminology 3 

Abnormal Psychology 3 

Statistical Analysis 3 

Elective 3 

Total 15 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



75 



CJ402 
IE 105 



Police-Community-Relations 
Introduction to 

Computers/COBOL 
Restricted Elective 
Elective 
Elective 



Total 



3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



CJ 501 

IE 507 



Internship or Restricted 

Elective 
Systems Analysis 
Restricted Elective 
Elective 
Elective 

Total 



TOTAL: 122 Semester Hours 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



Associate Degree Programs Successful completion of tine first two 
years of one of the programs offered by the Department of Criminal 
Justice with a minimum quality point average of 2.00 qualifies the 
student for the Associate in Science in either Law Enforcement Admin- 
istration, Forensic Science, or Correctional Administration. 



ASSOCIATE 
DEGREE PROGRAMS 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



Hotel, Restaurant, Institutional Management, Tourism and Travel 



rail 

E 113 English Composition 

HM 101 Laws of Inn-keeping 
HM 103 Principles of Hotel 
Management 
Math 

Sociology or Psychology or 
Political Science 

Total 



FIRST YEAR 




Sem. 


Sem. 


Hrs. 


Spring Hrt. 


3 E 220 


Report Writing 3 


3 MG 105 


Marketing 3 


HM 104 


Procedures & Techniques in 


3 


Hotel Management 3 


3 


Math 3 


IE 105 


*lntro. to Computers (COBOL) 3 



Total 



15 



15 



76 



A 111 Introductory Accounting 

EC 133 Principles of Economics 

"Science 
Fl 113 Business Finance 

HM 165 Tourism 

Total 



SECOND YEAR 

A 112 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



MK 107 
HM 150 
MG 125 



Introductory Accounting II 3 

Advertising & Promotion 3 

"Science 3 
Management Decision 

Making 3 

Management & Organization 3 

Total 15 



THIRD YEAR 



M 302 Purchasing & Control 
227 Risk & Insurance 

Literature or Philosophy or 

Fine Arts 
Hotel Management Elective 
Elective 

Total 



3 
3 

3 
3 
3 

15 



A 342 
Fl 230 



Management Accounting 3 

Investments 3 
Sociology or Psychology or 

History 3 

Hotel Management Elective 3 
Elective or Foreign 

Language 3 

Total 15 



EC 350 Economics of Labor 

Relations 
MK 316 Sales Management 

Hotel Management Elective 

Electives 

Total 



FOURTH YEAR 

HM 512 



3 
3 
3 
6 

15 



HM 411 



Seminar in Hotel 

Management 3 

Analysis of Design Systems 3 

Hotel Management Elective 3 

Electives 6 

Total 15 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



* Students may Substitute HM 410. 
** SC 115-116 Biology is recommended. 

Hotel Management Electives are to be chosen from the areas of Hotel Administration, Restau- 
rant Management, Institutional Management, Tourism and Travel. 



Manag( 


3rial Accounting 










BACHELOR 






FIRST YEAR 
Sem. 




Sem. 


DEGREE 


E 113 


Fall 

English Composition 


Hrs. 

3 


E206 


Spring 

English Composition & 


Hrs. 


PROGRAMS 


QA118 


Business Mathematics 1 


3 




Literature 


3 




EC 133 


Principles of Economics 1 


3 


QA 128 


Quantitative Techniques 


3 






Psychology, Sociology, or 




EC 134 


Principles of Economics II 


3 






Political Science 


3 




Science 


3 






Science 


3 




Psychology, Sociology, or 






PE 111 


Physical Education 







Political Science 


3 











PE 112 


Physical Education 









Total 


15 
SECOND 


YEAR 


Total 


15 




A 111 


introductory Accounting 1 


3 


A 112 


Introductory Accounting II 


3 




LA 101 


Business Law 1 


3 


MK 105 


Marketing 


3 




QA216 


Statistics 


3 


IE 105 


Introduction to 






HS 112 


Western Civilization II 


3 




Computers/COBOL 


3 




MG 125 


Management & Organization 3 


HS 114 


Economic History of the 










— 




Western World 


3 






Total 


15 
THIRD 


YEAR 


Literature, Philosophy, or 
Fine Arts 

Total 


3 

15 




A 221 


Intermediate Accounting 1 


3 


A 222 


Intermediate Accounting II 


3 




A 223 


Cost Accounting 1 


3 


A 224 


Cost Accounting II 


3 




Fl 113 


Business Finance 
Literature, Philosophy, 


3 


Fl 229 
MG 350 


Financial Management 
Advanced Management 


3 






or Fine Arts 


3 




Theory 


. 3 






Elective 


3 




Elective 


3 






Total 


15 




Total 


15 


■■■P^ -. 






FOURTH YEAR 






^E 


A 335 


Income Tax Procedures 1 


3 


A 336 


Income Tax Procedures II 


3 


m^mfk^' 


A 333 


Auditing 1 


3 


A 339 


Managerial Accounting 


3 


^^m ■ 


A 331 


Advanced Accounting 1 


3 


MG 510 


Managerial Economics 


3 


^^ ^^ 




Elective 


3 




Elective 


3 


\ ^H 




Elective 


3 




Elective 


3 


\ ^M 



Total 



15 



Total 



15 



77 




BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



Public Administration 



E113 



PE 111 





FIRST YEAR 








Sem. 






Sem. 


Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 


English Composition 


3 


E206 


Composition & Literature 


3 


Science 


3 


EC 300 


Economic History of 




Math. 


3 




the U. S. 


3 


Sociology or Psychology 


6 




•Science 


3 


Physical Education 1 







Math. 


3 







IE 105 


Introduction to 




Total 


15 




Computers/COBOL 


3 






PE 112 


Physical Education II 






Total 



15 



78 



A 111 Introductory Accounting 

EC 133 Principles of Economics 
PS 121 American Government 
QA 314 Research Techniques in 

Business 
LA 101 Business Law 

Total 



SECOND YEAR 



3 
3 
3 

3 
3 

15 



A 114 
EC 134 



PS 216 

MG 125 



Municipal Accounting 3 

Principles of Economics II 3 
Literature or Philosophy 

or Fine Arts 3 

Urban Government 3 

Management & Organization 3 

Total 15 



PA 301 Public Administration 
EC 314 Public Finance 
Electives 

Total 



THIRD YEAR 



3 
3 
9 

15 



PA 302 
PA 390 
PA 307 



Procedures in Public Admin. 3 

Administrative Law 3 

Urban & Regional Problems 3 

Electives 6 



Total 



15 



PA 408 Collective Bargaining in the 

Public Sector 
PA 320 Municipal Finance and 

Budgeting 
Electives 



FOURTH YEAR 

PA 490 



3 
9 

15 



PA 512 



Prin. & Practices of Public 

Health Administration 3 

Seminar in Public Admin. 3 

Electives 9 



Total 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Total 
SC 121-122 Biology with lab. is recommended. 

TOTAL: 120 Semester Hours 



15 



Retailing 







FIRST YEAR 










Seiti. 






Sem. 




Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 


E113 


English Composition 


3 


E206 


Composition & Literature 


3 


HS112 


Western Civilization II 


3 


HSn4 


Economic History of the 




LA 101 


Business Law 1 


3 




Western World 


3 




Math 


3 


MK 105 


Principles of Marketing 


3 




Sociology, Psychology or 






Math 


3 




Political Science 


3 


IE 105 


Introduction to 




PE 111 


Physical Education 1 







Computers/ COBOL 


3 






— 


PE 112 


Physical Education II 






Total 



15 



Total 



15 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



A 111 Introductory Accounting I 

EC 133 Principles of Economics I 
MK 107 Advertising & Promotion 
QA 314 Research Techniques in 
Business 
Science 

Total 



SECOND YEAR 



3 
3 
3 

3 
3 

15 



A 112 
EC 134 
RT 121 
MG 125 



Introductory Accounting II 3 

Principles of Economics II 3 

Retailing 3 

Management & Organization 3 

Science 3 

Total 15 



79 



THIRD YEAR 



RT 209 Retail Advertising & Sales 

Promotion 
RT 212 Textiles 
MG 231 Industrial Relations 
Electives 

Total 



3 
3 
3 
6 

15 



RT215 
RT213 



Retail Credit Management 3 
Furniture & Apparel 

Accessories .- 3 

Sociology, Psychology, or 

Political Science 3 

Electives 6 

Total 15 



RT 303 Fashions in Retailing 
Literature, Philosophy or 
Fine Arts 

MG 510 Managerial Economics 
Electives 

Total 



FOURTH YEAR 



3 
3 
6 

15 



RT310 
MG 512 



Retail Merchandise Mgmt. 3 

Seminar 3 

Internship 3 

Electives 6 

Total 15 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

THOMAS C. WARNER, JR., DEAN 



Bachelor of Science Degree 

MAJORS IN: 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 
MATERIALS ENGINEERING 
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY 



Associate in Science Degree 

MAJORS IN: 

ENGINEERING SCIENCE 
ENGINEERING 
AERONAUTICAL TECHNOLOGY 



ENGINEERING 



An applicant for admission to the Engineering Programs should be a 
graduate of a secondary school of approved standing and should 
present 15 acceptable units of secondary school work. These should 
include 4 units of English, 2 units of algebra, 1 of plane geometry, 
1/2 of trigonometry, and 1 unit each of physics and a second science. 
Deficiencies in English, mathematics, and/or science may be satisfied 
by summer school attendance, or by an extension of the stated curricu- 
lum for one or two semesters chosen to fit the student's need. 



ADMISSION 
REQUIREMENTS 



Satisfactory placement in tests covering scholastic aptitude, mathe- 
matics, and English, as given by the College Entrance Examination 
Board (S.A.T.) or American College Testing Program (A.C.T.), is 
required. 



82 



MATRICULATION 



Matriculation for Bachelor's Degree Students who have completed at 
least two semesters or equivalent (30 academic credit hours) with a 
minimum quality point ratio of 2.00 may apply for matriculation for 
the Bachelor's degree. 



Admission will be limited to applicants who have given evidence of 
capacity and motivation adequate for upper division work as deter- 
mined by the chairman of the department. 

A cumulative quality point ratio of at least 2.00 is required in a 
Bachelor of Science student's major field. 



PROFESSIONAL 
ACCREDITATION 



Professional Accreditation The School of Engineering's Civil, Electri- 
cal, Industrial and Mechanical Engineering- curricula are accredited 
by the Engineers' Council for Professional Development (ECPD). 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Civil Engineering Bachelor of Science Program: The continued ARFA^ 

rapid growth of the nation's and the world's economies requires the nixCMO 

expenditure of billions of dollars annually for the design and construe- QC 

tion of new facilities for commercial, industrial, institutional, and resi- 
dential buildings, transportation systems of all types, water supply, STUDY 

and sanitary engineering projects. A major area for future develop- 
ment is pollution control of all types; Civil Engineers will play an im- 
portant role in this field. The student is exposed to these and other 
areas and, upon the completion of the prescribed four-year curriculum, 
receives the Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering. 

Electrical Engineering Bachelor of Science Program: Electrical En- 
gineering is fundamentally concerned with energy and information. The 
principles of electrical phenomena are applied to the generation, dis- 
tribution and control of energy. Information systems including com- 
puters, radio and television communications systems, as well as ap- 

paratus for data processing, are a result of the application of electrical q3 

phenomena to specific tasks. Examples abound of these activities and 
include the nuclear power plant, the high voltage transmission line, 
the automated manufacturing plant, the digital computer, and the satel- 
lite communications system. 

The principle function of the graduate Electrical Engineer is to design 
apparatus and systems. He often develops new concepts and proced- 
ures by applying well established design principles to new situations or . 
by the discovery of basic phenomena having immediate technological 
application. There are many instances in which a whole new technology 
has risen from a successful research effort. The electronic hand calcu- 
lator, for example, is the result of design and fabrication techniques 
that have been developed only within the recent past. The integrated 
circuitry in the hand calculator is equivalent to tens of thousands of dis- 
crete transistors. 

An undergraduate program in Electrical Engineering must prepare the 
student for a professional career that will extend over a time span in 
excess of forty years after graduation. Consequently, in a field where 
new developments occur at a continuous and rapid rate, it is impera- 
tive that the new graduate be thoroughly trained in basic principles 
which do not change and which form the foundation of Electrical En- 
gineering. The program of studies at the University of New Haven in- 
cludes a balanced concentration on basic engineering analysis and de- 
sign principles. Modern applications of these techniques are presented 
in our laboratory and design courses. Since the origins of engineering 
methods are based in the sciences of Chemistry, Mathematics, and 
Physics, courses in these areas are an important part of the program. engineering 



AREAS 
OF 



84 



The digital computer is of great importance in engineering for analysis 
and design. Electrical Engineering students become competent in the 
use of computers for numerical applications and optimizing engineer- 
ing design. The computer is also studied as an element in a system'' 
^JUQY where it is used to monitor and control complex industrial processes. 

Electrical Engineering students should possess good analytical abilities 
including sound mathematical competence. They should also have a 
natural curiosity about the multitude of technical devices encountered 
in everyday life, a willingness to learn the principles that make these 
devices possible, and a desire to create new devices and methods of 
solving problems. 

Industrial Engineering Bachelor of Science Program: The study of 
Industrial Engineering prepares a student for a successful career in 
the manufacturing, research, and service industries. Based as it is on a 
broad engineering background, the professional program taken in the 
last two years offers a perspective which enables the graduate to cope 
with complex problem situations encountered in modern industry. 
Special attention is given to preparing; the student for the intelligent 
use of computers in modern industrial practice. Upon satisfactory 
completion of the prescribed four-year curriculum, graduates will 
receive the Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Engineering. 

Materials Engineering Bachelor of Science Program: Materials En- 
gineering is the systematic control of material properties such as 
strength, electrical conductivity, and corrosion resistance, through the 
understanding of the internal microscopic structure of materials. 
Practically every product, tool, machine, or building is constructed 
with careful attention paid to the materials from which it is made. 
Concrete must withstand years of heat and extreme cold. Plastics 
change dramatically with temperature. Rubber compounds support 
every automobile occupant. Metal parts must withstand heat, tension, 
compression, and fatigue. Each design and fabrication is a critical 
process. Materials Engineers are therefore respected experts whose 
decisions on quality, safety, and materials selection are of vital con- 
cern to airlines, government laboratories, steel mills, tire manufac- 
turers, and atomic energy installations. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Mechanical Engineering. Bachelor of Science Program: The tre- ARFAS 

mendously broad field of Mechanical Engineering requires a common nr\l_nO 

core of fundamental knowledge which is obtained in the required Qp 

courses in this major. Upon the completion of these required courses, in\/ 

the student, in consultation with his faculty advisor, selects restricted STUDY 

electives which will give him advanced courses in his area of greatest 
interest. Upon satisfactory completion of the prescribed four-year cur- 
riculum, graduates will receive the Bachelor of Science degree in 
Mechanical Engineering. 



Computer Technology The program in computer technology is de- 
signed to produce a graduate who has the ability to take control of a 
computer complex. Programming in several languages, and the organi- 
zation and association of computer machinery are treated in depth. A 
strong base in mathematics, physics and general business techniques 
and practices enables the graduate to work intelligently in either a busi- 
ness or engineering environment. 



85 



Associate in Science This program provides students with the first 
two years of a standard four-year engineering program. Since the 
University of New Haven's courses are fully accredited, the student will 
be in a position to transfer with advanced standing to the four-year 
Bachelor program, to the Evening Credit Division of the University. 
or to another institution. Upon satisfactory completion of the pre- 
scribed two-year curriculum in any Engineering major for the Bachelor 
of Science degree, graduates may receive the Associate in Science in 
Engineering Science degree. 

A degree of Associate in Science in Engineering is described in the 
Evening Division Bulletin. This program provides maximum flexibility 
in course requirements for the student who desires to terminate his 
studies with the Associate degree. 



Aeronautical Technology An Associate in Science degree in Aeronau- 
tical Technology is now being offered. The objective of this program is 
to provide students interested in a career as a general aviation pilot or 
as a worker in the aerospace field with college level training in aviation 
and the related technologies. Since there is an increasing demand for 
specialists with higher degrees in this field, the program is being or- 
ganized to incorporate the basic prerequisites to facilitate the trans- 
ferring of its graduates into one of the Bachelor of Science programs in 
technology. Details of the program will be furnished upon request. 



ASSOCIATE 
SCIENCE 




INTERDISCIPLINARY 
PROGRAMS 



86 



Interdisciplinary Programs The following programs offered in con- 
junction with the School of Business will be found in other sections of 
the catalog. 

Criminal Justice — Law Enforcement Administration major 
Criminal Justice — Correctional Administration major 
Business Administration — Operations Management major. 

The following programs offered in conjunction with the School of Arts 
and Sciences will be found in other sections of the catalog. 

Occupational Safety and Hygiene 
Fire Science Technology 

In addition, students in a Liberal Arts or Business major may elect a 
minor in an Engineering discipline. It is also possible for students ma- 
joring in Engineering to elect a minor in other disciplines. For details 
see the Chairmen of the departments involved. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 




The Bachelor of Science program in the various Engineering nnajors 
contains a common Freshman Year with minor variations in the Sopho- 
more Year. Students in Engineering should choose their major by the 
begmning of the Sophomore Year. Students who are accepted with de- 
ficiencies must remove them before entering the Sophomore Year. 



BACHELOR 

OF 

SCIENCE 



COMMON FRESHMAN YEAR 







Sem. 






Sem. 




Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 


E113 


English Composition 


3 


E201 


World Literature 1 


3 


'M115 


Mathematical Analysis 1 


3 


M117 


Calculus 1 


4 


HSI21 


History of Science 


3 


IE 102 


Introduction to Computers 3 


ES107 


Introduction to Engineering 3 


PH 150 


Mech/Heal/Waves 


4 


CH103 


Introduction to General 




CHllO 


Environmental Chemistry 


3 




Chemistry or 


3 


PE112 


Physical Education 11 





CHIOS 


General Chemistry 1 


(4) 






— 


=PE 111 


Physical Education 1 
Total 



15(16) 




Total 


17 


' Students 


with sufficient preparation 


will be 


placed in Coui 


rse M 117, and will take 


Course 



M 118 in the Spring Semester. 
■'Students will be placed in the appropriate course based on their preparation in Chemistry. 
"In lieu of PE 111 and PE 112 students may elect to take course PE 100 as their free elective 

in the Junior or Senior Year for 3 Semester Hours credit. 



CORE 

FRESHMAN 

YEAR 



87 



\tU«^^1 








BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



Civil Engineering 



88 







SECOND 


YEAR 










Sem. 






Sem. 




Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 


M 118 


Calculus II 


4 


M 203 


Calculus 111 


4 


E202 


World Literature II 


3 


CE202 


Mechanics of Materials 1 


3 


PH 205 


Electromagnetism & 




ME 101 


Engineering Graphics 


3 




Optics w/Lab. 


4 


ME 204 


Dynamics 


3 


CE201 


Statics 


3 




Elective, Science 


3 


IE 204 


Engineering Economics 


3 













— 




Total 


16 




Total 


17 
THIRD 


YEAR 






M 204 


Differential Equations 


3 


CE302 


Building Construction 


3 


EC 133 


Principles of Economics 1 


3 


'CE 303 


Steel Design & Construe. 


or 


CE203 


Surveying 1 


3 


XE 306 


Hydraulics 


3 


CE301 


Transportation Engrg. 


3 


CE304 


Soil Mechanics 


3 


■CE312 


Structural Analysis 1 or 




EE336 


Electrical Engrg. Systems 


3 


XE315 


Environmental Engrg. and 






Elective, Math 


3 




Sanitation 


3 









EE201 


Basic Cir./Num. Methods 
Total 


3 

18 

FOURTH 


YEAR 


Total 


15 


'CE 314 


Concrete Design & 




'CE 405 


Indeterminate Structures 


or 




Construction or 




■■CE 404 


Sanitary Engineermg 


3 


^CE 402 


Water Supply & Power 


3 


CE501 


Design Project 


3 


CE407 


Contracts & Specifications 


3 




Electives, Restricted 


6 


ME 301 


Thermodynamics 1 


3 




Elective, General Studies 


.. 3 




Elective, Restricted 


3 











Elective, General Stud. 


3 




Total 


.... 15 




Elective, Free 


3 









Total 



18 



Options and Selection of Electives 

A student may, by taking courses identified with (1), plus properly selected Restricted Electives, 
concentrate in the area of Structures. Similarly, a student may concentrate in the field of 
Sanitary Engineering by taking courses identified with (2), plus properly selected Restricted 
Electives. A balanced program may be achieved by taking courses identified with (1) and (2), 
utilizing 3 Restricted Electives and 1 Free Elective. Students should consult with the Chairman 
of the Civil Engineering Department prior to the Third Year, in order to plan his program. 
TOTAL — Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering: 128 to 132 Semester Hours. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Electrical Engineering 







SECOND 


YEAR 






EE201 
PH 205 
CE 205 
M 118 
E 202 


Fall 

Circuits/Num. Mthds. 
Electro/Optics w/Lab. 
Statics/Strength of Mtis 
Calculus II 
World Literature 11 


Setn. 
Hrs. 

3 
4 
4 
4 
3 


EE202 
EE 253 
ME 204 
M 203 


Spring 

Network Analysis 1 
EE Lab 1 
Dynamics 
Calculus 111 
Elective, Physics 


Sem 
Hrs. 

3 
2 
3 
4 
3 




Total 


18 
THIRD 


YEAR 


Total 


15 


EE301 
EE347 
EE355 
EE 361 
M 204 


Network Analysis II 
Electronics 1 
Digital Systems 1 
Electromagnetic Theory 
Differential Equations 

Total 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 
FOURTH 


EE 302 
EE 363 
EE 348 
EE349 

YEAR 


Systems Analysis 
Energy Conversion 
Electronics II 
EE Lab. 11 
Elective, Math 
Elective. Tech. 1 

Total 


3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 

17 


EE420 
EE453 
EE462 
EC 133 


Stat. Systems Anal. 
EE Lab. Ill 

Electromagnetic Waves 
Principles of Economics 1 
Elective, Tecti. II 
Elective, Gen. Studies 


3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 


IE 204 


Engineering Economics 
Elective, Tech. Ill 
Elective, Tech. IV 
Elective, Gen. Studies 
Elective, Free 

Total 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



Total 



17 



Selection of Electives 

Technical electives must be selected with the consultation of the advisor and approval of the 
Department Chairman. Generally, technical electives must be junior or senior level courses in 
the areas of engineering, mathematics or physics. 
TOTAL — Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering: 126-130 Semester Hours. 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



89 




BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



90 



Industri 


a! Engineering 


SECOND 
Sem. 


YEAR 




Sem. 




Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 


M 118 


Calculus II 


4 


M 203 


Calculus III 


4 


PH205 


Electromagnetism & 




CE202 


Mechanics of Materials 1 


3 




Optics w/Lab. 


4 


ME 204 


Dynamics 


3 


CE201 


Statics 


3 


ME 101 


Engineering Graphics 


... 3 


E202 


World Literature II 


3 




Elective, Physics 


... 3 


IE 204 


Engineering Economics 


3 






— 






— 




Total 


16 




Total 


17 
THIRD 


YEAR 






M204 


Differential Equations 




EC 133 


Princ. of Economics 1 


3 




or 




EC 350 


Economics of Labor 




M 231 


Linear Algebra 


3 




Relations 


.. 3 


IE 224 


Advanced FORTRAN 




IE 234 


Production Control 


.. 3 




Programming 


3 


IE 502 


Operations Research 


3 


IE 243 


Work Analysis 


3 




Elective, Tech. 1 


3 


IE 346 


Statistical Analysis 


3 




'Elective, Math 


3 


IE 214 


Management Theory 


3 






— 











Total 


18 




Total 


15 
FOURTH 


YEAR 






IE 233 


Cost Control 


3 


IE 443 


Facilities Planning 


3 


EE201 


Circuits/Numer. Methods 


3 


IE 504 


Laboratory Thesis 


3 




Elective, General Stud. 


3 


EE 335 


Electrical Engineering 






Elective, Tech. II 


3 




Systems 


3 




Elective, Free 


3 




Elective, General Stud. 


3 






— 




Electives, Tech. Ill & IV 


6 



Total 



15 



Total 



18 



*IE 347 Probability Analysis or any 300 or 400 series math course. 

Selection of Electives 

Technical electives must be selected w/ith the consultation of the advisor and approval of the 
Department Chairman. Generally, technical electives must be junior or senior level courses in 
the areas of engineering, mathematics or physics. 
TOTAL — Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Engineering: 128-132 Semester Hours. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



laterials Engineering 



Fall 

M 118 Calculus II 

CH 105 General Chemistry I 
MT 219 Physical Metallurgy 
ME 101 Engineering Graphics 
E 202 World Literature II 

Total 



SECOND YEAR 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

4 
4 
3 
3 
3 





Sem. 


Spring 


Hrs. 


M 203 Calculus III 


4 


PH 205 Electro/Optics w/Lab. 


4 


MT 309-310 Materials Laboratory 


3 


EC 133 Principles of Economics 


3 


Elective, Chemistry 


(3) 4 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



17 



Total 



(17) 18 



THIRD YEAR 



M 204 Differential Equations 

MT 331 Non-Ferrous Metallurgy 
CE 201 Statics 
ME 301 Thermodynamics 
Elective, Physics 

Total 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



MT220 
MT 304 

CE 202 
EE201 
ME 204 



Electronic Materials 3 
Mechanical Behavior 

of Materials 3 

Mechanics of Materials I 3 
Circuits/Numerical Methods 3 

Dynamics 3 

Elective, General Studies 3 

Total 18 



91 



FOURTH YEAR 



MT 342 Steels & Their Heat- 

Treatment 
EE 336 Electrical Engineering 

Systems 
IE 204 Engineering Economics 

Elective, Materials 
Elective, Free 

Total 



MT 500 



3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



Research Project 3 

Elective, Materials 3 

Elective, Restricted 3 

Elective, Restricted 3 

Elective, General Studies 3 

Total 15 



Selection of Electlves 

Each student will meet with the Chairman of the Materials Engineering Department during the 
Spring term of his second year to select the restricted electives which will result in a program 
of maximum benefit to the student. 
TOTAL — Bachelor of Science degree in Materials Engineering: 123-130 Semester Hours. 




BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



lechanical Engineering 



92 








SECOND 


YEAR 






M 118 
PH 205 
E202 
CE201 
EE201 


Fall 

Calculus II 

Electro/Optics w/Lab. 
World Literature II 
Statics 
Circuits/Num. Methods 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

4 
4 
3 
3 
3 


M203 
ME 101 
ME 204 
CE202 
EE336 


Spring 

Calculus III 

Engineering Graphics 

Dynamics 

Mechanics of Materials 1 

Electrical Engrg. Systems 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

4 
3 
3 
3 
3 




Total 


17 
THIRD 


YEAR 


Total 


16 


ME 301 
ME 307 
M 204 
MT200 
ME 311 


Thermodynamics 1 
Mech. of Materials II 
Differential Equations 
Engineermg Materials 
Machme Elements 
Elective, Free 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


ME 302 
ME 315 
ME 321 
ME 344 


Thermodynamics II 
M. E. Lab. 1 
Fluid Mechanics 
Mechanics of Vibration 
Elective, Math 
Elective, Physics 


3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 




Total 


18 
FOURTH 


YEAR 


Total 


17 


ME 312 
ME 322 
EC 133 


Mechanical Design or 
Intro, to Gas Dynamics 
Princ. of Economics 1 
Elective, Gen. Studies 
Electives, Tech. 1 & II 


3 
3 
3 
6 


ME 404 
ME 406 
ME 415 
IE 204 


Heat & Mass Transfer 
Turbomachinery 
M. E. Lab. II 
Engineering Economics 
Elective, Gen. Studies 
Elective, Tech. Ill 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Total 



15 



Total 



18 



Selection of Electives 

Technical Electives must be selected with the consultation of the advisor and approval of the 
Department Chairman. Generally, technical electives will be chosen from the fallowing courses: 
ME 312, ME 322, ME 343, ME 401, ME 403, ME 408 and ME 512. 
TOTAL — Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering; 129-133 Semester Hours. 



Computer Technology 







FIRST 


YEAR 










Sem. 






Sem. 




Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 


M 115 


Math Analysis 1 


3 


M 117 


Calculus 1 


4 


E 113 


English Composition 


3 


E201 


World Lit. 1 


3 


HS 121 


History of Science 


3 


PH 150 


Mech,, Heat, Waves 




ES 107 


Intro, to Engineering 


3 




w/Ljb. 


4 


IE 105 


Intro, to Computers: 


COBOL 3 


IE 104 


Comn. Sys. Design 


3 


PE 111 


Physical Education 1 





IE 205 


Adv. COBOL Prog. 


3 






— 


PE 112 


Physical Education II 







Total 


15 










BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



Total 



17 



SECOND YEAR 



M 118 Calculus II 

IE 102 Intro, to Comp. FORTRAN 

PH 205 Electromagnetism & 

Optics w/Lab. 
E 202 World Literature II 

EC 133 Princ. of Economics I 

Total 



4 
3 

4 
3 
3 

17 



IE 214 
IE 224 
IE 346 
IE 204 
ME 101 



Management Theory 3 

Adv. FORTRAN Prog. 3 

Statistical Analysis 3 

Engineering Economics 3 

Engineering Graphics 3 

Total 15 



93 



THIRD YEAR 



IE 234 Production Control 

IE 332 PL/I and RPG 

IE 231 Terminal & Remote Job 

Entry Systems 
EC 350 Econ. of Labor Relations 
EE 355 Digital Systems I 

Total 



3 
3 

3 
3 
3 

15 



IE 334 
IE 336 
IE 502 
E220 
EE356 



Assembler Language 3 

Hardware Operation 3 

Operations Research 3 

Writing for Bus. & Ind. 3 

Digital Sys. II 3 

Total 15 



FOURTH YEAR 



IE 233 Cost Control 

IE 320 Operating Systems 

IE 325 APL/Basic 
Pill Psychology 

Gen. Studies Elective 

Total 



3 
3 
3 
3 
6 

18 



IE 335 
IE 420 
SO 113 



Simulations & Applications 3 

Comp. Facilities Design 3 

Sociology 3 

Gen. Studies Elective 6 



Total 



15 



'Students with sufficient preparation will be placed in Course M 117. and will take Course M 118 

in the Spring Semester. 

'In lieu of PE 111 and PE 112 students may elect to take course PE 100 for 3 Semester Hours 

credit. 

TOTAL — Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Technology: 121-124 Semester Hours. 



ENGINEERING 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



95 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS- UNDERGRADUATE SCHOOLS 



ACCOUNTING Jeffrey L. Williams, Chairman 



A2.ZZ 



A 111 



Introductory Accounting. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite to all other courses in accounting. 
A fundamental approach to the concepts, principles and procedures 
embodied in the financial accounting system. Emphasis is placed upon 
both the preparation of financial statements of merchandising business 
concerns via a procedural understanding of the financial accounting 
cycle and the interpretation of such statements. 



Alio Introductory Accounting II. 
/^ I I ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 111. 

A continuation of the fundamental approach and material covered in 
A 111 coupled with both the financial and managerial accounting func- 
tions for manufacturing business concerns. ' 



A1 1 ^ Municipal Accounting. 
' ' *+ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 111. 

An introduction to accounting principles, standards, and procedures 
applicable to state and local governments. The emphasis is on muni- 
cipal government. 



Intermediate Accounting II. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 221. 

Continuing the emphasis upon corporate financial reporting established 
in A 221, the principles and procedures associated with accounting 
valuations for current liabilities, long term liabilities, deferred credits 
and stockholders equity are developed and examined. Additional topics 
include mcome tax allocation, price level changes, accounting changes, 
statement of changes in financial position, pensions and leases, install- 
ment sales and consignments. Throughout, reference is made to the 
relevant publications of professional accountmg societies and account- 
ing associations. 

A ^O'Q ''"St Accounting I. 

'^ ^^O Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 112. 

An in depth examination of the financial accounting principles and 
procedures underlying the determination and reporting of product costs 
for manufacturing concerns. Emphasis is olaced upon the concepts and 
classifications of product costs (direct material, direct labor and 
manufacturing overhead) as well as the recording and accumulating of 
such costs within job order and process accounting systems. 

App^ Cost Accounting II. 
^^^' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 223. 

Continuing the underlying emphasis on product cost determination 
established in A 223, the tools and techniques of profit planning and 
cost analysis are introduced and integrated. Topics include budgets, 
standard costs, direct costing, cost-volume-protit analysis, differential 
and comparative cost analysis, by-product costs, transfer pricing, 
pricing methods and capital budgeting. 



Appi Intermediate Accounting I. 
^^ ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 112. 

A rigorous extension of the concepts, principles and procedures of 
corporate financial accounting, fundamentally introduced in A 111 and 
A 112. Given an emphasis upon reporting financial position and results 
of operations, the principles governing and the procedures implement- 
ing accounting valuations for current assets, investments and funds, 
fixed assets-tangible, fixed assets-intangible, other assets and deferred 
charges are developed and examined. Throughout, reference is made to 
the relevant publications of professional accounting societies and 
accounting associations. 



AOOI Advanced Accounting I. 
*^*^ ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 222. 

A concentrated examination of financial accounting concepts, principles 
and procedures applicable to partnership and consolidation accounting. 
Partnership topics include: formation and division of income, changes 
in ownership and liquidation. Consolidation topics include comprehen- 
sive coverage of the cost and equity methods as well as other issues 
(purchase versus pooling of interests, entity theory, etc.) related to 
consolidation accounting. Other financial accounting topics of a special- 
ized nature not previously covered can be included at the discretion 
of the instructor. 



96 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



A 332 



Advanced Accounting II. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; A 222. 

An intensive approacii to financial accounting theory by means of 
particular emphasis upon financial accounting principles as pronounced 
by the authoritative boards of professional accounting societies and as 
found in the literature generated by professional accounting associa- 
tions. Extensive use is made of the publications of professional account- 
ing societies and accounting associations. 

AOOO Auditing I. 
OOO Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 222. 

An analysis of the role and function of the independent auditor as a 
responsible professional and the means by which the scope of an 
audit engagement is determined. The topics analyzed will include audit- 
ing standards, professional ethics, internal control, evidence, statisti- 
cal sampling, and working papers. 

AOO^ Auditing II. 
'-J<J'-r Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite A 333. 

An examination and evaluation of the detailed procedures associated 
with auditing accounts related to a firm's financial position, changes in 
financial position and operating results. An evaluation of internal con- 
trol procedures will be an integral aspect of the evaluation of the 
fairness of account balances. 



A 335 



Income Tax Procedures I. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 112. 

An introduction to the Federal Income Tax laws. Course coverage will 
be devoted primarily to individual taxation including determination of 
gross income and adjusted gross income, capital gains and losses, de- 
ductions, exemptions, withholding, and tax return preparations. 



A 336 



Income Tax Procedures II. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; A 335, 

A continuation of A 335, to include topical coverage of installment 
sales, inventory, tax accounting, taxation of corporations including re- 
organizations and personal holding companies, taxation of estates and 
trusts, and tax procedures. A synopsis of Social Security and the Fed- 
eral Estate and Gift Taxes is also developed. 

A ■Q'3Q Managerial Accounting. 
/^ OOC7 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; A 224. 

The underlying principles, procedures and techniques of accounting 

analysis applicable to the managerial functions of planning, controlling 

and evaluating the economic performance of the profit oriented business 

unit. 



A O^l Financial Decision Making. 
'^ •-5'+ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; BA 113 

The principles and procedures associated with optimal decision making 
within the functional areas of finance. Emphasis is placed upon an 
understanding of the applications and limitations of decision models 
for the investment, financing, and dividend decisions of the profit 
oriented business unit. 



ART Elizabeth J. Moffitt, Chairman 



AT 1/^1 l/^O Introduction to Studio Art. 
/-\ I I \^ I - I VJ^ Credit, 6 semester hours. 

This course provides a foundation to further study in the visual arts 
and is designed to heighten the sensitivity and awareness of the 
individual. There will be an exploration of the expressive potential of 
a variety of materials. Problems in drawing, painting, and design. 
Contemporary art forms will be viewed in their historical relationship 
to those of the past. 

ATI Ozl *"^'"2 

r^ I I vy*^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Introduction and brief history of traditional non-loom weaving methods. 
Techniques to be covered will include tapestry, macrame, twining, 
netting and others. A variety of fibers will be explored. Techniques will 
be combined with weaving for the introduction of three-dimensional 
projects. 

AT 1 O*^ Basic Drawing. 

i-\ I I v-'^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A disciplined study in the fundamentals of free hand drawing including 
drawing objects from nature, study of perspective, exercises in co- 
ordination of hand and eye. Manipulation of line for articulation of form 
and space. Figure drawing. 

AT 1 OO Layout and Printing Techniques. 
'^ ' ' ^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Techniques of layout, lettering, and design in relation to printing 
methods. 

AT Pni Painting '• 

""^ ' fc-vy I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Problems in pictorial composition involving manipulation of form and 

color. Various techniques of applying pigment will be explored as well 

as mixing pigments, stretching and priming canvases, etc. 

AT POP Painting II. 

'^ ' ^■'^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A continuation of Art 201 Painting I with further exploration of two 
dimensional pictorial arrangements of form and color for greatest 
visual effectiveness. The student will be encouraged to develop his 
own personal idiom in the medium. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



97 



AT 203 



Commercial Art I. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Problems of graphic arts and advertising. Relations between the arts 
and methods of communication. An introduction to the fields of adver- 
tising, illustration, and editorial art; the role of the advertising agency; 
and the analysis of ideas for visual statement. 



AT 204 



Commercial Art II. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; AT 203. 

The organization and presentation of a project w/hich demonstrates the 
student's ability to apply theory on a professional level. Work for 
presentation in the form of a portfolio is developed through individual 
instruction and criticism. 

AT- OOR Ceramics I 

'^ ' ^Vy^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

An introduction to clay as a medium of expression. Lecture demonstra- 
tions cover basic hand building methods, various decorating techniques, 
use of tools, making and applying glazes, stacking and firing kilns. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00 

AT OOfi Ceramics II 

*^ ' ^yJ^-> Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Further study includes advanced hand building and glazing techniques 
with a special emphasis on the free exploration of form. Novel and 
experimental approaches to the medium are presented. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00 

y\T Oil 010 Design I and II. 

r\ ^ ^11-^1^ Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Exploration of basic visual elements; line, color, texture, shape, size, 
volume, space, and the psychic response they elicit. Organization of 
visual elements in effective design. Interaction of color. 

AT 0*31 History of Art to the Renaissance. 
'^ ' ^O I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

World art as an expressive and social phenomenon from its earliest 
beginnings, through religious and cultural cycles, to the visual develop- 
ments of the Renaissance. 

AT 0*^0 History of Modern Art. 
f^ ' ^»J^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Art from the Renaissance to the Twentieth Century in Europe and 
America; a continuation of Art 231. 



AT '^OO Figure Drawing. 

1^ ' OV^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: AT 201. 

Further study of graphic articulations using a variety of materials: 
pen, ink, charcoal, pencil, mixed media. Experimentation with tech- 
niques and refinement of means. Study of forms in nature. Life drawing. 

AT rirsA Sculpture I. 

i"^ ' ^J^^"-* Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The exploration of three dimensional materials for maximum effective- 
ness in expressive design. Experimentation with clay, plaster, wood, 
stone, canvas, wire screening, metal, found objects, etc. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

AT '^OP^ Sculpture II. 

f^ • OWO Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A continuation of AT 311, Sculpture I, with further exploration of 
three-dimensional materials and the possibilities they present for cre- 
ative visual statements. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

AT '31 P Lettering. 

r^ ' »J I ^. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: AT 211. 

Design and execution of basic hand lettering with pen and brush; 
utilization of hand lettering and type in the design of printed matter; 
use of letter forms as an element of visual design. 



AT 313-314 



Photography I and II. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

A course designed to explore the technical aspects of photography as 
a means for the development of the student's sensitivity to the image 
as an art form. Laboratory course. Technical demonstrations and ex- 
perimental laboratory techniques. Emphasis on black and white. Group 
criticisms. Field trips. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



AT 315 



Printmaklng. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The expressive potential of the graphic image through the techniques 
of silkscreen, wood cut, wood engraving, linoleum blockprint, collotype, 
nonotype, and photo-silkscreening. Problems in black and white and 
color. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



AT 0*3*3 History of Interior Design. 
f^ ' ^OO Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A survey of developments in the decorative arts from Antiquity to the 
present day. Special consideration of the esthetic and practical rela- 
tionships of architectural space to interior decor. 



AT *3 1 7 Interior Design. 

r\ i O I / Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A basic studio course with exploration of Interior Design problems 
and their relationship to Architecture. Special emphasis on exploitation 
of space, form, color and textures for greatest effectiveness. 



98 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



AT 322 



Illustration. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A solid foundation in the teciiniques of creative illustration. Various 
media and their expressive possibilities will be studied; charcoal, 
pencil, pen and ink, wash, colored pencils, acrylic, etc. 



A-p 00 1 Contemporary Art. 
A\ I >D>D I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Art as an expressive and social phenomenon from 1945 through the 
developmental happenings of the present. 

/y-i- QOO Survey of Afro-American Art. 
f^ I *jOO Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Black art m the United States from the Colonial period to the present. 
Consideration of African cultural influences. Analysis of modern 
trends in Black Art. 



AT 401 



studio Seminar I. 

Credit, 1-4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: AT 101-102, AT 201, AT 302 or AT 313, and Art electives. 
Drawing on his development through his previous study the student 
will concentrate on major projects in areas of his choice. 



LA 102 

Prerequisite: LA 101. 
Agency, partnerships, 

LA 221 



Business Lav« II. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

corporations, and legal aspects of marketing. 



Law of Sales. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: LA 102. 

This course is an advanced study of Business Law comprising: bail- 
ments; duties and liabilities of bailees, common carriers, and ware- 
housemen; the laws governing the rights of parties engaged in the 
transfer of personal property. Questions of title, risks assumed, 
rights of creditors, express and implied warranties, buyers and sellers 
remedies, together with the business background out of which such 
relations arise, are all considered. 

Law of Commercial Paper and Bankruptcy. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: LA 221. 

This course is a study of the Negotiable Instruments Law, dealing with 
negotiable promissory notes, bills of exchange, and bank credits with 
an analysis of their form and function in commercial transactions. A 
brief survey of bankruptcy procedure under the federal bankruptcy 
laws IS included. 



LA 222 



AT 402 



studio Seminar II. 

Credit, 1-4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: AT 401. 
Continuation of Studio Seminar 1. 



AT 599 



Independent Study. 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with 

a maximum of 12 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of department. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be initiated 
by the student. 



BUSINESS LAW Jeffrey L. Williams, Coordinator 



LA 101 



Business Law I. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Contract law as a foundation for anticipating legal difficulties and 
making the best use of legal advice. Functional and policy problems 
in the legal resolution of a controversy. The origin and development 
of common, statutory, and constitutional law and of the functioning 
of the judicial system. 



CHEMISTRY William H. Nyce, Chairman 

^1-11 r^*^ introduction to General Chemistry w/Lab. 
^^rl I \Jk^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Introductory course in inorganic chemistry dealing with elements, 
compounds, reactions, atomic structure, chemical bonding solutions, 
and nuclear reactions. Laboratory work involves weighing and experi- 
ments related to the material covered in lectures. 

Laboratory Fee:. $18.00. 

^I_I 1 /^^ Elementary Organic Chemistry. 
^-*'^ I y-f-r Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 103 or permission of the department. 
A one-semester introduction to one of the major fields of chemistry 
designed for students not majoring in chemistry. Nomenclature, struc- 
ture, and the principal reactions of aliphatic and aromatic organic 
chemistry will be studied. 

^W 1 r\^ General Chemistry I w/Lab. 
^^*^ • '^■^ Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Pr;requisite: CH 103 or one high school unit of chemistry, or written 
qualifying examination. 

Application of nuclear reactions, thermochemistry, electrochemistry, 
the production and properties of metals, the properties of the halogen 
and sulfur groups, and organic chemistry. Laboratory work related to 
the material covered. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00, 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



99 



r^M 1 Ofi General Chemistry II w/ Lab. 
^->»' ' '-'v Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 105. 

Chemical equilibria, chemical bondmg, solutions, the chemistry of 
nitrogen, carbon, silicon, and boron; the use of spectroscopy to deter- 
mine structure of compounds. Laboratory work includes experiments 
in qualitative analysis. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

^l-l 1 Oft Elementary Organic Chemistry Laboratory. 
^■^i* I v-'CJ Credit, 1 semester hour. 

Prerequisite: CH 103. 

A laboratory course designed to accompany CH 104. The principal 

operations of organic synthesis such as refluxing, distillation, filtration, 

and crystallization are studied and applied in a number of simple 

preparations. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

^1— I 1 1 O Environmental Chemistry. 
\-*n t l\J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CH 105 or consent of instructor. 
Chemical method of solving pollution problems in three major areas: 
the air environment, the water environment, and in the treatment of 
solid wastes. In each area process flow sheets, chemical reactions, 
and process equipment necessary for the reduction of pollutants will 
be studied. Recommendations in these areas will also be reviewed. 



r^H 1 1 R History of Chemistry. 
v>n I I *J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 103 or permission of instructor. 
The history of chemistry beginning with ancient civilizations through the 
middle ages and the alchemist's search for gold. The discovery of the 
various elements and the periodic table. The lives of chemistry's great 
men and women, chemistry's contribution to the atomic age. 

^H 1 PO Chemistry of Addicting and Hallucinogenic Drugs. 
^^•^ ' ^'^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 103 or permission of instructor. 
The properties, dosages, preparations, and reactions of the addicting, 
and hallucinogenic drugs. Alcohol, caffeine, nicotine, sedatives, stimu- 
lants, tranquilizers, LSD, mescaline, cannabis, narcotics, and anti- 
depressants. 

^I_I Oil Quantitative Analysis w/ Lab. 
^^*' ^^ ' * Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 106. 

Theory and laboratory training in the preparation of solutions, volu- 
metric and gravimetric analysis, and the use of special laboratory 
instruments. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



CH301-302 



Organic Chemistry w/Lab. 
Credit, 8 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 106. 

The common reactions of aliphatic and aromatic chemistry, emphasis 
on reaction mechanisms. Laboratory assignments on the technique 
needed in organic synthesis. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00 per semester. 



CH 321-322 



Plastics and Polymer Chemistry. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CH 106, CH 302. 

All phases of the plastics and polymers field, including the chemistry 

mvolved, methods, properties of the plastics, and uses of the various 

materials. 

^ |_i O^ 1 Instrumental Methods of Analysis w/Lab. 
^^rl 0*+ I Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CH 106, CH 211, CH 301. 

The theory of various instrumental methods, including visible ultraviolet 
and infrared spectroscopy, gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, 
and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Laboratory identifica- 
tion of compounds by the methods discussed in the lectures. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

^|_| OKI Qualitative Organic Chemistry w/Lab. 
^^n O^J I Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 302. 

A one-semester laboratory course dealing with the systematic identi- 
fication of organic compounds. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

/"•|_J /l/^l yl<^0 Advanced Organic Chemistry. 
^.^n '^yj I -'-tKJ^ Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 302. 

The mechanism of organic reactions, advanced problems in synthetic 

organic chemistry, and special topics such as stereochemistry and 

photochemistry. 

^Ll/lO'i /100 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry w/Lab. 
^-♦n **^ • -*+^^ Credit, 8 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 431. Corequisite: CH 432. 

Modern structural concepts, reaction mechanisms, the application of 

principles of physical chemistry and bonding theory in inorganic 

chemistry. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00 per semester. 

^Ul /I'^l /IQO Physical Chemistry w/Lab. 
^^rl *+0 I -'+0^ Credit, 8 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CH 106, PH 202, and M 203. 

Fundamental laws of gases, thermodynamics, the theory of atomic and 
molecular structure, kinetics, and phase equilibria. Laboratory work 
enables the student to evaluate this subject by studying physical and 
chemical data. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00 per semester. 



100 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



CH433 



CH 451-452 



Advanced Physical Chemistry. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH432. 

Emphasis on the fundamentals of quantum mechanics, statistical 
mechanics, molecular bonding theory, and spectroscopy. Offered only 
in the evening. 

/^l_| A/\\ Analytical Chemistry w/Lab. 
^^■' *+** ' Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 431. Corequlsite: CH 432. 

Application of instrumental methods to inorganic and organic methods 
of analysis, including mass, ultraviolet and infrared spectrophotometry, 
chromatography, and electroanalytical analysis. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

Thesis for Undergraduate Chemistry 

Majors w/Lab. 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CH 302, CH 432. 

An original investigation in the laboratory under the guidance of a 
member of the department. Oral discussion of the completed work 
before the staff at the end of the second semester. Final thesis report. 
Departmental approval required. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00 per semester. 

^l_i /Ifll Chemical Spectroscopy: Technique. 
V>^n '-frO I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 432. 

Introduction to the elementary theory with emphasis on techniques 
and interpretation of data obtained in applications of infrared, Raman, 
visible ultraviolet, nuclear quadrupole, electron spin, and nuclear 
magnetic resonance spectroscopy to the solution of chemical problems. 
Offered only in the evening. 

Seminar I and II. 
Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CH 302, CH 432. 

Reports and discussions in various fields of chemistry reviewed by 

students and staff. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING John C. Martin. Chairman 



CH511-512 



CH599 



independent Study. 

Credit, 1-3 credit hours per semester with 

a maximum of 12. 

Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of department. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be initiated 
by the student. 

Plant Visitations. 
Credit, none. 

Open to junior and senior chemistry majors. Visits to plants in the area 
to investigate plant and laboratory facilities in the chemical industry. 

Biochemistry w/Lab. 
Credit, 8 semester hours. 

See description under Science and Biology. 



SC 361-362 



CE201 



statics. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: PH 150 and M 118 (Note: M 118 may be taken concur- 
rently.) 

Composition and resolution of forces in two and three dimensions. 
Equilibrium of forces in stationary systems. Analysis of trusses. 
Centroids and second moments of areas, distributed forces, friction, 
shear and bending moment diagrams. 



CE202 



Mechanics of Materials I. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CE201. 

Elastic behavior of structural elements under axial, flexural, and tor- 
sional loading. Stress in and deformation of members, including beams. 
Lectures supplemented with laboratory exercises. 



^C" OO*^ Surveying I. 

^-'^" ^iV/O Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Theory and practice of engineering measurements using tape, level, 
and transit. Practice in topographic mapping, making of profiles, and 
computations to determine areas of land volumes of earthwork. 



/"»p" O/^K Statics and Strength of Materials 
^-'^ ^'--'^ Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: PH 150 and M 118 (M 118 may be taken concurrently.) 
This course is a study of force systems in equilibrium. Also, basic 
machine and structural elements under tensile compressive, bending 
and torsional loads are analyzed for strength (stress) and for defor- 
mation (strain). Laboratory work is included. This course is an alternate 
to CE 201 and CE 202 in those engineering programs requiring CE 205. 



CE301 



Transportation Engineering. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Development, organization, administration, and interrelation of trans- 
portation systems and facilities, including highways, railroads, airport, 
rapid transit systems, waterways, and pipe lines. Emphasis placed on 
economics of location of resources, industry, and population. 



^p- Of^O Building Construction. 
^^^ O*-/^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Initiation into the planning and anatomy of buildings, materials avail- 
able and their uses, some principles of construction procedures, 
general estimating of costs, and relative merits of various types of 
construction. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



101 



CE303 



CE305 



steel Design and Construction. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequsite: CE 202. 

Analysis, design, and construction of steel structures. Design of 
frames, members, connections, and other related topics. Tension mem- 
bers, compression members, beams, girders, trusses, and rigid frames. 
Fabrication and erection, including shop practice. 

^C *^C^A. Soil Mechanics. 

^-'^ OW*+ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites; M 203 and CE 202. 

Structural composition of the earth's crust and the mechanics of its 
formation. Soil classifications and physical properties are related to 
the principles underlying the behavior of soils subjected to various 
loading conditions. Subsurface exploration and laboratory exercises. 

Highway Engineering. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CE 301. 

Study of traffic, methods of making traffic surveys, safety and accident 
records, and methods of traffic control. Emphasis on planning of major 
highways, intersections, and urban streets. Study of pavements, drain- 
age, and general administration and operation. 

^C" OO^ Hydraulics. 

<^^- *J\J\J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; ME 204. 

The mechanics of fluids and fluid flow. Laminar and turbulent flow. Flow 
in pipes and open channels. Orifices and weirs. Fluid pressures. Wave 
action and erosion. Lectures supplemented with laboratory demonstra- 
tions. 

r^ir '^HR Surveying II. 

^-''^ *J^-'C3 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; CE203. 

A continuation of Surveying I covering principles of field astronomy, 
hydrographic surveying, and mine and tunnel surveying. An introduc- 
tion to the general principles and use of photogrammetric surveying. 
A study of the boundary and legal aspects of Land Surveying including 
deed research and its application to boundary determination. 

^C" OOQ Structural Design — Timber 
<^^- 0\^C7 Credit, 11/2 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; CE 202. 

Study of the structure of wood and its growth, preservation and fire 
protection. The analysis and design of structural members of timber 
including columns, beams, tension members, trusses and connections. 
Study of laminated and plywood members. 

^p- O 1 pk Structural Design — Masonry 
^-'^ *-* ' ^ Credit, IV2 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; CE 202. 

The structural design and analysis of bricl( and concrete masonry 

structures including unreinforced and reinforced load bearing walls. 



^C" 01 1 Structural Design — Timber and Masonry 
^-'^ *^ ' ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite; CE 202. 
This IS a combination of CE 309 and CE 310. 



CE312 



structural Analysis I. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite; CE 202. 

This course presents basic structural engineering topics on the 
analysis and design of structures. Topics studied are load criteria and 
influence lines; force and deflection analysis of beams and trusses; 
analysis of indeterminate structures by approximate methods, super- 
position and moment distribution. Familiarization with framing systems 
will be gamed by studying existing structures. 



^p- O 1 /I Concrete Design and Construction. 
^-'^ ^ • ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; CE 312 or permission of instructor. 
Basic principles of reinforced concrete, utilizing both Strength and 
Alternate Design Methods. Design of beams, columns, slabs, footings, 
and retaining walls. Construction methods, including forming, rein- 
forcing, concrete placing, prestressing, and precasting will be described. 



^C *3 1 C^ Environmental Engineering and Sanitation. 
^-*C. O I »J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Introduction into hydrology; population and water demand projections; 
water and wastewater transport systems. Problems concerning public 
health, water and wastewater treatment, solid waste disposal, air 
pollution, and private water supply and sanitary disposal systems. 



CE 316 



Code Indoctrination. 
Credit. 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; None. 

Study of codes and regulations prepared and enacted for the public 
and employee safety along with codes and regulations implemented to 
develop a uniform and balanced land development and usage program. 
A review of the legal control and administration of such codes as the 
Uniform Building Code, Life Safety Code. Health Codes, Occupational 
Safety and Health Code, Labor Laws, Zoning Regulations, Planning Reg- 
ulations, Wetlands Regulations will be covered during the study of 
codes. 



/"•pr ^01 Foundation Design and Construction. 
^^^- *-r\J I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; CE 304 and CE 314. 

Design of isolated and combined footings, mats, retaining walls, piers, 
abutments, pile foundations, and similar structural elements used to 
safely support buildings, bridges, and other structures. 



102 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



/"•p" AC^^ Water Supply and Power. 
^■^t— *-r\J^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; CE 306. 

Study of principles of water resources engineering including surface 
and ground water hydrology. Design of water supply, flood control, and 
hydroelectric reservoirs. Hydraulics and design of water supply distri- 
bution and drainage collection systems including pump and turbine de- 
sign. Principles of probability concepts in the design of hydraulic 
structures. Study of water and pollution control laws. 



^P" KQQ Independent Study. 
^^'— ^^^ Credit, 1-3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of department. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of faculty member to 
explore an area of interest to him. This course must be initiated by 
the student. He must have the consent of the faculty director and the 
faculty director's chairman. 



C^tr ACl^ City Planning. 

^-''— "-r^J^J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Engineering, social economics, political, and legal aspects of city 
planning. Emphasis placed on case studies of communities in Connecti- 
cut. Zoning. Principles and policies of redevelopment. 



(^CT AC^A Sanitary Engineering 
^-^^ *+W+ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CE 402 or permission of instructor. 
Study of physical, chemical, biological and bacteriological aspects of 
water quality and pollution control. Study of unit processes and op- 
erations of water and wastewater treatment including industrial waste 
and sludge processing. Design of water treatment and sewage treat- 
ment systems including sludge treatment and incineration. General 
construction and operation of treatment plants. 



COMMUNICATIONS Gilbeti Whiteman, Chairman 



CE405 



indeterminate Structures. 
Credit. 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: ME 307 or CE 312. 

Analysis and design of continuous beams, rigid frames, arches, and 

multi-story structures of concrete and steel. Elastic and plastic design 

principles. 



^p AC\~7 Contracts and Specifications. 
^^^- *+'-'• Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CE 302 or permission of instructor. 
Principles of contract formation, execution, and termination. Study 
of specifications and practice in their preparation. Other legal matters 
of importance to engineers. 



CO 101 



Fundamentals of Communications. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

An introduction to the various media of public information, including 
newspapers, magazines, radio, television, trade publications, public 
relations, and the film. 



f^O 1 O^ Problems of Public Communications. 
^^'^ ' '^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CO 101 or equivalent. 

An examination of such problems as influence of the media, aspects 
of social interactions involving communications, value/beliefs, myths. 
Students will examine the kinds of writing involved with the media 
and begin to do some writing on their own. 



^/^ OO^ Sound Workshop. 
^<^^<J C-<J^--> Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Lectures, demonstration and lab practice. Concerned with sound as 
used in radio, television, and film. 

Laboratory Fee: $10.00 



C^ C\ OOQ ^iiM Broadcasting. 
^^■^^^ ^WO Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CO 206. 

Advanced radio production. The student writes scripts and coordinates 
with production for dramatic and non-dramatic presentation. Informal 
audience participation programming is included. 



CV^ ^Ol Design Project. 

^^'— "^^^ ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CE 407 or permission of instructor. 
Planning and design of an engineering project, starting with map and 
general requirements as provided by an owner. Preparation of design 
drawings for the layout and structures. Estimate of cost. Planning 
construction procedures and schedule. 



^r\ O 1 O '^'''" Production, Theory and Practice. 
^^^^ ^ ' v/ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Stresses the understanding of communication through film. Although 
whole class sessions will be held, some with illustrated lectures, small 
group sessions will be held on the basic techniques of film making. 

Laboratory Fee: $10.00 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



103 



CO 220 



Film Production I 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CO 210 or permission of instructor. 
Transformation of an idea into film: Initial analysis, film script, pre- 
production planning, nature of tfie production process. Production of 
a short film by team. Emphasis is on industrial film making. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 



CO 230 



Film Production II 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CO 210 or permission of instructor. 
Creative process involved in translating advertising copy to film based 
upon advertising objectives and consumer motivation and appeals. 
Production of "Spots" by teams. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE L. Craig Parker, Jr., Director 
Robert Murillo, Undergraduate Academic Coordinator 



cj 101 



Introduction To Criminal Justice. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A survey of the structures and processes in the administration of 
justice: analysis of the criminal justice sequence including the 
foundations of criminal law, the elements and procedures of conviction, 
and the various dispositions available for convicted offenders. 



CJ 102 



Criminal Law. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The scope, purpose, definition, and classification of Criminal Law. 
Offenses against the person, habitation and occupancy, property and 
other offenses. Responsibility in general, and limitations on criminal 
capacity and its modifying circumstances. Special Defenses. The Con- 
necticut Penal Code will also be discussed. 



CJ 104 



Introduction to Police and Law Enforcement. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A general survey course intended to acquaint the student with major 
developments and problems in policing. The course will stress the role 
of police in a pluralistic society from the mid nineteenth century to 
the present. Topics covered will include: police discretion, organization 
and management as a socio-politico phenomena, police unions, corrup- 
tion and ethics, and the police subculture as a distinct value system. 



CJ 107 



Introduction to Corrections. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

An introduction and overview of the correctional process, with spe- 
cial attention being given to structures, practices and problems of in- 
stitutional confinement. 



CJ 201 



Principles of Criminal Investigation. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

An introduction to criminal investigation in the field. Conduct at the 
crime scene, interview and interrogation of witnesses and suspects, 
the use of informants, and the techniques of surveillance. The special 
techniques employed in particular kinds of investigation as well as 
presentation of the police case in court. 



C* I O/^K Interpersonal Relations. 
^-'^J ^WiJ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Junior status required. 

Critical factors in relating effectively with others. Crises intervention 
and techniques employed in relating to deeply distressed individuals. 
Emphasis on supervisor-supervisee relations, police officer-citizen, 
counselor-client, etc. Techniques such as Gestlat, role playing, encoun- 
ter, and Satir approach are stressed. 



/^ I opjQ Correctional Treatment Programs. 
^^^ ^V-'C? Ciedit, 3 semester hours. 

Various treatment modalities employed in the rehabilitation of 
offenders. Field visits to various correctional treatment facilities such 
as half-way houses and community based treatment programs. 



CJ215 



Introduction to Forensic Science. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CJ 201. 

A classroom lecture-discussion session and a practical laboratory 
period. Forensic Science (Criminalistics): the observation, collection, 
positive identification, and preservation of physical, chemical, and 
biological evidence for court presentation. The connection between 
the evidence found at the crime scene and the identification, appre- 
hension, and conviction of the criminal. Fingerprints, identification of 
hairs and fibers, chemicals, narcotics, blood, semen, glass, soil, and 
wood. Imprint and impression taking, bullet comparison, document 
examination, and various photographic methods. 



CJ217 



Criminal Procedure I. 

(Formerly American Legal Systems I) 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

An inquiry into the nature and scope of the Fourteenth Amendment due 
process clause; the rules of law as well as doctrinal assumptions un- 
derlying the law of arrest, search and seizure; and legal control of 
police interrogations and confessions. 



104 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



CJ 218 



Criminal Procedure II & Evidence. 

(Formerly American Legal Systems II) 

Credit. 3 semester hours. 
Legal doctrines employed In controlling the successive stages of the 
criminal process: rules of law related to wiretapping and lineups, pre- 
trial decision making, juvenile justice and trial. 



(~* I OOP) Legal Issues in Corrections. 

^^*J ^^-<J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

An examination of the legal foundation of correctional practice and a 

review of recent judicial decisions which are altering the correctional 

environment. An analysis of the factors and forces which are creating 

a climate of significant reform in corrections. 



C^ I 00 1 Juvenile Delinquency. 

^^"■^ ^^- ' Credit, 3 semester hours, (see SO 231) 

Prerequisites: P HI and SO 113. 

An analysis of delinquent behavior in American society: examination 

of the theories and social correlates of delinquency, and the socio- 

legal processes and apparatus for dealing with juvenile delinquency. 



^ I ^r\C\ History of Criminal Justice. 
\^>J ■JKjyj Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The History of Criminal Justice: An introduction to the historical 
evolution of the present-day criminal justice system in the United 
States. The development of police, courts and corrections in the 
United Kingdom and other English-speal<ing nations will be traced and 
compared with the American experience. 



/^ I O/^O OOyl Forensic Science laboratory I & II. 
^^ J O^^O-OV-"-!- Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Greater attention given to specific topics and to laboratory testing 
and identifications than in CJ 215. In the classroom the laboratory or 
practical procedures are outlined and discussed. The laboratory work 
involves testing and identification of evidence, and more detailed 
procedures are undertaken than in CJ 215. An example would be the 
casting of hairs and fibers for microscopic identification of material as 
containing a narcotic or blood. 

Laboratory Fee: $15.00 per semester. 



CJ 309 



Probation and Parole. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Junior status required. 

An in-depth analysis of probation, parole and varied alternatives to 
imprisonment: examination of findings of evaluative research of pro- 
bation and parole and results with current and experimental non-in- 
stitutional correctional programs. 



C^ I O 1 1 Criminology. 

\^^ O I I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

An introduction to the principles and concepts of Criminology: analysis 
of the social context of criminal behavior, including a review of 
criminological theory, the nature and distribution of crime, the soci- 
ology of criminal law, and the societal reactions to crime and criminals. 



CJ 400 



Criminal Justice Problems Seminar. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Junior status required. 

An examination of theoretical and philosophical issues impinging upon 
the administration of justice: the problems of reconciling legal and 
theoretical ideals in various sectors of the criminal justice system 
with the realities of practice. 



^ I O/^ 1 Group Dynamics In Criminal Justice. 
\^U -JKJ I Credit: 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: P 111 Psychology. 

Focus on issues related to the development and interaction' of indi- 
viduals in groups. Social psychological theory and research as it 
relates to Criminal Justice. 



^ I AO'O Police-Community Relations. 
^^^ '^■v-'^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113. 

Designed to put the police and community into a broad theoretical 
context. Sociological and environmental implications examined. Atten- 
tion given to police practices which have caused much public hostility 
and which have isolated law enforcement from the rest of society. 



(~' I *aO^ Behaviorism: Applications In Criminal Justice. 
\^U -JKJ^. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: P 111 Psychology, 

Discussion of basic assumption of learning theory that apply to treat- 
ment and educational contexts. Token economies and other behavior 
modification situations will be explored. Notions of reinforcement, 
punishment and extinction are stressed. 



CJ 405 



Seminar In Criminal Justice. 
Credit: 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Senior status required. 

An intensive analysis of variable topics of critical relevance in the 
administration of justice: a seminar exposing the student to a con- 
centrated learning experience conducive to acquiring special expertise 
in a specific academic area. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



105 



f-' I Ar\f^ Correctional Counseling. 
^-^-J *+WO Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Junior status required. 

Fundamental psychological counseling theory as it applies to treat- 
ment of offenders. 

C^ I ^QQ Research Project. 
^^*^ *-fC70 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Senior status required. 

The student carries out an original research project in a criminal 

justice setting and reports his study. 



CJ499 



Independent Study. 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with a 

maximum of 12. 

Prerequisite: Instructor's consent. 

Opportunity for the student, under the direction of a faculty member, 
to explore an area of interest to him. (Student should obtain prior ap- 
proval from department and supervisor first.) 

f~* I C/^ 1 Criminal Justice Internship. 
K-*>J iJKJ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of the department chair- 
man. 

This program provides monitored field experience with selected federal, 
state, or local criminal justice agencies or forensic science labora- 
tories subject to academic guidance and review. MG 449 Independent 
Study may be substituted with approval of the chairman. 



ECONOMICS Franklin B. Sherwood, Chairman 



C"^ '^OO Economic History of the U.S. 
t^\^ >J\J\J Qredjt, 3 semester hours. 

Development of American economic life in the various stages of agri- 
culture, trade, industry, finance, and labor. Change of economic prac- 
tices and institutions, particularly in business, banking, and labor. 
The changing role of government. 

P"/^ *^ 1 O Principles of Economic Geography. 
^■^-' *^ ■ ^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Distribution of resources, industries, and population in relation to 
physical, economic, and technological factors. Principles of economic 
location and regional development. 

P"/^ *^ 1 1 Government Regulation of Business. 
'— ^^ *-> I I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EC 133-134. 

An appraisal of public policy toward transportation, trusts, monopolies, 

public utilities, and other forms of government regulation of economic 

activity. 



EC314 



Public Finance. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EC 133-134. 

Theory and practice of public taxation. The budgetary process at all 

levels of government. 



EC320 



Mathematical Methods in Economics. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 115 ■ M 116; or M 127, M 115: or QA 118 - QA 128. 
Applications of various mathematical concepts and techniques in 
macroeconomic and microeconomic analysis. Special emphasis on the 
design and interpretation of mathematical models of economic 
phenomena. 



P"^ 1 '^'^ Principles of Economics I. 
^^-^ • w*-* Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Foundations of economic analysis, including economic progress; re- 
sources, technology, private enterprise, profits, and the price system. 
Macroeconomics including national income, employment, and economic 
growth. Price levels, money and banking, the Federal Reserve System, 
theory of income, employment and prices, business cycles, and 
problems of monetary, fiscal, and stabilization policy. 



CT^ *^*^f> Money and Banking. 
CL^^ OOV::) Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EC 133-134. 

Nature and functions of money, commercial banking system. Federal 
Reserve System and the Treasury, monetary theory, financial institu- 
tions, international financial relationships, history of money and 
monetary policy in the United States, and current problems of 
monetary policy. 



V-C^ 1 *^/L Principles of Economics II. 
^^^ ' *J*+ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EC 133. 

Microeconomics including markets and market structure and the allo- 
cation of resources. The distribution of income, the public economy, 
the international economy, and current economic problems. 



P"^ *^ylO Microeconomic Analysis. 
^^-^ 0*+W Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EC 133-134. 

Study of the determination of the prices of goods and production 
factors in a free market economy and the role of prices in the allo- 
cation of resources. 



106 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



EC 342 



International Economics. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EC 133-134. 

The role, importance, and currents of international commerce; the 
balance of international payments; foreign exchange and international 
finance: international trade theory; problems of balance of payments 
adjustment; trade restrictions; international control of raw materials; 
economic development and foreign aid. 



P"/^ ^/{^ Macroeconomic Analysis. 
^^-^ •+^**J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EC 133-134, and A 111. 

An investigation of the makeup of the national income and an analysis 
of the factors that enter into its determination; an examination of the 
roles of consumption, investment, government finance, and money 
influencing national income and output, employment, the price level, 
and rate of growth; policies for economic stability and growth. 



p-^ '^/IC^ Comparative Economic Systems. 
^^^ 0*+vJ Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EC 133-134. 

A comparative study of the economic organization, resource alloca- 
tion, and growth problems of the United States, British, and French 
economic systems and the economic systems of the U.S.S.R., Poland, 
and Yugoslavia. 



EC450 



EC 350 



Economics of Labor Relations. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EC 133-134. 

History of the union movement in the United States, union structure 
and government, problems of collective bargaining, economics of the 
labor market, wage theories, unemployment, governmental policy and 
control, and problems of security. 



EC410 



Econometrics. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EC 320. 

The application of mathematical and statistical methods to both 

micro- and macro-economic policy issues. 



P"^^ AA(^ Economic Development. 
^^-* '+'+v-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EC 133-134. 

Economic problems of underdeveloped countries and 

necessary to induce growth. Individual projects required. 



the policies 



Thesis. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A written report on a research project. No class meetings, but periodic 
conferences with the thesis supervisor. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Gerald J. Kirwin, Chairman 



P"p- 0/^1 Basic Circuits/Numerical Methods. 
^-^~ ^v-' I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 102, M 117, PH 150 

Ideal circuit models, resistance, capacitance, inductance, active de- 
vices, voltage and current sources. Kirchoff laws, loop and node vari- 
ables, matrix formulations, network theorems. Resistive networks and 
first order differential systems, analytical and numerical solutions. 
Digital computer techniques. 



p-p" p/^p Network Analysis I. 
^-^- ^^<J^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 201. 

Second order differential systems, natural and forced response. Natural 
frequencies, poles and zeros, network functions. Sinusoidal steady state 
analysis of single and three phase systems. Two port parameters. Di- 
gital computer algorithms in analysis and design of networks. 



p^ AA^ Economic Thought. 
'—^^ *+*+^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EC 133-134. 

The development of economic doctrine from mercantilism and Adam 
Smith to the thinking of modern day theorists. Emphasis upon the 
main currents of thought with the applicability to present-day prob- 
lems. Individual study and reporting. 



PP" OKO Electrical Engineering Lab I. 
^-^- ^*J»-> Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 201. 

Laboratory exercises and projects. Resistive, capacitive and inductive 
elements, and diodes. Measurement of electrical parameters. Charac- 
teristics and applications of basic electrical laboratory apparatus. 
Note: Part-time students are charged for a standard 3-semester-houi 
course. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



107 



p-p" *3/^1 Network Analysis II. 

^^ OV-* I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EE 202, M 203. 

Properties of transfer functions. Impulse responses and convolution. 

Graphical techniques, amplitude and phase plots. Fourier series, signal 

resolution, Fourier and Laplace transformations. Harmonic phenomena 

in polyphase systems. 



p-p7 *^ACt Electrical Engineering Lab II. 
^^ 0*+27 Credit. 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 347. 

Laboratory exercises and projects. Measurement of diode and transistor 

parameters. Amplifying and shaping circuits, oscillators. Design of logic 

elements. Digital circuits. Study of a-c and d-c rotating machines. 

Note: Part-time students are charged for a standard 3-semester-hour 

course. 



p-p- OpjO Systems Analysis. 
CC ^^^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EE 301, M 204. 

Ideal filter properties, bandwidth and time response. Linear system 
theory. State variables, transition matrix. Analytical and numerical solu- 
tion techniques. Feedback systems, stability, observability, controll- 
ability. 



PP" OCO Physical Electronics. 
^^ •-'^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: PH 205, M 204. 

Basic principles of operation of semiconductor devices including diodes, 
transistors, LED's, photodiodes, FET's, UJT's, tunnel diodes and lasers. 
Physical processes in semiconductors — drift diffusion, carrier genera- 
tion, conduction, light emission and absorption. 



p-p* OOf; Electrical Engineering Systems. 
CC >J<J\J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 201. 

Single phase and three phase power systems properties. Characteristics 
of rotating machines and transformers. Diodes, transistors and other 
solid state devices amplifying and wave shaping circuits. Electrical 
instrumentation techniques. This course is intended for non-majors. 



p-p- oqrc OC^; Digital Systems I and II. 
C.C >Z>iJiJ->DiJ\J Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Fundamental concepts of digital systems. Boolean algebra and its ap- 
plication to logic design. Map and tabular techniques of minimization. 
Synchronous and asynchronous sequential systems analysis and design. 
Applications to logic design problems of digital computers. 



P"p- O^ 1 Digital Computer Techniques. 
•^^ 0*+ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 203, EE 202. 

Numerical analysis techniques with applications to engineering prob- 
lems. Design and execution of digital computer alogrithms. Digital 
simulations of dynamic systems. 



PP" Of;i Electromagnetic Theory. 
^-^- '^'O I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 203, PH 205. 

Basic electromagnetic theory including static fields of electric charges 
and the magnetic fields of steady electric currents. Fundamental field 
laws. Maxwell's equations, scalar and vector potentials, Laplace's equa- 
tion and boundary conditions. Magnetization, polarization, time varying 
electric and magnetic fields, field plotting. 



EE344 



Electrical Machines. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: EE 202. 

Fields, forces, torques in magnetic systems. Theory, characteristics and 
applications of direct current and alternating current machines, includ- 
ing transformers and synchronous and induction machinery. 



p-p" OCO Electromechanical Energy Conversion. 
CC ^\J<J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EE 361 and M 204. 

Introduction to electromechanical devices, lumped parameter electro- 
mechanics; introduction to rotating machinery, equilibrium and stability, 
fields in moving matter; energy conversion dynamics. 



EE 347-348 



Electronics I and II. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 202. 

Principles and applications of electronic devices including diodes, rec- 
tifiers, transistors, FET's and integrated circuits. Device models, para- 
sitic effects. Single and multistage power and voltage amplifiers, fre- 
quency responses. Feedback and stability effects. Design considerations. 



P"Cr ^OO statistical Systems Analysis. 
'— ^^ *+^i'-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 301. 

The elements of probability theory. Continuous random variables. Char- 
acteristic functions and central limit theorem. Stationary random 
processes and auto correlation. Power density spectrum of a random 
process. 



108 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



P*C' ^'Q'7 Industrial Power Systems Engineering. 
^■^" ***^ ' Credit. 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; EE 202. 

Study of the components forming a power system, its economic opera- 
tion; symetncal components and sequence impedances in the study 
of faults and load-flow studies. 



EE438 



Electric Power Transmission. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 437. 

The fundamentals of electric generation, transmission, and distribution. 
Transmission line analysis and performance, circle diagrams. Load flow 
studies. Power system stability. 



PIP* 445 Communications Systems. 
•-r**»J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; EE 302. 

The analysis and design of communication systems. Signal analysis, 
transmission of signals, power density spectra, amplitude, frequency, 
and pulse modulation. Performance of communications systems and 
signal to noise ratio. 



^p* 4CE Control Systems. 
*—^ ***ii/*J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; EE 302. 

Analysis of systems employing feedback. Performance criteria includ- 
ing stability. Design of compensation networks. Techniques of root 
locus, Routh-Hurwitz, Bode and Nyquist. Introduction to modern con- 
trol theory including the concept of state. 

P"P" 4f;o Electromagnetic Waves 
'-■'— •-l'^-'^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 361. 

Electromagnetic wave propagation and reflection in various structures, 
including coaxial, two wire, and waveguide systems. Various modes of 
propagation in rectangular, circular, and coaxial waveguides. The 
dipole antenna. Smith chart techniques. 

P"P" 500 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering. 
^-•'— *-''-"^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Instructor's consent (May be repeated for credit). 
Open to Seniors in Electrical Engineering. Special topics in the field 
of Electrical Engineering. Supervised independent study. Arranged to 
suit the interest and requirements of the student. 



EE 446-447 



Pulse and Digital Circuits I and II. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EE 301, EE 347 

A study of circuits used for digital computers and pulse applications. 
Linear and non-linear wave-shaping, digital logic circuits, switching cir- 
cuits, multivibrators, voltage comparators, negative resistance switching 
circuits, voltage and current sweep circuits. Emphasis in the second 
course on integrated circuit technology and special projects. 



P'P" V^r\A Laboratory Thesis. 
^-•^•- ^jyj'-* Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Instructor's consent. 

Open to Seniors in Electrical Engineering. Students must submit ap- 
proved proposal. Advanced laboratory problems. Students work on 
problems of their selection with the approval of the instructor. 



EE 450-451 



Analysis and Design of Active Networks 

I and II. 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites; EE 301, EE 347. 

Techniques in the analysis and design of active circuits, feedback 
oscillators, operational amplifiers, analog systems, power supplies and 
regulators, power circuits and systems, distortion analysis, silicon con- 
trolled rectifiers, high frequency transistor models, active filters and 
broadbanding techniques. Gyrators and negative impedance converters. 



CrCT ^.C^'S Electrical Engineering Lab. III. 
'—'-■ '-*'^>^ Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; Senior status in Electrical Engineering. 
Laboratory experiments and problems associated with electrical ma- 
chinery, microwaves, digital devices, analog computers, electronic de- 
vices and automatic controls. 

Note; Part-time students are charged for a standard 3-semester-hour 
course. 



ENGINEERING SCIENCE 

Buddy Saleeby, Coordinator 



po 1 O*^ Technology in Modern Society. 
^*^ ' v/O Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Scientific and technological developments and their implications for the 
future of society. Prospects and problems in communications, energy 
sources, automation, transportation, and other technologies. Use and 
control of technological resources for public benefit. 

pre 1 07 Introduction to Engineering. 
^-■^ ' vy • Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Overview of the problems, perspectives, and methods of the engineer- 
ing profession. Modeling of real world problems for purposes of 
optimization, decision making, and design. Practical techniques of 
problem formulation and analysis. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



109 



ENGLISH Paul Marx, Chairman 

Kay Stevenson, Director of Freshman English 



p- A College Preparatory English. 
^'^ One semester. No credit. 

A review of the fundamentals of English for students who do not meet 
the English requirements for admission to the University. Practice given 
m writing as well as in grammar. 

p-pa Reading Laboratory. 
^^ One semester. No credit. 

Helps the student to read faster with greater comprehension, to in- 
crease vocabulary, and to study more effectively. Supervised reading, 
training films, exercises, and discussions. 

Crp* English as a Second Language. 
^•* One semester. No credit. 

Designed for foreign-born students whose English is inadequate to do 
college-level work. Particular emphasis on individual pronunciation 
problems and use of American English idioms. Laboratory required. 

El 1 O English Composition. 
I ' *^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory performance on English Placement Examina- 
tion or completion of EA College Preparatory English. 
Theme writing with emphasis on thematic content, paragraphing, sen- 
tence construction, grammatical principles, and diction. Reading of 
essays to stimulate thought and illustrate rhetorical principles. 

F 1 1 4 Speech. 

'— ' ' ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A disciplined approach to oral communication for freshmen. Objectives 
are to develop proficiency in locating, organizing, and presenting ma- 
terial and to help the student gain confidence and fluency when speak- 
ing extemporaneously. 



E211-212 



E201-202 



World Literature I and II. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: E 113. 

Selected translations of non-Western literature and of Western litera- 
ture from Homer to the present. Emphasis upon literary, cultural, and 
philosophical values. 

P" 0/~Jf5 Composition and Literature. 
*— ^>'-'^-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: E 113. 

Further practice in theme writing. Reading of poetry, fiction, and 

drama in order to develop skill in analyzing and interpreting literature. 



Survey of English Literature I and II. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: E 113, E 206. 

Readings in English Literature from its beginnings to the present, with 

attention to historical and social backgrounds. 



E 213-214 



Survey of American Literature I and II. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: E 113, E 216. 

Intellectual and literary movements from Colonial times to the present, 

with attention to historical and social backgrounds. 



E 21 7-21 8 



Survey of Black American Literature. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Black American poets, novelists, essayists, and dramatists from the 
Colonial Era to the present, including such writers as Frederick 
Douglass, W. E. B. DuBois, Countee Cullen, Richard Wright, James 
Baldwin, Leroi Jones, and Eldridge Cleaver. 



E220 



Writing for Business and Industry. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: E 113. 

Intensive practice in the various types of writing required of execu- 
tives, businessmen, engineers, and other professionals, with emphasis 
on business letters, internal and external reports, evaluations and rec- 
ommendations, descriptions of procedures and processes. 

p" 0*af^ Public Speaking and Group Discussion. 
*— ^■*-''^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Objectives are to develop proficiency m organizing and presenting 
material, and to give practice in speaking, group interaction, con- 
ference management, and small group discussion. 

EpfT/^ The Short Story. 
^^-f^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A critical study of the best stories of American and British writers as 
well as stories, in translation, of writers of other nationalities and 
cultures, French, German, Russian, Latin American, African. 

P" Of? 1 The Essay. 

^- ^•^-' ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A study of the essay and magazine article as characteristic art forms 
of our time. Readings from William Hazlitt to the present. The social 
and historic impact of selected great essays will be considered and 
the structure and art of contemporary essays will be discussed. 



E 267-268 



Creative Writing. 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: E 206 and Instructor's consent. 

Practice in writing the short story, poetry, drama, or non-fiction; 
choice of genre based upon inclination and ability of the student. 
Analysis of published materials and student work. 



no 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



P" 0"7/~) Forms of Contemporary Culture. 
^- ^- / ^<J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A study of contemporary culture In a variety of forms, including drama, 
films, TV. periodicals, music, art. Students will be expected to attend 
performances and exhibitions. The goal of the course is to give the 
student a better understanding of the scope and meaning of con- 
temporary cultural phenomena and to further the development of the 
critical sensibility. 



E353 



E275 



Film Studies. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A consideration of significant full-length feature films selected to rep- 
resent a national school of film-making, a genre, the respective crafts 
of directors, performers and script-writers. Films will be shown in 
class and studied at the rate of about one a week. 



pr *301 Literary Criticism and Scholarship. 
^- *^v-' I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Major critical theories, with readings from Plato and Aristotle to the 
present. Bibliographic tools and methods of research. 



P" *af^O History of the English Language. 
^" *^v^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The development and structure of English, including its Indo-European 
origins and the elements of Anglo-Saxon. Major emphasis on Middle 
English and the transition to Modern English. Some study of the 
distinctive coinage of American English. 



p" OOO The Renaissance in England. 
^- -~>^»^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Major writers of the English Renaissance, in poetry and prose, from 
Wyatt and Surrey in the early sixteenth century through Sidney and 
Spenser to Donne and Milton. 



EOpf2 English Drama to 1642. 
*^^^-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The development of the English drama from its beginnings to the 
middle of the seventeenth century, excluding Shakespeare. Major em- 
phasis upon the Elizabethan and Jacobean drama. 



Literature of the Romantic Era. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Poetry and prose of the major Romantics — Wordsworth, Coleridge, 
Byron, Shelley, Keats, Lamb, and Hazlitt — with attention given to the 
milieu of the writers, the Continental background, and theories of 
Romanticism. 

P" CSR^^ Later Nineteenth-Century English Literature. 
'-■ *-'w\J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Poetry and prose from 1830-1900. The works of Tennyson, Browning, 
Arnold, Swinburne, Carlyle, Mill. Newman, Ruskin, and others studied 
in the light of the social, political, and religious problems of the 
period. 



E361 



Modern British Literature. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

British fiction, drama, and poetry from 1900 to the present. Includes 
works of Conrad, Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, Huxley, Forster, Shaw, Yeats, 
Auden, Spender, and Dylan Thomas. 



P" Of50 The Age of Donne and Milton. 
^- *3vP^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Major writers of prose and poetry during the period 1600-1660: Donne, 
Milton, Burton, Bacon, Herbert, and others. 



E371 



Literature of the Neoclassic Era. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

British writers of the period 1660-1760, with emphasis upon Dryden, 
Pope, Swift, Johnson, and others. 



EO'yCi The Age of Chaucer. 
*^ ' ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A detailed reading and critical study of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, 
with some study of his predecessors and the medieval cultural milieu. 

EOQ/^ The English Novel I. 

*-'^'^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The development of the novel in England from Defoe to Dickens and 
Thackeray. 

EOQ1 The English Novel II. 

*-*^ ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The development of the novel in England from George Eliot and Hardy 
to the present. 



E 341-342 



Shakespeare. 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 

E 341 is a prerequisite for E 342. 

Introduction to representative comedies, histories, plays, tragedies, and 

poems. 



E392 



Literature of the American Renaissance. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Intensive study of the writings of such figures as Emerson, Thoreau, 
Hawthorne, Melville, and Whitman, whose works are analyzed in the 
light of the influences and traditions which led to America's cultural 
independence. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



111 



EA.C^'^ Modern Poetry. 
^^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A study of the works of representative twentieth-century British, 
American, and Continental poets. 



FINANCE Jeffrey L. Williams, Chairman 



E405 



IVIodern Drama. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Principal movements in Continental, British, and American drama from 
Ibsen to the present. 



EAC^f^ A.C^Q Continental Literature. 
*-ryj^~*^^^^ Credit, 3 semester hours each course. 

Selected poetry, drama, and fiction, in translation, of the European 
masters, primarily Russian, French, German, or Spanish. Topic to be 
announced for each semester. 



Fl 113 



Business Finance. 
Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 111 or Instructor's consent. 

Brief study of the unincorporated business enterprise. The modern 
corporation. Basic security types of stocks and bonds, capital struc- 
ture, promotion, investment, banking, government regulation, admin- 
istration, sources and uses of working capital, expansion, combina- 
tions, mergers, refinancing and recapitalization, and failure and 
reorganization. 



E,4 1 1 ,4. 1 ^ ^^^ Literature of Africa. 
^' ' ' ~^' ' ^ Credit, 6 semester hours. 

The chief writings, in English and in translation, of the prose writers, 
poets, and dramatists of the African nations. 

E^o 1 Contemporary Jewish Writers in America. 
^^ ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Intensive study of the poetry, prose, and drama of such writers as 
Shapiro, Ginsberg, Bellow, Malamud, Miller, Roth, Friedman, and others 
whose works have been influenced by their Jewish heritage and by 
the American literary tradition. 



E478 



Modern American Literature. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Intensinve study of twentieth-century American fiction, poetry, and 
drama. Readings in the works of such writers as Faulkner, Hemingway, 
Eliot, O'Neill, Wolfe, Roethke, Lowell, Arthur Miller, and Tennessee Wil- 
liams. 



E^Qi ^QQ Studies in Literature. 
*+0 I -*+^0 Credit, 3 semester hours each course. 

Special topics in literature which may include concentration upon a 
single figure, a group of writers, or a literary theme. Several sections, 
each on a different topic, may run concurrently. 



CTI O '1 ^ Principles of Real Estate 
■^ ■ ^ ' ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: QA 118, and QA 128. 

This course deals specifically with the single and multiple dwelling 
unit. Stressed are brokerage, mortgage financing, investments, man- 
agement, and valuation as it applies to Commercial and Industrial Real 
Estate. 



FI227 



Risk and Insurance. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; MG 125. 

The importance of risk in business affairs; risk situations analyzed; 
the different methods of meeting risk considered; extended considera- 
tion given to the various forms of insurance coverage. 



RooQ Financial Management. 
^^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Fl 113. 

Analytical techniques for dealing with financial problems and their 
application to corporate financial management. Capital budgeting, 
cost of funds, capital structure, valuation, and some aspects of in- 
vestment problems. 



E599 



Independent Study. 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with a 

maximum of 12. 

Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of department. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member to 
explore an area of interest to him. This course must be initiated by 
the student. 



FI230 



investments. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Fl 113 or EC 134 or Instructor's consent. 
Investment media and institutions in the capital markets, the determina- 
tion of investment values, and the analytical tools of investment 
appraisal and portfolio management. 



112 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



FI325 



International Finance. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: QA 118, A 111, and A 112. 

This course familiarizes the student with various banl(ing institutions 
engaged in hnancing international business transactions. The impact 
of national policy on business behavior is studied. 



RO^E Financial Institutions and Capital Markets. 
•^^■^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: QA 128. 

The relationship between the financial system and the level, growth, 
and stability of economic activity. The theory, structure, and regula- 
tion of financial markets and institutions. The role of capital market 
yields as the price mechanism that allocates saving into economic in- 
vestment. 



rzc *^r\A_ ^"^ Detection and Control w/Lab. 
~ ^ Ow*+ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. 
Heat, sensitivity, thermostats, fusible elements, fire detection systems, 
design and layouts, alarm systems, power sources, safeguards, munici- 
pal alarm systems, construction, installation and maintenance require- 
ments, standards and codes. Automatic extinguishing systems, design 
and layout of water, gas, and power systems. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



p-O AC\^ *fson Investigation w/Lab. 
~ ^ *-r\J^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. 
Methods used in starting fires and methods of detection of fires started 
by arsonists. Instrumental methods that may be used to assist in the 
investigation of fires started under suspicious circumstances. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



FIRE SCIENCE Roger P. Lanahan, Director 



pre OO 1 Essentials of Fire Chemistry w/Lab. 
I .J •JKJ i ci-gjjt 3 semester hours. 

Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. 
The examination of the chemical requirements for combustion, the 
chemistry of fuels and explosive mixtures, and the study of the vari- 
ous methods of stopping combustion of fires. Analysis of the proper- 
ties of materials affecting fire behavior. Detailed examination of the 
basic properties of fire. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



FS302 



Principles of Fire Science Technology w/Lab. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. 
Effect of fire on different types of construction, classes of occupancy 
hazard, levels of private and public protection, degrees of exterior 
exposure. Types of building construction, private water supplies, 
municipal water supplies, and combination systems. Methods of em- 
ployee fire control. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



pre '30'^ ^^'^ Protection Fluids and Systems. 
* -^ 0*-yO Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Three lecture periods a week. 

Chemical properties of fluids used in fire suppression systems and 
operations. Design of water supply and distribution for fire protection. 
Laboratory study of operational and hydraulics problems. 



FS403 



Process and Transportation Hazards. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Three lecture periods a week. 

Special hazards of industrial processing, manufacturing and the trans- 
portation of products and personnel. Analytical approach to hazard 
evaluation and control. Reduction of fire hazards in manufacturing 
processes. 



p-O AC^/y Special Hazards Control. 
' ^ *-r\J*-* Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Three lecture periods a week. 

Types of industrial processes requiring special fire protection treat- 
ment such as heating equipment, flammable liquids, gases, and dusts. 
Emphasis on fundamental theories involved, inspection methods, deter- 
mination of relative hazard, application of codes and standards, and 
economics of installed protection systems. 



FS 498-499 



Research Project 
Credit, 3 semester hours 
over two semester period. 

One lecture per week — FS 498: credit, 1 semester hour. 

One lecture and one laboratory session per week — FS 499: credit, 2 

semester hours. 

Development of a student project and a written report in a specified 

area in fire administration, or fire science technology with faculty 

supervision. Grade awarded upon completion of project. This is a two 

semester course with FS 498 as a prerequisite for FS 499. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



113 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Bruce A. French, Coordinator 



FR 101-102 



Elementary French. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Stresses pronunciation, aural and reading comprehension, basic con- 
versation, and the fundamental principles of grammar. 



FR201-202 



Intermediate French. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: French 101-102 or equivalent. 

Stresses the reading comprehension of modern prose texts and a re- 
view of grammar necessary for this reading. Students are encouraged 
to do some reading in their own areas of interest. 



FR301-302 



Main Currents of French Literature. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: FR 201-202 or equivalent. 

Writings representative of significant currents in French literature from 
the Middle Ages to the Twentieth Century. Opportunity to improve 
listening and speaking ability. Conducted in French. Laboratory 
optional, but recommended. 



GR101-102 



Elementary German. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Stresses pronunciation, aural and reading comprehension, basic con- 
versation, and the fundamental principles of grammar. 



RU201-202 



Intermediate Russian. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: RU 101-102 or the equivalent. 

Stresses the reading comprehension of modern Russian prose and a 
review of grammar necessary for this reading. Students are encouraged 
to do some reading in their own areas of interest. Scientific Russian 
is encouraged for those in the sciences. 



SP 101-102 



Elementary Spanish. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Stresses pronunciation, aural and reading comprehension, basic con- 
versation, and the fundamental principles of grammar. 



SP201-202 



Intermediate Spanish. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SP 101-102 or equivalent. 

Stresses the reading comprehension of modern prose texts and a re- 
view of grammar necesary for this reading. Students are encouraged 
to do some reading in their own areas of interest. 



SP301-302 



Main Currents of Spanish Literature. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SP 201-202 or equivalent. 

Writings representative of significant currents in Spanish literature 
from the Middle Ages to the Twentieth Century. Opportunity to improve 
speaking and listening ability. Conducted in Spanish. Laboratory op- 
tional, but recommended. 



GR201-202 



Intermediate German. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: GR 101-102 or the equivalent. 

Stresses the reading comprehension of modern prose texts and a re- 
view of grammar necessary for this reading. Texts used in the course 
are selected from many areas of study including physics, biology, and 
chemistry and students are encouraged to do individualized readings in 
their own areas of interest. 



HISTORY Thomas Katsaros, Chairman 



RU 101-102 



Elementary Russian. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Stresses pronunciation, aural and reading comprehension, basic con- 
versation, and the fundamental principles of grammar. This course is 
usually offered every other year, unless demand requires it be taught 
every year. 



HS 111 



Western Civilization I: to 1700. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Western Civilization from the ancient beginnings to mid-seventeenth 
century. The patterns of the social, cultural, and political aspects of 
ancient, medieval, and early modern eras that have shaped the Western 
tradition. 



114 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



HS 112 



Western Civilization II: from 1700 to present. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: HS 111. 

European history from the Enlightenment to the present. Emphasis on 
economic and social changes, political history, the expansion of 
Europe and its international effects. Nationalism, imperialism, and 
socialism stressed. 



|_jo OOI Comparative European Political Systems. 
n^ ^^ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 111-112. 

Historical, comparative approach to the political institutions of the 

United Kingdom, U.S.S.R., Federal Republic of Germany, and France. 

Emphasis on the relationship between Western and Eastern political 

systems. 



HS 114 



The Economic History of the Western World. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: HS 112. 

From pre-industrial Europe to the present. Impact of the Industrial 
Revolution and World Wars on national policies, labor, business, inter- 
national economics. The economic development of Western Europe in 
its relation to Soviet Russia and the United States. 



1_JC 1 01 History of Science. 
''''^ 1^1 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A survey of the history of science and technology from antiquity to 
the modern period. Particular attention is given to the social and his- 
torical process as an essential aspect of the development of scientific 
concepts. 



I_|C 1 'Q 1 History of the Black Man in America. 
'■*-' I O I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A comprehensive study of Black People in the United States, including 
African antecedents and an account of slavery. Emancipation and its 
aftermath, and Black People's contributions to the Modern Era. 



I_|C 01 1 American History to 1865. 
''^' ^ ' ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The development of the American nation from colonial times to 1865. 
Significant economic, social, political, and institutional developments. 



I-IQ ^^*^ ^^ Diplomatic History. 
n*^ ^^O Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 211 and HS 212. 

The ideas, trends, and actions of U. S. Diplomacy from the American 

Revolution to the Spanish-American War; from the emergence of the 

United States as a world power to the foreign policy of the Nuclear 

Age. 



HS231 



Modern Asia. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The ideological and traditional socio-political-economic-diplomatic back- 
ground of East, South, and Southeast Asia, the area's development since 
the impact of the West in the 16th century and the responses to this 
impact. 



HS308 



Social and Intellectual History of the 

United States. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 211-212. 

Leading ideas that have shaped important periods of American his- 
tory. The colonial mind and spirit, the democratic upheaval, sectional- 
ism — war — and reconstruction, the industrialization of the country, 
religion as it met the new age of science and economics, agrarian 
revolt, overseas possessions, the beginning of the end of isolation. 



LJC 1 /^ The History of Modern England. 
m^ *-J l\J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 111-112. 

British institutions and industrial life from 1688 to the present. Traces 
the movement of British society from its eighteenth-century aristo- 
cratic base through the Liberal experiment of the nineteenth- to twen- 
tieth-century collectivism; England's role in international affairs. 



1_IC 01 O American History from 1865. 
' '*^ fci 1 ^. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

United States history from the Reconstruction through the contem- 
porary era. Expanding industrialism, the changing concepts of the role 
of government, and the United States in world affairs. 



|_|C 01 1 American Colonial and Revolutionary History 
no Oil ,5 1789. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 211-212. 

The political, social and intellectual history of the British Colonies In 
North America leading to the American Revolution; the Revolutionary 
period and the creation of a republican society. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



115 



HS312 



The U. S. in the Twentieth Century. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 211-212. 

Political history, social trends, and intellectual movements. Study of 
the expansion of the functions of government to meet modern complex 
problems arising from social and cultural trends and from the involve- 
ment of the United States in global politics. 



HS330 



History of Russia. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 111-112. 

From the thirteenth century, with particular emphasis on the transi- 
tion from an agrarian to an industrial society in the period since the 
emancipation of the serfs in 1861. The role of the U.S.S.R. in world 
affairs since the Revolution of 1917; its impact upon Asia and the 
West. 



|_|C *31 ,A The History of Germany from 1B48. 
n^ *^ ' ** Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 111-112. 

From the Treaty of Westphalia to the unification of Germany, the 
imperial era, the two World Wars, and the rise and fall of National 
Socialism to the problems of divided Germany today. 



HS315 



The History of Europe in the Nineteenth Century. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 111-112. 

The main political, economic, and intellectual trends in Europe in the 
period from 1815 to 1914. The effects of industrialism, liberalism, 
and socialism on European society and culture. In international affairs, 
the impact of nationalism on European power politics and the failure 
of the major powers to resolve their differences in the Balkans. 



|_1C 1 "7 Renaissance and Reformation. 
n^ O I y Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 111-112. 

Economic, political, intellectual, and religious developments in Con- 
tinental Europe from 1300 to 1650; intellectual and social change 
during the transition from medieval to modern times; dynastic con- 
flicts within the emerging state system. 



HS321 



The History of Ancient Greece and Rome. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 111-112. 

From the Homeric period to the year 500 A.D. Events, institutions, 

and ideas that have shaped the Western tradition. The political, social, 

economic, and cultural problems that caused the decline of these 

civilizations. 



HS325 



Europe in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth 

Centuries. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The cultural, political, and economic life of Europe from triumphant 
Classicism to the French Revolution. The Enlightenment: Prelude to 
Revolution and the Napoleonic Period. 



11 C OOK Modern European Intellectual Thought. 
11^ >^>DZj Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A history of the intellectual, political, scientific and social thought from 
the Renaissance to modern times. Special emphasis will be placed on 
those ideologies that have shaped and influenced the modern world. 

|_|C OKI O^Q Selected Studies in History. 
n^ Oi? I -OJJO Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Special topics in History dealing with the modern world. A study in 
depth of vital historical issues. 

|_JC Ar\^ Europe in the Twentieth Century. 
n^ *+W I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The history of Western and Central Europe since World War I viewed 
from the perspective of Europe's rapidly changing role in world ttis- 
tory. Europe's political, social, and economic adjustment to the Russian 
Revolution and Nazism, the emergence of America and Russia as super- 
powers, and the loss of overseas possessions. 



HS406 



Modern Japanese History. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The institutional and cultural traditions of Japan, the nature of 
Japan's feudal society after 1600, and the interplay of indigenous and 
foreign elements in the changes which affected thought, politics, and 
society. After the coming of Perry, the adoption and reflection of 
parliamentary government and the reforms that followed World War II. 

|_|C A.C^'y Colonial and Early Latin America. 
n^ *+v-» / Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 111-112, 211-212. 

European and Indian origins, the formation of a colonial society and 
culture in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the background 
and course of anti-colonial upheaval in the early nineteenth century, 
the problems from the post-independence period to 1890. 

LJC Af^Q The History of Modern Latin America. 
n^ ^t'^O Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 111-112,211-212. 

Latin America since 1890, including the distinctive histories of the 
major nations of Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, and Chile as well as the 
characteristics, problems, and prospects of the area as a whole. Inter- 
American relations and current revolutionary movements. 



116 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



HS409 



Modern Chinese History. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The traditional society as it existed prior to the Opium War, China's 
confrontation with the West and its effect on political, intellectual, and 
economic developments. The formation and evolution of the present 
Chinese regime. 



LJO ^1 pv A History of the Middle East. 
n-^ *•* i^^-f Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The rise and spread of Islam and the development of an Arabic civili- 
zation. Primary attention on Turkey, Egypt, and Iran, the problems 
created by the Western impact on the peoples and governments of the 
area, the effect of the Zionist movement on Middle East politics. 



Lie ^1 O A History of Africa in Modern Times. 
'•*-' ^" ' *-* Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Morocco, Algeria. Tunisia, and Libya, stressing the institutional histories 
of these countries, which enabled them ultimately to expel European 
imperialism. The second part of the course deals with nineteenth- 
century Africa, the partition of Sub-Sahara Africa by the European 
powers, the period of colonial domination, and the emergence of the 
independent states after 1945. 



HS462 



l_iC ^1 C Historiography. 

* '^-' ^ • *^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The development of schools of historical thought and 
from Thucydides to Toynbee. 



interpretation 



The History of the Commercial and 
Industrial Structure and Management 
Practices of the Soviet Union. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 112, HS 114, EC 133, EC 134. 
The Pre-1917 background. War, Communism and the NEP. Patterns of 
growth and the changing structure of the Soviet industrial and man- 
agement practices. Problems of planning; organizational framework; the 
implementation of Marxism as an economic system. 



i_JO A_f^*^ ^^^ Business and Economic History of Modern Asia 
ti>3 *-t'\J>D Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 231, EC 133, EC 134. 

The historical development of the Asian economy in the 19th and 20th 
centuries, with emphasis on the postwar period. The cooperative stages 
of industrialization in Japan, China, Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philip- 
pines. The impact of Asian business upon the Western and Communist 
world. 



HS464 



The Post War Economic and Business 
Developments in Europe. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 112, HS 114, EC 133, EC 134. 
Europe in World Trade and payments: Europe and the underdeveloped 
world. The European Economic Community; its development and its 
relation to the United States and the rest of the world. An analytical 
approach to business decisions and centralized planning. 



HS416 



Senior Seminar. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The undertaking of an independent study and research project present- 
ed in an oral and written form. Recommended for all History majors 
in their senior year. 



HS 461, 462, 463, 464, 466 for Business majors only. Liberal Arts 
majors may only take these courses as electives. 



HS466 



Latin American Business. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134, HS 407, HS 408, HS 461. 
The course will deal with problems of growth facing the Latin American 
enterprises. Intra-American business relations, regional integration and 
world trade will be analyzed. Special emphasis will be placed on the 
industrialization of Argentina, Brazil and Mexico. 



I_|0 /1£^1 The History of the Economic Development 
'•*-' ^■^ ' of Latin America 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134, HS 407, HS 408. 
The economic development of Latin America since the period of inde- 
pendence and its relation to the rest of the world. The history of Latin 
America's special relationship with the United States. The importance 
of Latin America's role in international trade and commerce. 



Lie RQQ Independent Study. 
•■^ ^C7S? Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with 
a maximum of 12. 

Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of department. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be initiated 
by the student. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



117 



HOTEL, RESTAURANT, INSTITUTIONAL MANAGE- 
MENT, TOURISM AND TRAVEL 

Howard Fidler, Chairman 



HM201 



Front Office Aiiministration. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; Instructor's permission. 

To make the student aware of the wotV. flow connected with front 
office procedures. The preparation of the Night Audit is stressed. The 
student is introduced to the Art of Inn-Keeping. 



HM 101 



Laws of Inn-Keeping. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: LA 101 or Instructor's permission. 
Historical development of the common inn. The peculiarities of the 
inn-keeper-guest relationship are stressed. Responsibility of inn-keeper 
and use of inn-keeper's lien is emphasized. 



HM302 



Purchasing and Control. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Instructor's permission. 

Introduction to the purchasing, receiving and issuing of food and 

beverages. The identification of grades and specifications determining 

quality of purchased items is emphasized. Cost control procedures are 

stressed. 



UIV4 1 0*5 Principles of Hotel Management. 
niVI I WO Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Introduces the student to hotel and restaurant operations. History of 
the industry with special emphasis on current trends. Various opera- 
tions within the industry are analyzed. 

I— IK/I 1 O/l Procedures and Techniques in Hotel Management 
n IVI I W*+ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The Administrative, management procedures and techniques of plan- 
ning, control, and personnel in the hospitality area. 



HM 150 



Management Decision Making. 
(Production Management). 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Instructor's permission. 

Presents the current methods and principles of food production as 
practiced by the food service industry. Quality control, portion and cost 
control, menu planning are emphasized. 



HM 165 



Tourism. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Introduces to the student the numerous aspects of tourism as related 
to the hotel-motel industry. Foreign and domestic tourism and business 
travel are all reviewed. 



UJK^ 1 f^f^ Touristic Geography. 
n IVl I \J\J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: HM 165. 

A course examining the development of the touristic areas of every 
major travel destination. To what areas are travelers journeying and 
what developments are taking place on a world wide basis to attract 
an increasing number of tourists, whether individuals, pleasure groups 
or business conventions. 



HKA OO 1 Principles of Hotel and Restaurant Administration. 
'"• O^ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MG 125. 

Practices and systems used m hotels and restaurants. Controls, use 
and interpretation of financial statements. All operations and special- 
ized industry procedures. 



HM322 



Markets and Promotion of Public Services. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MK 105. 

Aspects of the services market with emphasis on consumer behavior. 
Internal and externa! stimulation of sales in competitive and non- 
competitive markets, and the vagaries of environmental concept. Ex- 
perimental techniques embodied in industry sponsored sales-blitz 
activities. 



LiRyi OOC Food and Beverage Control. 
n '"' O^iP Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Current methods and principles of food and beverage storage, service, 
merchandising, issuing, as practiced by the hospitality industry. Phases 
covered on a rotating basis include menu planning, employee training, 
advertising and promotion, wine-cellar operation, music and entertain- 
ment, pre-cost procedures, payroll analysis. 



I— I N/l /1 1 O ^"^^^ Systems and Operations. 
n lYI *+ I \J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Instructor's permission. 

Analysis and evaluation of hotel systems and operations. Emphasis on 
analytical techniques, systems, computer-assisted operations, and 
change-induced problems. 



118 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



HM411 



Equipment, Layout, and Design. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The concept of building management is presented as demonstrating the 
interdependence of planning, construction, equipment, maintenance, 
personnel and on-premise customer. Develop layout studies, design 
equipment, estimate budget. 

HRyi CIO Seminar in Hotel Management. 
IVI ZJ I ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A rigorous examination of competing concepts of the role of the serv- 
ice organization in society. An integrative course relating the individual 
operation to the production schedule, merchandising, environment and 
the various economic stresses. 

I— I IWI C>QQ Independent Study. 
niVl iJZ7Z7 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

With permission from the Chairman of the Department of Hotel and 
Restaurant Administration, students may engage in independent re- 
search projects and other approved phases of independent study. 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Francis J. Costello, Chairman 



IE 106 



IE 102 



Introduction to Computers: FORTRAN. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 109 or Equivalent. 

An introductory course in computers and FORTRAN for the Engineering 
and science students. The concept of stored program computers is 
developed, and the student is taught the basics of the FORTRAN 
language. The role of problem analysis, program analysis, and program- 
ming techniques are presented. Several problems are programmed and 
debugged by the student and run on the campus computer facility. 

Laboratory Fee: $3.00. 



IE 104 



Computer Systems Design. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Introduction to computer based systems design. Linking of subsystems 
that are mutually interrelated and interdependent. Development of 
data files and data banks. 



ICT 1 O^ Introduction to Computers: COBOL. 
'^ I v-'iJ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 109 or Equivalent. 

An introductory course in the application of the computer to the 
needs of today's society for the business, social science, and art 
students. Student use of data processing facilities of the campus 
computer center, problem solving, logic theory, and the understanding 
of software packages are put into practice. Student learns how to 
develop flow charts and writes and debugs programs in COBOL. 

Laboratory Fee: $3.00. 



Safety Organization and Management. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Pill. 

History and development of safety movement, nature and extent of 
problem, development of workmen's compensation, development of safe- 
ty program, cost analysis techniques, locating and defining accident 
sources, analysis of the human element, employee training, medical 
service and facilities, and the what and how of the Occupational Safety 
and Health Act. 



1p- 1 /~)"7 Introduction to Data Processing. 
C \\J / Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Introduction to the concepts, capabilities and limitations of electronic 
data processing. Use of network systems, software packages and com- 
puter services. Project oriented — no programming required. (For pro- 
gramming techniques and the above refer to IE 105). 



IE 119 



Industrial Safety and Hygiene. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 214 or MG 125. 

A basic course in industrial accident prevention and industrial hygiene, 
covering: managerial accident prevention functions and responsibil- 
ities; injury data development, usage, and validity; machine guarding 
techniques and guard development, including point-of-operation drives; 
personal protective equipment; fire prevention and control, including 
flammable solvents, dusts, and their characteristics; electrical hazards, 
hand tools, power and manual; employee training; communications; 
hazard analysis; accident investigation. Industrial hygiene problems 
caused by solvents, dusts, noise, radiation are studied, as well as 
regulatory bodies, laws, and catastrophe hazards. 



IE 201 



Accident Conditions and Controls. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 106. 

ti/lechanical hazards, machine and equipment guarding, boilers and 
pressure vessels, structural hazards, materials handling hazards and 
equipment use, electrical hazards, personal protective equipment. 



IP" 00,4. Engineering Economics. 
^ ^W*-K Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 116 or M 117. 

A quantitative analysis of applied economics in engineering practice; 
the economy study for comparing alternatives; interest formulae; 
quantitative methods of comparing alternatives; intangible considera- 
tions; selection and replacement economy for machines and struc- 
tures; break-even and minimum cost points; depreciation; relationship 
of accounting to the economy study; review of current industrial 
practices. Promotes logical decisions through the consideration of 
alternative courses of action. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



119 



IP" o 1 ^ Management Theory. 
^ ^ • ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Status. 

Provides insight into the elements of the managerial process and 
develops a rational synthesis of the mass of detail comprising the 
subject matter of management. Focusing largely upon the complex 
problems of top and middle-level management, this course investigates 
what managers do under given circumstances, yet stresses the on- 
going activities of management as part of an integrated, continuous 
process. 



IP" OO^ Advanced FORTRAN Programming. 
'^ ^^*+ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 102 and M 115. 

Introduces the student to advanced FORTRAN programming and en- 
courages student utility of the campus computer facility and its 
peripheral devices. Various typical engineering and scientific computer 
applications are discussed and demonstrated. Problem solving inno- 
vations are presented. The last few weeks are devoted to an intro- 
duction of the business language, COBOL. 

Laboratory Fee: $8.00. 



IE 225 



Ip- oi fr Elements of Industrial Hygiene. 
iC ^ I \J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 106. PH 103-104, OH 103. 

Analysis of toxic substances and their effect on the human body, 
analysis and effect of chemical hazards, physical hazards of electro- 
magnetic and ionizing radiation, abnormal temperature and pressure, 
noise, ultrasonic and low frequency vibration: sampling techniques in- 
cluding detector tubes, particulate sampling, noise measurement, and 
radiation detection: Governmental and Industrial Hygiene Standard 
Codes. 

Laboratory Fee: $5.00. 



ip- Oi -T industrial Safety Auxiliary Functions. 
1^ ^ I ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 106, IE 201. 

All aspects of the legal constraints applicable to the occupational 
safety field are examined. Included are OSHA, Federal laws not under 
OSHA jurisdiction, selected state legislation, current and pending 
product liability laws, environmental protection laws and fire safety 
codes. Consideration will be made for emphasizing particular legal 
areas as requested. 



IE 223 



Personnel Administration. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 214 or MG 125. 

Provides a foundation in fundamental concepts and a general knowl- 
edge of techniques in the administration of personnel relations. The 
nature of personnel administration, the handling of personnel prob- 
lems, employee attitudes and morale. Techniques of personnel admin- 
istration: recruitment, interviews, placement, training, employee rating, 
as well as wage policies and administration. In order to secure breadth 
and depth in the approach to personnel problems, simple case studies 
are used at appropriate points throughout the course. 



Advanced COBOL Programming and Introductory 

FORTRAN 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 105. 

Introduces the student to advanced techniques in programming and 

debugging programs written in COBOL for the campus computer. 

Various typical systems, analyses, and applications are discussed and 

demonstrated. The last few weeks are devoted to an introduction of 

writing and debugging problems written in the scientific language, 

FORTRAN. 

Laboratory Fee: $8.00. 



I p- O O 1 Terminal and Remote Job Entry Systems. 
'^ ^O I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 202 or IE 105. 

Introduction to the philosophy of terminal usage and remote job entry 
systems. Appropriate development of control, protection and integrity 
of programs and files accessible by a multitude of users. Review of 
data communications network. 

Laboratory Fee: $8.00. 



ip- OOO Cost Control. 

'^ ^0*3 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 115. 

Basic analysis of cost control techniques. Designed to give members 
of the management team the underlying rudiments of cost control 
systems they will be using and by which they will be measured and 
controlled. Theory of standard costs, flexible budgeting, and overhead 
handling techniques emphasized by analytical problem solution. 



IE 234 



Production Control. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 214 or MG 125; and M 115. 

The basic principles that govern production control in an industrial 
plant. These principles are worked out in the problems of procuring 
and controlling materials, in planning, routing, scheduling, and dis- 
patching. Familiarizes the student with present and new methods used 
in this field, including 0. R. techniques. 



120 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



IP" p^O Work Analysis. 

' ^- ^'+*-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 115. 

An introductory course in Motion Analysis. IVlettiods Analysis, and Work 
Measurement. Motion and Methods Analysis lectiniques include tlie 
Principles of Motion Economy, Process Analysis charting, Operations 
Analysis, Activity Analysis, and Work Design Layout Analysis. Students 
are required to design a work place project which will be filmed on 
CCTV for analysis. 

Work measurement includes an introduction to Time Study funda- 
mentals and Pre-Determined Time Systems. 

Laboratory Fee: $8.00. 



ICT OPO Operating Systems. 
'•— ^-'^■^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 102 or IE 105, IE 336. 

Introduction to operating systems, job control language and general 

structure of operating systems. Priority control structure and input/ 

output routines with interrupt level and cycle-stealing philosophy also 

included. 

Laboratory Fee: $8.00. 



IE 335 



IE 325 



APL/Basic. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 231 

Exposure to the use of languages developed specifically for terminal 
use in an attempt to acquaint the student with instantaneous pro- 
gramming and problem solving via a centralized computer facility. 

Laboratory Fee: $8.00. 



Simulations and Applications. 
Credit. 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 224, IE 225. 

Evaluation of mathematical modeling of a system (business or scien- 
tific/ engineering-oriented) geared towards program simulation. Canned 
simulation programs (e.g.; Business Games, GASP, GPSS) will be 
evaluated and run. 

Laboratory Fee: $8.00. 



IP" OO^ Hardware Operation. 
'^ *^*^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 224, IE 225. 

Hands on computer operation of programs written by the student. Use 
of all I/O devices will be included along with description of disk 
monitoring system control. 

Laboratory Fee: $8.00. 



IP" 'ZiAA Advanced Work Analysis. 
^ »J**** Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 243. 

A course extending the principles introduced in the prerequisite course 
including the development of Standard Data Systems, formula con- 
struction in standard data, Methods-Time-Measurement and Master 
Standard Data predetermined time systems. Work Sampling, Standards 
on Indirect Work, Wage Payment Plans, and the use of Closed Circuit 
TV as a Methods training tool. 

Laboratory Fee: $8.00. 



IP Q*:iP PL/I and RPG. 

' *— *-^<-'^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 102, IE 105. 

Development of the use of PL/1, a combination business-oriented and 
scientific/engineering-oriented high-level computer language; and 
RPG, a report generating special language useful to the generation of 
multi-styled reports. 

Laboratory Fee: $3.00. 



IP" O^^ Statistical Analysis. 
'^ *->**\J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 118 

Provides an introduction to the application of statistical techniques to 
industrial and engineering problems, probability and distribution 
theory, measures of central tendency and dispersion in relation to 
population and samples, as well as applications of algebraic methods 
in industrial practice, including advanced statistical methods. 



IP '^'^A Assembler Language. 
' *— '^<^*-r Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 102, IE 105, 

Description of the functional characteristics of a computer main stor- 
age and peripheral unit structure along with the monitoring system 
control function via the use of the Assembler Language. 

Laboratory Fee: $3.00. 



IP 0^*7 Probability Analysis. 
'^ 0«+ y Credit. 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: QA 216 or IE 346. 

Develops the theory of probability and related applications. Introduces 
such relevant areas as: combinations and permutations, probability 
space, laws of large numbers, random variables, conditional probabil- 
ity, Bayes' Theory, Markov chains, and stochastic processes. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



121 



I pr A^O Computer Facilities Design. 
'^- '+^>-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 233. 

Introduction to methods of evaluating corporate computer facility needs 
as a result defmed job type and job mix. Techniques are examined for 
effective determination of vendor offerings in terms of hardware capa- 
bilities to accommodate corporate needs. 



IP C107 Systems Analysis (General). 
'^ i?W / Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Junior status required. 

Presents the analytical and conceptual techniques upon which sys- 
tems analysis and development is based, and applications to non- 
business as well as business operations. Development of case studies 
and their applications independently oriented to the student's major 
area of interest. 



IP" A,*^f^ Quality Control. 

'^" *+*^^J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 346. 

Economics of quality control; modern methods used by industry to 
achieve quality of product; preventing defects; organizing for quality; 
locating chronic sources of trouble; coordinating specifications, manu- 
facturing, and inspection; measuring process capability, using inspec- 
tion data to regulate manufacturing processes; control charts; selection 
of modern sampling plans. 



IP /L/\/^ Facilities Planning. 

'^ '**+*-> Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 243, IE 204. 

Factors in plant location, design, and layout of equipment. The basic 

principles of obtaining information essential for carrying out such 

investigations. Survey of such practices as material handling, storage 

and storeroom maintenance, and use of service departments in modern 

factories. 

Laboratory Fee: $8.00. 



IP K/^O Operations Research. 
'^- *J'-'^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: QA 216 or IE 346. 

The Operations Research area is oriented to various mathematical and 
near-mathematical methods for getting answers to certain kinds of 
business problems. Simulation including Monte Carlo, queuing, the 
Flood method for assigning jobs, the transportation method, and linear 
programming including the simplex method with both algebraic solu- 
tion and tableaus. 



I p CO A Systems Analysis (Business and Engineering). 
' *— iJWO Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 214 or MG 125. and M 115. 

Presents the analytical and conceptual techniques upon which systems 
analysis and development is based, and applications to business and 
industrial fields. Development of case studies and their applications 
independently oriented to the student's major area of interest. 



IE510 



Business Games: 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 214 or MG 125; and QA 216 or IE 346. 
The Business Games area gives the student the opportunity of corre- 
lating his entire course of study in a management simulation frame- 
work. These training games make use of simulation models that 
explore specihc management areas in depth. Operations research 
techniques of scientific management are developed. The purposes of 
these games are as follows: (1) to serve as a framework for training 
sessions in basic management principles; (2) to serve as an introduc- 
tion to the problem of manufacturing management; (3) to serve as a 
focal point for management development discussion of long-range plan- 
ning and decision assisting tools; (4) to show the student the use of 
modern electronic computer methods. 



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

Shiv Sawhney, Chairman 



I p ^r\A Laboratory — Thesis. 

• *— ■*Jvy'+ Credit, 3 or 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Senior I.E. status. 

Advanced laboratory testing and special problems. The student works 
on problems of his own selection which have been outlined by him 
and have received approval. They may be in the form of a semester 
thesis or a series of original experiments. 



IB312 



International Business. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MK 105. 

An analysis of the business environments, with special emphasis on 
similarities and differences between the nations of the world, with a 
view to develop intercultural managerial effectiveness. The focus of 
the course is to relate business functions and responsibilities to the 
cultural and physical dimensions of the environment. 



122 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



ID O 1 O International Marketing Management. 
D "^ • "^ Credit. 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; IB 312. 

Application of management principles in international marketing de- 
cision-making. Study of international marketing management will en- 
able students to perceive the similarities and differences between 
countries which have bearing on the development of marketing goals, 
organization structure, product policies, distribution systems, promo- 
tional techniques and pricing strategies within the context of the en- 
vironments of foreign countries. 



JOURNALISM Douglas Robillard, Dean 



J lOl 



Journalism I. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A survey of journalism designed to acquaint students with the profes- 
sion. The American newspaper as a social institution and a medium 
of communication. The reporting of public affairs and elementary 
editing. 



J 102 



|D o^i Operations of the Multinational Corporation. 
' ^ »^^ ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The course deals with the specific problems encountered by multi- 
national firms in the management of their operations in different coun- 
tries. The course will attempt to develop sensitivity on the part of the 
students in identification, definition and analysis of these problems. The 
instruction will also focus on the viability of investment decisions, 
the problems of planning and control, and the social responsibilities of 
the firm to host nations. Multinational corporations will also be viewed 
in their role as transfer agents for products, technology, organization 
and human skills from one country to another. 



IB415 



Comparative Management. 
Credit. 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IB 312 and MG 125. 

The analysis and examination of business behavior and organizations 
against a background of diversified culture systems. A conceptual 
framework is developed for the analysis of interaction between or- 
ganizational and cultural factors as they affect management practices 
in the world. 



Journalism II. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: J 101. 

The basic principles of journalism and the organizational patterns of 
the mass media. The gathering of journalistic stories and the writing 
of general, simple, complex, and feature stories. 

J^C\'\ News Writing and Reporting. 
^'-' ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: J 101, E 113. 

The elements of news, the style and the structure of news stories, 
news gathering methods, copyreading, and editing. Practical experience 
in reporting, writing, and editing. 

JOr^O Atl^^nced News Writing and Reporting. 
^\J^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: J 201. 

Intensive practice in news writing and reporting. 



J 599 



Independent Study. 

Credit, 1-3 hours per semester. 

Prerequisites; Consent of faculty member and chairman of department. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member to 
explore an area of interest to him. This course must be initiated by 
the student. 



IB 549 



International Business Policy. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites; IB 313, Fl 325, IB 321, and IVIG 415, 
Identification and relation of the elements involved in the dynamics of 
a company and its international environment. Examination of the total 
international business situation, determination of the strengths and 
weaknesses of a firm's strategy and the development of alternate 
strategies to fulfill the particular firm's goals. Instruction shall be 
given through analysis of published strategy cases, following the 
Harvard case method approach. 



MANAGEMENT SCIENCE Roger Millen, Chairman 



IV/ir^ 1 '^P^ Management and Organization. 
I"'v3 I ^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The business organization, stressing the conceptual foundations of 
business. Ethical and behavioral issues in organizing. The authority, 
responsibility, and accountability in organization and management which 
underlie businesses of every legal torn]. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



123 



|V/ix-» 00 1 Industrial Relations. 
•"•'>J ^O I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing. 

The industrial relations and personnel management systems of the 
modern work organization are surveyed from an interdisciplinary per- 
spective. The use of an integrated behavioral, quantitative and systems 
approach permits an applied synthesis of the various aggregate man- 
power management systems including: manpower planning, forecasting 
and information; labor marketing; selection and placement; training 
and development; compensation; leadership; government-employer re- 
lations; and labor-management relations. 



IVIG455 



Organizational Effectiveness. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: MG 350, MG 324. 

Examination of the current practices used in the identification and 
development of effective managers. The problems of the organizational 
environment in which the manager operates are identified; approaches 
used to alleviate these problems and develop organizational and man- 
agerial effectiveness are studied. 



KJf^ '^17 ^'"^" Business Management. 
•"•''^ •^ ' ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Junior Standing. 

This course is designed to enable the student who is considering a 
career of self-employment to examine realistically some of the 
characteristics, opportunities, risk-taking and decision making in new 
business, new enterprises or self-employment ventures. 



MG489 



Internship. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: Senior Standing and permission of the Department 

Chairman. 

This program provides monitored field experience with business and 

industry subject to academic guidance and review. 



IV1G324 



Development of Management Thought. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MG 125. 

The study of the works of pioneers in management and organization 
theory in order to develop a historical perspective of management 
thought. Analysis of research in the field and its applicability to mod- 
ern management practices. 



TU\f^ C^ 1 O Managerial Economics. 
lYIVJ sJ IKJ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Senior standing and EC 134 and Fl 113. 
Integrates principles and concepts from the several business and 
economic fields to exemplify decision processes and strategies 
applicable to the management of the individual firm. 



MG350 



Advanced Management. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MG 125. 

This course is designed to reinforce the practices and principles of 
management which the student has been exposed to in management 
and organization. It also serves as a basis for applying management 
practices to the functional areas. As an intermediate course, it will 
require the student to pursue current research and readings dealing 
with advanced management planning, organization, staffing, direction 
and control. 



MG512 



Seminar. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

A rigorous examination of competing concepts of the role of business 
in society. A capstone, integrative course relating the firm to its 
environment. Issues arising from aggregate social, political, legal, and 
economic factors are stressed. 



ivii^ AAQ Independent Study. 
'"•vJ *+*+S7 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Independent study to be performed in a project of interest to the 
student and under direction of a faculty member to be designated by 
the department chairman. Project, student, and faculty director must 
be approved by both the department chairman and the Dean of the 
Business School. 



Rii^ CIC Reading Seminar in Management. 
'▼'v3 Zj I sJ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: MG 324, MG 350, MG 455. 

The course shall familiarize the students with contemporary publica- 
tions and the findings of research studies reports. The focus of in- 
struction will be to analyse, interpret, and determine the impact of 
these publications and research findings on the theory and practice of 
management. 



124 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



MG550 



Business Policy. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: MG 324, IVIG 350. MG 510. 

The complexities of dynamic enterprise and the development of an 
analytical framework for the identification and relationship of the 
numerous elements involved in sensing an entire company and its en- 
vironment. Examination of the total business situation and determina- 
tion of the strengths and weaknesses of particular firms' strategies 
will lead students to the development of alternate strategies to assure 
fulfillment of the firms' goals. 



MARKETING Shiv Sawhney, Chairman 



N/il^ 1 O^ Principles of Marketing. 
IVIIN. I KJiJ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The fundamental functions of marketing involving the basic principles 
of the flow of goods and services from producer to consumer. Mar- 
keting methods, policies, and problems of the manufacturer, whole- 
saler, and retailer are reviewed through analysis of channels of dis- 
tribution, price policies, competition, and market information. 

\A\^ 1 07 Advertising and Promotion. 
IVirv I KJ / Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MK 105 or equivalent. 

The design, management, and evaluation of the various communica- 
tions programs involved in marketing and public relations. 

IV^ IX' O/^O Physical Distribution Management. 
IVirs. ^Vw/O Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; MK 105. 

Planning organization, management, and operation of logistic systems, 
with emphasis on the effective use of transportation to meet the 
objectives of a business. 

ly^ix ^^Q Procurement Management. 
IVIIX ^^<-> Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MK 105. 

A course designed to include the examination of the functions of 
materials supervision and management as well as a study of the pur- 
chasing process, 

\Al^ ■^O^ Industrial Marketing. 

IVIIX OW^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MK 105. 

Practices and policies in the distribution of industrial goods, including 
purchasing practices, market analysis, channels of distribution, dis- 
tribution and pricing policies, competitive practices, and operating 
costs. 



lyyii^ Q 1 C^ Marketing Management. 
IViiN. O I ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MK 105. 

Policies, practices, and problems in the field of marketing manage- 
ment; product development, product planning for promotion; market 
investigation, quantitative and qualitative; pricing and price policies; 
planning the marketing effort; and control of marketing operations. 



MK316 



Sales Management. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MK 105. 

Problems and resulting policies encountered in the management of a 
sales organization. Qualifications and duties of the sales manager, 
departmental organization; recruiting, selecting, training, stimulating, 
supervising, compensating, and routing salesmen; and territories, 
quotas, expenses, promotions, and policies. 

KJIiy' 0.^0 Marketing Research. 
IVIrV O'-K^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: MK 105 and QA 216 

Research as a component of the marketing information system. Defini- 
tion of objectives, selection of appropriate research designs and survey 
techniques, sampling methods, analysis and interpretation of primary 
and secondary data, and management of the marketing research func- 
tion, including value analysis and budget considerations. 



MATHEMATICS Richard M. Stanley, Chairman 



All prerequisites for the following mathematics courses must be 
strictly observed unless waived by permission of the Mathematics 
Department. 



MOOl 



Mathematics Review I. 

No credit. Meets 3 hours per week. 

Required of both iay and evening students who do not show sufficient 
understanding of mathematics fundamentals, as determined by entrance 
examinations. Natural numbers, integers, rationals and irrationals, 
properties and operations in each, construction and solution of mathe- 
matical models using simple equations, and percentages. 

Ml /^E Introductory College Mathematics. 
' >-'«J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Introductory college mathematics for the liberal arts student that in- 
cludes a variety of mathematical ideas chosen to illustrate the nature 
and importance of mathematics in human culture. An inductive approach 
based on experimentation and discovery. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



125 



Ml r\Q Elementary College Algebra. 
' ^<J^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A review of the fundamental operations and an extensive study of 
functions, exponents, radicals, linear, and quadratic equations. Addi- 
tional topics include ratio, proportion, variation, progressions, and the 
binomial theorem. 



M 115 



PreCalculus Mathematics. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 109. 

Designed to offer the foundation needed for the study of calculus. 
Polynomials, algebraic functions, elementary point geometry, plane 
analytic trigonometry, and properties of exponential functions. 



Ml 1 fi Survey of Calculus. 
' ' ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 115. 

An intuitive approach to topics in functions, analytic geometry, differ- 
ential and integral calculus, and probability. Designed for an insight 
into, and appreciation of, the methods of analysis. 



M 115/117 



Calculus I. 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: U 109. 

A one-semester course meeting six hours per week, which includes 

topics from M 115 and M 117. 



M 117 



Calculus I. 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 115. 

The first-year college course for majors in mathematics, science, and 
engineering; and the basic prerequisite for all advanced mathematics. 
Introduces differential and integral calculus of functions of one vari- 
able, along with plane analytic geometry. 



Ml OO Algebraic Structures II. 
' ^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: U 121. 

A continuation of M 121 including an introduction to groups, rings, 

fields, and the real and complex number systems. 



M 127 



Finite Mathematics. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Basic discrete functions with numerous applications in the social 
sciences, elementary finite differences; topics from probability, 
matrices, and introduction to linear programming. 



Ml oo Elementary Statistics. 
' ^O Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: one previous course in college mathematics. 
Includes basic probability theory, random variables and their distri- 
butions, estimation and hypothesis testing, regression and correla- 
tion. Will emphasize an applied approach to statistical theory with 
applications ctiosen from many different fields of study. 



M 137 



Calculus Topics. 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Departmental permission. 

The theoretical material of the standard first year of calculus, includ- 
ing limits, chain rules, mean value theorems, and a discussion of the 
fundamental theorem of integral calculus. Upon successful completion, 
the student is qualified for M 203. 



M203 



Calculus III. 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 118. 

The calculus of multiple variables, covering third dimensional topics 
m analytics, linear algebra, and vector analysis, plus partial differentia- 
tion, multiple integration, infinite series, and indeterminate forms. 



M 118 



Calculus II. 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 117, 

Continuation of first-year calculus, including methods of integration, 
the fundamental integration theorem, differentiation and integration of 
transcendental functions, and varied applications. 



M^r\/\ Differential Equations. 
^•^^*-r Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 203. 

The solution of ordinary differential equations, including the use of 
Laplace transforms. Existence of solutions, series solutions, matrix 
methods, non-linear equations, and varied applications. 



Ml O 1 Algebraic Structures I. 

• ^ ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A first course in and an orientation to abstract mathematics: ele- 
mentary logic, sets, mappings, relations, operations, elementary group 
theory. Open to all freshmen and sophomores. 



Mpol Linear Algebra. 
^''^ ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 203. 

Linear spaces and systems, matrices, linear transformations, quadratic 

forms, eigenspaces, and other topics. 



126 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



M '^01 Linear Analysis. 

iTi *J\J I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Pretequisites: M 204 and M 231. 

Linear vector spaces, infinite series, transformations, generalized 

Fourier series, solutions of partial differential equations. 

IV/I QO*^ Adi/anced Calculus I. 
ITI *J\y<j Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; M 204. 

A survey course in applied mathematics. Vector Calculus: line and 
surface integrals, integral theorems of Green and Stokes, and the 
divergence theorem. Complex variables: elementary functions, Cauchy- 
Riemann equations, integration, Cauchy integral theorem, infinite 
series, calculus of residues, and conformal mapping. An introduction 
to Cartesian tensors. 

M '^O^ Advanced Calculus II. 
iTi ^^v^** Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 204. 

Topics from applied mathematics include: Fourier series, orthogonal 
functions, Bessel functions, Legendre polynomials, Laplace and Fourier 
transforms, product solutions of partial differential equations and 
boundary value problems. 

M '^O^ Series Solutions. 

ivi <^\J^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 204, 

Series solutions of ordinary differential equations, including the hyper- 
geometric type, Fourier analysis, introduction to perturbation methods 
and successive approximation solutions of non-linear differential 

equations. 

M '^OQ Advanced Differential Equations. 
!▼! *JV-»C7 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 204. 

Theoretical analysis and applications of nonlinear differential equations. 
Phase plane and space, perturbation theory and techniques, series and 
related methods, stability theory and techniques, and relaxation phe- 
nomena, 

M "^Pl Modern Algebra I. 

''' ^^^- ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 121 and M 231. 

Groups, rings, integral domains, fields, polynomials. 

|V^ *^Pf^ Number Theory. 

'^' *-'^-*^ Credit. 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 121. 

Topics are selected from the following: mathematical induction, 
Euclidean algorithm, integers, number theoretic functions, Euler-Fermat 
theorems, congruence, quadratic residues, and Peano axioms. 



M 338-339 Numerical Analysis I and II. 

D 7 TT -,„. ^^^'^'^' 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 204 and IE 102. 

Approximatiori and error evaluation. Finite differences approximation 
by polynomia and orthogonal series, solutions of ordinary differential 
equa ions, solutions of elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic partial differ- 
ential equations, interpolation, and basic integral equation solutions 



M 34 1 S^'5 ^"t" Ordered Structures. 
iTi ^^ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 121. 

Axiomatic set theory based on the Zermelo-Fraenkel theory algebra 
of sets, relations and functions, finite and infinite sets, order axiom 
of choice and its equivalents 



M "^A.*^ Projective Geometry. 
iri ^«-fO Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 121 and M 231. 

Projective transformations, fixed points, invariants, cross-ratio conies 

Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries. 



1^ *^45^ Tensor Analysis. 

• ^^""^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 204 and IV1231. 

The properties of vectors and tensors in Cartesian and in general 
curvilinear coordinate systems. Topics covered include- inviriance 
properties, transformation lav»s, calculus of tensors, covariant differ- 
entiation surface theory. Applications are considered in areas such as 
rigid body dynamics, elasticity, fluid mechanics, electricity and mag- 
netism, and geometry. ' ^ 



M 371 Probability Theory. 

iTi *^y 1 Credit, 3 semester hours 

Prerequisite: M 203. 

Axiomatic study of probability: sample spaces, combinatorial analysis 
independence and dependence, random variables, distribution functions' 
moment generating functions, central limit theorem 



M 3^1 ''^^' Analysis I. 

iTi Kj\j 1 Credit, 3 semester hours 

Prerequisites: M 121 and M 203. 

Foundations of analysis: sets and functions, real and complex number 
systems; limits, convergence and continuity, sequences and infinite 
series, differentiation. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



127 



'"• ^ ' ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 381. 

Continuation of M 381 including Riemann-Stieitjes integration theory 

and an introduction to measure theory and the Lebesgue integral. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Constantme C. Lambrakis, Chairman 



KA ^OO Modern Algebra II. 

'"' *+^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; M 321. 

Continuation of M 321 including topics such as: vector spaces, modules, 

commutative ring theory, Galois theory. 

M^oo Complex Variables. 
^■^*^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 381. 

For mathematics, science, and engineering students. 
Review of elementary functions and Euler forms; plus holomorphic 
functions, Laurent series, singularities, calculus of residues, contour 
integration, maximum modulus theorem, bilinear and inverse trans- 
formations, conformal mapping, and analytic continuation. 

MA A 1 Topology. 
^^ ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IVI 381. 

Topics selected from the following: Hausdorff neighborhood relations, 
derived, open and closed sets, closure, topological space, bases, 
homeomorphisms, relative topology, product spaces, separation axioms, 
metric spaces, connectedness and compactness. 



M472 



Mathematical Statistics. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 371. 

Elements of the theory of point estimation, maximum likelihood esti- 
mates, theory of testing hypotheses, power of a test, confidence, inter- 
vals, linear regression, experimental design and analysis of variance, 
correlation, and non-parametric tests. 



MAQ'] Departmental Seminar. 
^^ ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Independent study of some topic or topics approved by the Chairman 
of the department. This work is done under the supervision of a faculty 
member. A paper and/or a seminar talk may be required. 

KM CQQ Independent Study. 

IVI sJ^ZP Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with a 
maximum of 12. 

Prerequisite: Consent of faculty member and chairman of department. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest. This course must be initiated by the 
student. 



MF" 1 O 1 Engineering Graphics, 

u- l\J I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

An introduction to the principles and techniques of graphical com- 
munication. Fundamentals of orthographic projections; sections; applied 
geometry; auxiliary views; analysis of point, line, and plane relation- 
ships: detail and assembly drawing of simple machine parts. 

MP" 1 /^O Engineering Drawing and Design. 
•^ ' *-'^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: ME 101. 

For technical students and draftsmen, covering layout of assembly 
drawings; detailing of their parts, properly dimensioned, for inter- 
changeable manufacture; use of A S A tables of metal fits for machine 
parts; use of threads and fasteners with the use of tolerances and 
limits. 



ME 124 



Mechanical Processes. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Mill and manufacturing processes. The casting of metals, pattern 
making, and mold preparing. Fabricating, metal cutting, and welding. 
Demonstrations, laboratory, and inspection trips to local manufacturing 
plants. 

MP Or\A Dynamics. 
"" ^mX^^t Cr6dit 3 sBmcstsr hours 

Prerequisites: CE 201, and m' 118 or M 137 (M 118 or M 137 may be 
taken concurrently). 

Kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies with emphasis 
on two-dimensional problems. Vector representation of motion in 
rectangular, polar, and natural coordinates. Impulse-momentum and 
work-energy theorems. Rigid bodies in translation, rotation and general 
plane motion. 

MC" OO 1 Thermodynamics I. 
^ OW I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 118 or M 137. 

Classical thermodynamics treatment of first and second laws. Thermal 
and caloric equations of state. Closed and open systems, and steady 
flow processes. Absolute temperature, entropy, combined first and 
second laws. Introduction to statistical thermodynamics: particle 
distributions, statistical concept of entropy, and relation to macro- 
scopic properties. 



128 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



MP" 0(^0 Thermodynamics II. 
^ OVy^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: ME 301, and M 203 (M 203 may be tal^en concurrently). 
Extensions and applications of first and second laws: availability, com- 
bustion processes, phase and chemical equilibrium, ideal gas mixtures. 
Maxwell's relations. Steam power and refrigeration cycles. Internal 
combustion engine and gas turbine cycles. Irreversible tfiermodynamics. 



ME 307 



Mechanics of Materials II. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CE 202. 

Elastic and plastic behavior of structural elements such as beams, 
columns, and shafts under direct and combined loading. Ultimate 
strength design, theory of failure, composite member design, and an 
introduction to statically indeterminate structures. 



ME311 



Machine Elements. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CE 202. 

Analysis and design of machine elements to meet specified operating 

conditions. Stresses, deformations, and other factors in design of 

machine parts. Application to machine elements such as joints, shafts, 

gears, couplings, brakes, clutches, and flexible power-transmitting 

elements 

MP" O 1 O Mechanical Design. 
L— 'J I ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: ME 307 or instructor's consent. 

Continuation of Machine Elements. Design projects selected individual- 
ly developed by the student. 

IV^P" O 1 C^ Mechanical Engineering Laboratory No. 1. 
'^'^ •J I *J Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CE 202, ME 204. 

Students conduct selected tests in the fields of mechanics of materials 
and vibrations. Emphasis placed on organization of the experiment, 
measurement techniques, sources of error, and organization of the 
report. Students are required to design, conduct, and present one ex- 
periment of their own. 

Note: Part-time students are charged for a standard 3 semester hour 
course. 



ME 321 



Fluid Mechanics. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: ME 204, and M 203. 

Fluid kinematics: continuity equation, vector operations. Momentum 
equation for frictionless flow: Bernoulli equation with applications. 
Irrofational flow: velocity potential, Laplace's equation, dynamic pres- 
sure and lift. Stream function for incompressible flows. Rotational 
flows: vorticity, circulation, lift, and drag. Integral momentum analysis. 
Navier Stokes equation: stress tensor, Newtonian fluid. Boundary layer 
approximations. 



K^P" *^^^ Introduction to' Gas Dynamics. 
IVItZ. >^^.£. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: ME 302 and ME 321 (ME 321 may be taken concurrently). 
Compressible fluid flow with emphasis on one-dimensional ducted 
steady flows with heat transfer, frictional effects, shock waves, and 
combined effects. Introductory considerations of two and three 
dimensional flows. Occasional demonstrations will accompany the 
lectures. 

IV/ip" 00= Tool Design 

lYiC »J>J*J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CE 201 and ME 124 (ME 124 may be taken concurrently). 
Basic techniques of tool design, methods, analysis, drill jig design, 
tolerances and allowances, cutting tools, die design, gauges, and 
fixtures. 



ME 336 



ME 343 



ME 344 



Tool Engineering. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: ME 335 or Instructor's Consent. 

A continuation of ME 335 with emphasis on economics, estimating, and 
process planning. Students design projects requiring the complete plan- 
ning and designing necessary to manufacture machine parts. 

Mechanisms. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: ME 204. 

Graphical and analytical methods for determining displacements, 
velocities, and accelerations of machine components. Application to 
simple mechanisms such as linkages, cams, gears. 

Mechanics of Vibration. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: ME 204. 

The mathematical relationships necessary for the solution of problems 
involving the vibration of lumped and continuous systems; damping; 
free and forced motion; resonance; isolation; energy methods; bal- 
ancing; single, two and multiple degrees of freedom; vibration measure- 
ment. 

MP" ^/^ 1 Mechanical Systems Analysis. 
•— *+^-' ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: ME 204, M 204. 

Dynamical systems and their characteristics. Analogy of electrical, 
mechanical, and other systems. Mixed systems — Dimensional Analysis — 
Design considerations. 

MP" A(^*^ Introduction to Flight Propulsion. 
^ '-rV-'O Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: ME 322 and Instructor's consent. 
A senior course designed for those students who intend to work or 
pursue further studies in the aerospace field. Among the topics covered 
are: Detonation and deflagration, introductory one-dimensional non- 
steady gas flows, basic concepts of turbo-machinery, and survey of the 
contemporary propulsive devices. Shock tubes, supersonic wind tunnel, 
and flame propagation demonstrations will accompany the lectures. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



129 



ME 404 



ME405 



Heat and Mass Transfer. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: ME 302, ME 321. and some knowledge of differential 
equations (ME 321 may be taken concurrently). 
Conduction in solids, solution of multi-dimensional conduction prob- 
lems, unsteady conduction, radiation, boundary layer, and convection. 
Introduction to mass transfer. The lectures will Include occasional 
demonstrations of convection, radiation, heat exchangers. 

Advanced Mechanical Design. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: ME 321. 

Selected and advanced topics related to the design of machine ele- 
ments such as hydrodynamic theory of lubrication and principles of 
hydraulic machines with application to hydraulic couplings. 

MP" ^f\C^ Turbomachinery. 
*^ *+v-/\_> Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: ME 302 and ME 321. 

Basic Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Dimensional analysis. Spe- 
cific speed. Classification of turbomachlnes. Cavitation. Losses. Defini- 
tions of efficiency. Theories of turbomachlnes. Design considerations 
for stator blades and rotor blades. Computer aided design 

MP" ^r\Q Advanced Dynamics. 
^ *+V-'C3 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: ME 204, and M 204. 

Plane and spatial motion of particles and rigid bodies, Inertia tensor, 
relative motion, gyroscopes, central force motion, Lagrangian and 
Hamiltonian Methods. 

Introduction to Nuclear Engineering I & II. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 204. 

The fundamental scientific and engineering principles of nuclear re- 
actor systems. Reactor design and behavior related to fission process, 
its associated radiations and engineering principles. 

N^P" ^1 R Mechanical Engineering Laboratory No. 2. 
IVIE. «+ I *j Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: ME 302, ME 321, and ME 404. 

A survey of experiments and laboratory Investigations covering the 

areas of fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, heat transfer, and gas 

dynamics. 

Note: Part-time students are charged for a standard 3-semester-hour 

course. 



ME 410-411 



ME 51 2 



Senior Seminar. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Open to Seniors with Chairman's approval. 

An Independent design, theoretical analysis, or laboratory investiga- 
tion as chosen by the student and approved by the Chairman of the 
department. The work is performed by the student with frequent 
critiques by the responsible faculty member. 



MATERIALS ENGINEERING 

Richard J. Greet, Coordinator 



Jijl~r POO Engineering Materials. SPRING TERM 

'^' ' ^vy^-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A study of the properties of the principal engineering materials of 
modern technology: Steels and non-ferrous alloys and their heat 
treatment, concrete, wood, ceramics, and plastics. Gives engineers 
sufficient background to aid them In selecting materials and setting 
specifications. 



MT219 



Physical Metallurgy. FALL TERM 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 105. 

Introduction to the relationships between atomic structure and macro- 
scopic properties such as mechanical strength and ductility. Atomic 
bonding, crystallography, phase equilibrium and phase transforma- 
tions are among the topics considered. 



MT220 



Electronic Materials. SPRING TERM 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PH 205. 

Study of transport and rearrangement of charge to determine electric 
and magnetic properties of solids. Semiconductors, superconductors, 
and magnetic materials are among the topics considered. 

MX '^Ol Welding Metallurgy. 
lYI I ^\J I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MT219. 

Study of welding and brazing procedures of ferrous and non-ferrous 

alloys, with consideration of macro and microstructures of welded 

members. 



MT OO^ Polymeric Materials. 
"' ' OV-/^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 105. 

Chemistry and physical properties of rubber and plastic materials. 
Consideration of both fundamental principles and engineering appli- 
cations. 



K/l"r" OO^ Mechanical Behavior of Materials. SPRING TERM 
"* ■ »->v-'*-l' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MT 219. 

Detailed study of elastic and plastic deformation of materials at room 
temperature and elevated temperatures. Dislocation theory and micro- 
plasticity models considered. 



130 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



IV^T *aOQ Materials Laboratory: Metallography. 
lYI I k:^\J^ Cgjj, 11/2 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: iVIT219. 

Laboratory preparation of both ferrous and non-ferrous samples for 
microscopic investigation, including photomicroscopy with metallo- 
graph microscope. 



N^~p '3 1 O Materials Laboratory: Heat Treatment. 
lYI I >^ l\J Cejjt 11/2 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MT219. 

Laboratory documentation of the effects of heat treatment in annealing 

and hardening both ferrous and non-ferrous materials. 



K/IT 00^ Nuclear Metallurgy. 

'"' ' *3^*-r Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MT 219. 

Consideration of nuclear reactors, the production and fabrication of 
metals and alloys used as reactor components, non-destructive test- 
ing, and radiation damage of materials. 



IV^T KOO Research Project. 

IVl i *J^U\J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: MT331, MT 342, plus senior status. 
An independent design, theoretical analysis, or laboratory investiga- 
tion, chosen by the student and approved by the Chairman of the 
Department. The work is performed by the student with frequent 
critiques by a faculty member. 



I^T KQQ Independent Study. 

' ' *-^^^ Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with a 
maximum of 12. 

Prerequisites: Consent of faculty supervisor and approval of Depart- 
ment Chairman. 

Independent study provides an opportunity for the student to explore 
an area of special interest, under faculty supervision. The project 
must be initiated by the student, have the consent of the faculty 
director and the approval of the Department Chairman. 



MT331 



Non-ferrous Metallurgy. FALL TERM 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MT219. 

The physical metallurgy of aluminum, copper, magnesium, and other 
non-ferrous metals. Alloying, fabrication, and consideration of materials 
properties which make non-ferrous metals competitive with steels. 



PHILOSOPHY 

John Collinson, Chairman 



MT342 



steels and Their Heat Treatment. FALL TERM 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MT219. 

Fundamentals of ferrous physical metallurgy such as iron-carbon 
phase diagram, transformation diagrams, hardenability, and the effects 
of alloying elements. Heat treating discussed in terms of resulting 
microstructures and physical properties. 



MT400 



Materials Reactions. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MT 219. 

Consideration of chemical reactions in the liquid and solid state of 
importance to the field of materials engineering. Topics to include 
extractive metallurgy, internal oxidation, surface treatment, and 
recycling of secondary materials. 



PI 111 Introduction to Problems of Philosophy. 

r I— I I I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Man's place in the universe, how we discover truth, the nature of 
beauty and the good, the basis of moral choices. 



ni 1 1 '3 History of Philosophy through the Renaissance. 
r^l_ I I O Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Chronological introduction to problems of philosophy. Pre-Socratics, 
Plato, Aristotle, Medieval and Renaissance philosophers. 



IV^T ^r\ 1 Materials Analysis. 

lYl I *-¥\J I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 204 (may be taken concurrently), MT 219. 
Mathematical treatment of selected topics of diffusion, phase trans- 
formations, and mechanical and electrical properties of materials. 



PI 11^ History of Modern Philosophy. 
"•— ' ' ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Chronological introduction to problems of philosophy. Seventeenth Cen- 
tury to the present, including Descartes, Hume, Hegel, Nietzsche, and 
contemporary philosophers. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



131 



PI 1 ^4 '■"^''^ ^"'' Scientific Metliod. 
' •— ' ^*+ Credit, 3 semester liours. 

Introduces the student to deduction, warranted induction, and scien- 
tific description. 



PL 21 3-21 4 



Contemporary Issues In Philosophy. 
Credit, 3-6 semester hours. 

Content varies with the interest of the instructor and the students. 
Current philosophical thinking in such areas as natural science, social 
science, metaphysics, religion, aesthetics, theory of knowledge, lan- 
guage, existentialism, ethics, and positivism. 



PI *^*^''^ Ethics in a Changing Society. 
' L- ^^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PL 111 or 113. 

The major ethical systems in the framework of contemporary society. 
Ethical norms which point to goals of life and their relation to the 
issues in science, business, the professions, and other human activities. 



PI Of?0 Development of Jewish Thought I. 
' •— ^^-'v-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A survey of the development of Jewish thinking and philosophy dur- 
ing the ancient and medieval periods. Among the areas covered 
will be the Patriarchal period, early religion and law, the Prophets, 
the Hellenistic period, Talmudic Judaism, the Kabbalah and Medieval 
Judaism. 



PL 261 

A survey of the 
philosophy. Jewish 
Hassidic movement, 



Development of Jewish Thought II. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

modern and contemporary Jewish thinking and 
mysticism, the pseudo-messianic movements, the 
the Reform movement and Zionism will be stressed. 



PL 322 



Analysis and Criticism of the Arts. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: At least 3 semester hours of Philosophy. 

The language used to talk about works of art. Form, content, 

sion, values, the ontological status of the art object. 



expres- 



PI PPC^ Symbolic Logic. 

' *— ^^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PL 124 or M 121. 

Formal deductive systems, including the propositional calculus, the 
calculus of functions, independence of axioms, primitive symbols, inter- 
pretation, paradoxes, theory of types, Goedel's theorem. 



PI O^O Philosophy of Science. 
' ^ ^*+V-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PL 111. 

A study of the nature of scientific method, the logic of scientific ex- 
planation and theory construction, philosophical problems of selected 
sciences, questions peculiar to the social sciences. 



PL 599 



Independent Study. 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with 
a maximum of 12. 

Prerequisite: Consent of faculty member and dean of Arts and Sciences. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be initiated 
bv the student. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Donald Wynschenk, Chairman 



PI OC^O Philosophy of Religion. 
' ^- ^^^<J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PL 111. 

An examination of some philosophical notions used in religious dis- 
course; meaning, truth, fact, being, logic. 



PL 252 



Existentialism. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

From its origin in the 19th century to contemporary manifestations. 
Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Kafka, Sartre, R. D. Laing, and 
others. 



pp- 1 OO '■'"'"2 "'til Leisure. 
~^ " ^^J^^J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Three distinct units designed to give the student a strong foundation 
of knowledge and skills for dealing with the abundance of leisure time 
and sedentary life style of today's society. Personal aspects of health- 
ful living, first aid skill and technique, and an indepth study of leisure 
time activities such as tennis, sailing, golf, bicycling, aquatics, skating, 
bowling and racquet games including an examination of their his- 
torical, mechanical, physiological, and sociological implications are 
offered. A separate grade is given for each one credit section and 
completion of the three credit course satisfies degree requirements for 
physical education. 



132 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



PE 111-112 



Physical Education (Co-ed). 

No credit, required for graduation. 

Each section emphasizes a different lifetime or carry-over sport de- 
signed to give the student the experience of developing ability and 
skill in a physical activity which will help meet the demands of a 
future characterized by an abundance of leisure time. Activities such 
as tennis, golf, volleyball, paddleball, handball, bowling, skating, 
swimming, sailing, skiing, softball, badminton and bicycling are taught 
in a recreational atmosphere created to encourage the student to con- 
tinue and further develop his interest and skill through involvement 
m intramurals and community recreation programs of a private or 
commercial nature. Students may register for as many sections or se- 
mesters of these courses as their interests warrant. 



PE 113-114 



Physical Education (Women). 
No credit. 

Leisure-time activities such as those offered in the co-educational sec- 
tions (PE 111-112) taught with similar aims and objectives for women 
students. May be taken to satisfy graduation requirements. 



PE 221-222 



Personal Health. 
No credit. 

Personal aspects of healthful living including units on mental health: 
venereal disease, tobacco, alcohol abuse, reproduction and contra- 
ception, marriage and family life, nutrition and the multifarious bene- 
fits of daily physical activity. Student is expected to do some re- 
search on modern health problems as well as an independent study 
on a related subject area. This course may be taken in lieu of PE 
111-112 or PE 113-114 and satisfies degree requirements for physical 
education. 



PHYSICS Kee W. Chun, Chairman 



PI— I 1 OO Introductory Physics. 

''> I WV-/ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course is intended primarily for liberal arts and business students 

who wish to obtain a broad, non-mathematical understanding of physics. 

Emphasis is placed on the essential ideas of physics, their application 

to our everyday environment, and their impact on society. 



PH 103-104 



General Physics. 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Cannot be taken for credit by students majoring in chemistry, physics, 
or engineering. 

Basic concepts of classical and modern physics, such as fundameiltal 
laws and phenomena of mechanics, electricity, magnetism, heat, and 
optics. Conservation principles, relativity and quantum theory, atomic, 
nuclear, and solid state physics, geophysics, astrophysics, biophysics. 



DLJ 1 r\^ 1 C\f^ General Physics Laboratory. 
i-n I y^^ I y^\j q^jjj, 2 semester hours. 

May be elected concurrently with PH 103-104. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00 per semester. 



PH 140 



Radioactivity Laboratory Technique. 
Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: One semester of laboratory science. 
Provides a practical working knowledge of radioactive techniques to - 
students in any branch of science, engineering or forensics, or to any- 
one wishing knowledge of the role of nuclear technology today. Experi- 
ments may be completed in biology, chemistry, engineering, forensics 
or physics, according to the interest of the student. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

rjLJ 1 UZr\ Mechanics, Heat, and Waves W/Lab. 
* t' I >J^<J Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 117 or Instructor's Consent (M 117 may be taken con- 
currently.) 

Introductory course for science and engineering majors. Kinematics, 
Newton's laws, conservation principles for momentum, energy, and 
angular momentum. Thermal physics. Basic properties of waves, simple 
harmonic motion, superposition principle, interference phenomenas, 
and sound. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

pi_i O/^C^ Electromagnetism and Optics W/Lab. 
~rn ^KJsJ Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: PH 150 and M 118 (M 118 may be taken concurrently). 
Basic concepts of electricity and magnetism; Coulomb's law, electric 
field and potential. Gauss's law. Ohm's law, Kirchoff's rules, capaci- 
tance, magnetic field. Ampere's law, Faraday's law of induction. Max- 
well's equations, electromagnetic waves. Fundamentals of optics; light, 
laws of reflection and refraction, interference and diffraction phenom- 
enas, polarization, gratings, lenses and optical instruments, quantum 
optics. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00 

pi_| Oil Modern Physics 

' ri ^■' ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: PH 205 or PH 104. 

Modern physics fundamentals. Twentieth-century developments in the 
theory of relativity and the quantum theory. Atomic, nuclear, solid 
state, and elementary particle physics. 

pi_| ^"yf) Thermal Physics. 

til ^ / KJ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: PH 150 or PH 103. 

Laws of thermodynamics, entropy, applications to physical, chemical 
systems and thermal machines; elementary kinetic theory of gases; 
basic concepts of classical and quantum statistics. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



133 



OLJ O/^l Analytical Mechanics. 
' ■■ >:j\J I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 204, PH 150, or Instructor's consent. 
Intermediate analytical mechanics. Statics ari? dynamics of particles 
and rigid bodies with emphasis on the theory of motion under central 
forces and on the use of the generalized coordinates; introduction to 
an elementary Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalism; small vibrations. 



PH340 



Lasers. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PH 205 or Instructor's consent. 

Laser theory, construction and application to latest engineering and 

scientific uses. 



PH '^Ckl intermediate Electricity and Magnetism. 
~ri >:j*J I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: PH 205 and M 204. 

Electric held, potential, Gauss Law, dipoles, Poisson, and Laplace 

equations, dielectric theory, steady magnetic fields, electromagnetic 

induction, magnetic properties of matter. Maxwell's equations, L-C-R 

circuits, A.C. circLit analysis, vacuum tube and transistor circuit 

theory. 



pi_| OfSI Modern Optics. 

~Ii t^sJ 1 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PH 205. 

Solid state spectroscopy from the point of view of the research 
physicist and chemist. Modern optical devices including television 
pick-up tubes, electro- and injection-luminescent devices, image ampli- 
fiers, lasers and holography, fiber-optics, opto-electronics for com- 
puters. 



PH373 



Advanced Laboratory. 
Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PH 211. 

Selected experiments in atomic and nuclear physics including nuclear 
radiation and decay, quantization of charge and light energy, and 
nuclear magnetic resonance. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



PH400 



statistical Mechanics. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Instructor's consent. 

An introductory course in classical and quantum statistical mechanics. 
The canonical ensemble; Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein, and Fermi- 
Dirac statistics and their applications; statistical interpretation of 
thermodynamics; transport processes. 



pi_| Af)'\ Atomic Physics. 

r n ^*\J I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PH 211. 

Structure and interactions of atomic systems including Schrodinger's 
equation, atomic bonding, scattering and mean free path, radiative 
transitions, and laser theory. 



PH404 



Senior Project. 

Credit, 0-6 semester hours. 

Open only to senior Physics Majors. Individual projects in experi- 
mental or theoretical physics to be carried out under direct super- 
vision of a faculty advisor. 



P|_i A.(~\f^ Solid State Physics. 

• rl *-*\J\J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PH 211. 

Elementary principles of the electrical and physical behavior of solids 
as applied to semiconductor, metallurgy, and magnetically activated 
solid state devices. 



PH415 



Nuclear Physics. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PH 211 or Instructor's consent. 

Elementary nuclear physics. Nuclear structure, natural radioactivity, 
induced radioactivity, nuclear forces, and reactions, fission and fusion, 
reactors, and topics of special interest. 

P|_i ^Kl Elementary Quantum Mechanics. 
• rl **iJ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PH 211 or Instructor's consent. 

An elementary treatment of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. 
Schrodinger's equation with its applications to atomic and nuclear 
structure; collision theory; radiation; introductory perturbation theory. 

PLJ A'7(^ Theory of Relativity. 

r n •+/V-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Instructor's consent. 

Introductory course on Einstein's theory of Relativity. Special theory of 

relativity including the Lorentz Transformation, Minkowsky geometry, 

relativistic mechanics, and electromagnetism. General theory of relativity 

including principle of equivalence, Einstein's theory of gravitation, 

graviton. 



PH599 



Independent Study. 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with a 

maximum of 12. 

Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of department. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be initiated by 
the student. 



134 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Caroline A. Dinegar, Chairman 
Joshua H. Sandman, Acting Chairman 



PS 21 6 



Urban Government and Politics. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The organizational and administrative government at the municipal 
level with special emphasis upon the problems of modern urban 
America in relation to social and political development. 



PS 121 



American Government and Politics. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A basic study of the American political system stressing American 
political culture, the constitutional foundations of American govern- 
ment, public opinion and political participation, political parties and 
pressure groups, the legislature, the presidency, the judicial system, 
individual liberties and foreign policy making. 



PS 122 



state and Local Government and Politics. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The politics of state and local government in the United States. 
Emphasis on the problems of cities, revenue sharing, community power 
structures, welfare, public safety, the state political party, big-city 
political machines, interest groups, state legislatures, the governor, 
the mayor, courts and judicial reform. 



PS 164 



Politics of the Third World. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
An examination of the emerging and new third world states with 
emphasis upon the problems of national integration, political unity 
traditionalism, nationalism, imperialism, colonialism, religious and cul- 
tural beliefs, social structures, local political structures, regionalism 
and federalism, and political leadership. 



PS 201-202 



Women and the Political Process. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PS 121 or permission of the Instructor. 

The political process in relation to the economic, social, cultural and 

psychological aspect of women. Structured to meet the contemporary 

social and political introspection concerning women in an egalitarian 

society. 

DC OO*^ American Political Thought. 
• *-^ ^■*-'*^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A study of the major themes in American thought. Among the areas 
stressed will be pre-revolutionary and revolutionary political thinking 
the Jefferson-Hamilton struggle, classical conservatism and liberalism, 
Jacksonian Democracy, civil disobedience, conflicting political think 
Ing during the Civil War, social Darwinism and economic indivdualism 
the progressive movement, the New Deal, pluralism, contemporary liber' 
alism and conservatism and protest movements. 



DC OOO United States Foreign Policy. 
' ^ ^i^i^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A quantitative and qualitative examination of the foreign policy 
process for the United States. The strategy and tactics of a super- 
power in the twentieth century and the determinants Involved In the 
foreign policy and military policy areas. 



PS 232 



The Politics of the First Amendment. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PS 121. 

This course will examine the political implications of First Amendment 
freedoms (speech, press, religion) and how the Supreme Court has 
continually updated and expanded the scope and meaning of the First 
Amendment to changing political and social conditions. Such current 
First Amendment problems as government aid to parochial schools, 
newsman's privileges and the right to print state secrets will be dis- 
cussed. 



PS 241 



International Relations. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. (Formerly PS 221) 

Forces and structures operating at the international level in the 
modern nation state system: the foreign policy process and the 
decision-making process, the impact on traditional interstate behavior 
of the decolonization process, and the economic and political develop- 
ments since World War II. 



DC 0^*3 International Law and Organization. 

• "^^ ^*+0 Credit, 3 semester hours. (Formerly PS 223) 

Prerequisite: PS 241. 

The traditional as well as modern approach to international law and 
organization; major emphasis on the contribution of law and organi- 
zation to the establishment of a world rule of law and world peace. 
The League of Nations system and the United Nations system are 
analyzed. 



DC Pf^l Modern Political Analysis. (Formerly PS 120) 
' "-^ ^it/ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A basic introduction to the new approaches of modern political 
analysis. Personality and Politics, Political Socialization, Group 
Theory, Decision Making, Systems Analysis and Political Violence will 
be among the areas covered. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



135 



PS 281 



Comparative Political Systems: East Asia. 
Credit 3 semester hours. (Formerly PS 110) 

The traditional and modern political and social structures of China, 
Japan and Korea as well as the functioning of the political system 
within each country. 



PS 282 



Comparative Political Systems: Europe. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The political characteristics of European nations. Emphasis will be 
given to governmental, political, social and economic Institutions and 
structures as well as the impact of modern European developments 
on integration. (France, Germany, United Kingdom, USSR, Yugoslavia, 
Czechoslovakia, Sweden and Switzerland.) 



PS 283 



Comparative Political Systems: Latin America. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Political modernization and development in Latin America. Political 
institutions, national identity, leadership, integration, political sociali- 
zation, and political Ideologies, 



PS 284 



Comparative Political Systems: Africa. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Emphasis is given to political institutions, political parties, 
transition from colonialism to nationhood. Nigeria. Kenya, 
and South Africa will be among the nations examined. 



and the 
Uganda, 



pC *30R T*"^ Legislative Process. 
r O M^\J^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PS 121. 

An analysis of the legislative process in the American political system. 
Stress will be placed upon legislative functions, selection and re- 
cruitment of legislative candidates, legislative leadership, the com- 
mittee system, legislative lobbyists, legislative decision-making, legis- 
lative norms and "folkways" and legislative-executive relations. 



PS 309 



The American Presidency. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The origins of the Presidency and a number of presidential models. 
The role of the President as Commander-in-Chief, legislative leader, 
party leader, administrator, manager of the economy, director of 
foreign policy, and advocate of social justice. The nature of Presi- 
dential decision making as well as the source of presidential authority, 
power, and influence. 



pC O'a 1 Political Theory and the Supreme Court. 
■ ^ '^'^ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; PS 121. 

This course will examine the writings of prominent judicial theorists 
and political scientists on how Supreme Court Justices "ought" to 
decide cases, the political impact of the Supreme Court, the justice 
as a politician, and the implementation of judicial decisions in the 
political arena. Cases now pending before the Supreme Court will be 
examined in light of the above issues. 



DC OQC^ Comparative Political Systems; Middle East. 
~^ ^Oi? Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Political, social and economic structures, the impact of the west, the 
emergence of national states, and the process of political develop- 
ment. Individual countries such as Turkey, Egypt, Lebanon, Syria, 
Jordan, Iraq and Iran will be studied. 



PS 332 



Constitutional Law. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. (Formerly PS 302) 

Prerequisite: PS 121. 

The principles and concepts of the United States Constitution as 
revealed in leading decisions of the Supreme Court through the 
process of judicial review. 



DC *Z>r\A Political Parties. 
~«^ 0*>y*+ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PS 121. 

A study of political parties, voting behavior and pressure groups. 
Emphasis will be given to major activities and functions of the party 
system, party structure, the urban political machine, the psychological 
influences of voting, the sociology of voting, pressure group politics, 
presidential nominations and campaign strategy. 



DC *3QO Political Modernization. 
I^O >J^\J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A comparative analysis of political change and development. A study of 
the process of political transition, political integration and nation- 
building, institutional developments including political parties, military 
elites, youth, intellectuals, the bureaucracy, economic development, 
and political culture. 



136 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



DO ^OO State and Local Legislative Politics. 
''^'-r^.^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course will establish a mock legislative assembly with its ap- 
propriate committee system, lobbyists, administration and executive 
operatives and news media representatives. Running concurrently with 
the actual Connecticut General Assembly, the mock legislature will deal 
with actual proposals before the Assembly; hold committee meetings, 
public hearings, plenary meetings and debates; conduct press and 
public relations efforts; and utilize campus media. 



INSTITUTE OF LAW AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

Robert Harrison, Director 



Political Science majors may not take Institute courses for Political 
Science elective credit with the exception of PS 230 and PS 231. Other 
exceptions may be granted by the Director. Institute courses may, 
however, be taken for general elective credit. 



PS 461 



Political Theory: Ancient and Medieval. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: HS 111. 

A study of the foundations of western political thought. Plato, Ari- 
stotle, St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, 
and Rousseau will be covered. An attempt will be made to apply the 
political thought of these thinkers to such contemporary political ques- 
tions as why men seek power, what is justice, how should rulers ex- 
ercise power, the power of government over the individual as opposed 
to the rights of the individual, the role of the individual in a demo- 
cratic society. 



DC A,Q'0 Political Theory: Modern and Contemporary. 
*^ •-T'-'^i Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: HS 112. 

A study of the modern and contemporary political ideologies. Stress 
will be given to the major characteristics of ideology, the psychological 
and sociological functions of ideology, nationalism, the nature of 
totalitarianism, fascism, nazism, Marxian theory, communism and demo- 
cratic theory. 



PS 499-500 



Senior Seminar In Political Science. 

Credit. 3 semester hours. 

(Fo merly PS 416-417) 
Prerequisite: Permission of the department chairman. 
The construction and preparation of an individual research project in 
Political Science by the student and the presentation of t-hat project 
in oral form within the seminar and in written form as the Seminar 
Thesis. Required of all Political Science majors. 



DC CQQ Independent Study. 
T^^ ^JCC Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Directed research on special topics to be decided upon in consulta- 
tion with the Chairman of the Department. 



DC OO^ Public Attitudes and Public Policy. 
'*-^ ^^'-r Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A study of the sources of mass political attitudes and behavior and 
the effects of such attitudes and behavior on public policy. The course 
will examine techniques for influencing opinions including propaganda 
and mass media communications. 



PS 225 



Political Communications. 
Credit, 3 semester hoilrs. 

The dynamics of preparing effective public messages. The theory and 
application of social science techniques to political persuasion: talks 
to win attention, secure action, and overcome prejudice. Other topics 
to be considered are the choice, arangement and adaptation of ma- 
terials; audience analysis; and motivation. 

DC OOQ Legal and Public Interest Groups. 
' ^ ^^O Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course will examine through readings and field trips various in- 
stitutions in the legal culture. The emphasis will be on the purpose 
and function of each organization and on the vocational opportunities 
they offer. Among the institutions to be studied are the private and 
public interest law firm, administrative agencies, the New Haven Legal 
Assistance Corporation, the Public Defender's Office, the State and 
Local Legislatures, and State and Federal Courts. 

DC OQQ Legal Communications. 
'^ ^-^^~> Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course seeks to familiarize students with the kinds of legal docu- 
ments and written instruments employed by participants in the legal 
process. Students will learn to recognize and understand the purpose 
of writs, complaints, briefs, memoranda, contracts, wills and motions. 

DC 0*30 Anglo-American Jurisprudence. 
~*-' ^0\^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course will survey ideas about the nature of law. Among the 
legal philosophers examined will be Plato, Aristotle, St. Thomas Aquinas, 
John Austin, William Blackstone, Benjamin Cardozo, L. A. Hart and Oliver 
Wendell Holmes. The contribution to legal theory made by various 
schools of Jurisprudence (e.g., posivitism, legal realism) will also be 
examined. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



137 



pC 0*31 Judicial Behavior. 

• ^ ^O I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

An examination of American courts as political policy-making bodies. 
Topics considered include: the structure of the judicial system, the 
influence of sociological and psychological factors on judicial behavior, 
and the nature and impact of the judicial decision-making process. 

pC 0*30 Legal Procedure I. 

r O ^OO Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course is designed to provide a practical knov^ledge of basic 
civil procedure for the pre-lav* and para-legal student. The student will 
follow the complete course of a lawsuit, comparing the procedural rules 
of Connecticut with the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. Taught from 
the point of view of a practicing lawyer, pleadings, motions and legal 
dehnitions will be introduced and examined for their practical effect in 
the conduct of the lawsuit. 



PS 239 

The course wil 



Legal Procedure II. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

1,,^. v-v^u..,^ examme typical administrative procedure, following 

a case through an administrative hearing and then through the appeal 
process. The course is designed to enable pre-law and para-legal stud- 
ents to understand the informal and non-technical aspects of adminis- 
trative procedure. Procedure II will continue the emphasis that Pro- 
cedure I introduced to deal with processes from a practical and 
problem-solving viewpoint. 



pC ^/\C\ Legal Bibliography and Resources. 
~^ ^*-r\-f Credit, 3 semester hours. 

An introduction to legal bibliographical materials. Students will learn 
how to use various kinds of law books in solvmg research problems 
incident to advising clients and trying and appealing cases. The 
function of court reports, statutes, codes, digests, citators, loose-leaf 
services and treatises will be discussed. 



pC 'Q 1 C^ Political Bureaucracy. 
~^ ^-^ ' ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course will examine the nature and function of governmental 
bureaucratic organizations with particular emphasis on the decision- 
making process. Attention will be paid to the sources and consequences 
of increasing bureaucratization on the ability to govern. 



pC '30Q Legal Library Skills. 
'^ O^C7 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A systematic appraisal of the duties, responsibilities and skills required 
of para-professionals employed in law libraries. 



pC OOO Legal Investigation. 

' *^ '-J'^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course will provide students with the skills needed to conduct 
several kinds of investigations that are a routine part of the practice 
of law. Students will learn such tasks as how to search a title, and 
how to trace patent rights. Principles of fact-gathering in a wide range 
of cases (e.g., criminal, divorce, custody, housing, etc.) will also be 
explored. 



PS406 



Public Affairs Research. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Students will analyze, research and prepare recommendations on policy 
problems presented to the Institute by governmental bodies on the 
municipal, state and federal level. 



pC ,A1 C^ Internship in Public Affairs. 
r O *+ I i? Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Students will be assigned to a specific governmental agency and will 
have the opportunity to work in the field on current problems of public 
administration. Students will develop insights into the nature of public 
processes from the vantage point of an observer-participant and will 
meet weekly with other public affairs interns to share their observa- 
tions and experiences. 



per A'^C^ Computers and the Law. 
" ^ *+OW Credit, 3 semester hours. 

An analysis of the ways in which the advent of the computer is affect- 
ing law and the legal profession. Students will explore methods of 
using computers for legal research. Other topics include the effects of 
computers on criminology and the administration of justice, the impact 
of mass data banks on the right to privacy and freedom of choice. 



pC *30Q Legal Management and Administrative Skills. 
ir^ >S^Q Credit, 3 semester hours. 

An examination of the procedures and systems necessary to run a law 
office efficiently. Students will learn such administrative skills as how 
to interview clients, conduct legal correspondence and maintain legal 
records. Proven management techniques for keeping track of filing 
dates and fees, court dockets and calendars will also be examined. 



pC AAC^ Legal Research. 

' ^ *+*+W Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The purpose of this course is to give the student practical experience 
in researching and writing on realistic legal problems. Specific written 
assignments will require students to make use of all the library tools. 
Students will learn how to prepare and analyze legal memoranda and 
briefs. 



138 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



PSYCHOLOGY David Brown, Chairman 



PO(^£^ Research Design and Methods in Psychology II. 
<^^^^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: P 305. 

Methods of design and analysis in perception, learning, motivation, 

concept-formation, etc. Group and individual research projects. 



Pill Psychology. 

' ' ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Important principles of human behavior. Motivation, emotion, learning, 
personality, intelligence, etc. The utilization of psychological knowledge 
in relation to everyday human activities. 



PO 1 C Psychology of Learning. 
*^ ' *^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: P 111. 

Psychological principles underlying learning and teaching. 

theories and their application to behavioral change. 



Learning 



P212 



Business and Industrial Psychology. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: P 111. 

Psychological principles and research findings pertinent to adminis- 
tration in business and industry. Contemporary research of behavior 
factors in managerial contexts. 



P321 



P216 



Developmental Psychology. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: P 111. 

Processes of development of the child, adolescent and adult, motiva- 
tion changes in interests, attitudes, and abilities, social and cultural 
influences. 



P220 



Consumer Behavior. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: P 111. 

Principles and methodology in studying consumer decisions and actions. 
Internal and external influences upon consumer behavior; decision pro- 
cesses; relationships between consumers and both private and public 
organizations. 



Social Psychology. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. (Same as SO 320) 

Required of Psychology majors. 

Prerequisites: P 111 and SO 113. 

The interdependence of social organizations and behavior. The inter- 
relationships betv^een role systems and personality; attitude analysis, 
development and modification; group interaction analysis; social con- 
formity; social class and human behavior. 



POOft Abnormal Psychology. 
00\-> Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: P 111. 

Psychological and organic factors involved in personality disorgani- 
zation. The psychodynamics and classification of psychoses, neuroses, 
brain disorders, personality disorders, psychophysiological disorders, 
transient stress disorders, and mental retardation. 



PO^ 1 Psychological Theory I. 
'^** • Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites; P 305 and senior class status. 

The historical background of contemporary issues in modern psycho- 
logical schools. 



P301 



Statistics for Behavioral Sciences. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: 3 semester hours of mathematics at the college level. 
Consideration of statistical concepts pertinent to the behavioral 
sciences. Application of statistical techniques to experimental design 
and research findings. Required of Psychology majors. 



P342 



Psychological Theory II. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: P 341. 

Continuation of Psychological Theory I. Emphasis placed on contemporary 
problems of psychology in the light of twentieth century developments 
in theory. 



P305 



Research Design and Methods in Psychology I. 
Credit, 3 semester hours 

Prerequisites: P 111 and P 301. 

Methods of design and analysis in psychological research. Considera- 
tion of psychophysical methods, general variables, design problems, 
problems of inference. Required of Psychology majors. 



POK/^l Theory and Principles of Psychological Measurement. 
*^^'-' Credit. 3 semester hours. 

Required of Psychology majors. 

Prerequisite: P 301. 

The bases for constructing and evaluating standardized tests in psycho- 
logical, educational, and industrial applications. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



139 



Po^i Physiological Psychology. 
*^^ ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites; P 111, and SC 121, 122 or 123. 

Endocrinological, neural, sensory, and response mechanisms involved in 

learning, motivation, adjustment, emotion, and sensation. 

PO"7/^ Psychology of Personality. 
>^ y yj Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: P 216 and P 315. 

Major personality theories and their implications for understanding 

both normal and deviant personality developments. 

PCQQ Independent Study. 
JJI7^ Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with 
a maximum of 12. 

Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of department. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest to him. The course must be initiated by 
the student. 



PA '^ 1 ^ Municipal Planning. 
if^ »-3 I *^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Analysis of population and public expenditure, dis-economics of scale, 
development of new communities. Land-use controls, planned unit de- 
velopment. Components of urban growth policies are discussed. State 
and Federal policies effecting urban growth are stressed. 

DA OO/^ Municipal Finance and Budgeting. 
if^ >3^\J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; A 114 Municipal Accounting. 

This course involves the analysis of hscal policy on the municipal 
level. The financing of and budgeting for services, and improvements 
by local government. 



PA390 



Administrative Law. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The basic legal arrangement of administrative organization; rules gov- 
erning use and exercise of administrative powers; legal procedures 
for enforcement of bureaucratic responsibility. 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Frank McGee, Chairman 



PA405 



Personnel Relations in the Public Sector. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Review of personnel relations in the public sector with emphasis on 
new developments, especially such areas as collective bargaining, and 
productivity analysis. 



DA '3/^1 Principles of Public Administration. 
ii^ OW I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The development, organization, functions, and problems of national, 
state, and local administration. 



PA302 



Procedures in Public Administration. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; PA 301. 

Administration and management in government through the offices 

of planning, finance, personnel, and procurement. 



DA QOV ''^''^" ^'"' "^Eion^l Problems. 
~^^ OV-» / Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Methods and analysis of decision making related to urban problems. 
Topics include housing, poverty, transportation, planning, pollution, and 
urban renewal. 



PA309 



Assessment Administration. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course provides the student with knowledge of assessment pro- 
cedures of land, building and personal property. The effect of de- 
preciation and revaluation. A study of the assessment process. The 
function of the Boards of Tax Review is studied. 



DA /\.C\f^ Collective Bargaining in the Public Sector. 
r A\ *+WO Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Analysis of collective bargaining in the public sector with emphasis 
on legislation pertaining to government employees. 

DA A/\Ot Independent Study. 

• '^ *+*+i7 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Independent study to be performed in a project of interest to the 
student and under the direction of a faculty member to be desig- 
nated by the department chairman. Project, student, and faculty 
director must be approved by both the department chairman and the 
Dean of Business. 

DA AOtC\ Principles of Public Health Administration. 
r /A '■*^\J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

An examination of the patterns of public health activities, including 
the delivery systems in the United States. 



PA 491 



Public Health Law. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The role of law in public health. Enforcement and administration: 
legal tools and administrative technique of public health enforcement 
and administration. 



140 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



DA CIO Seminar in Public Administration. 
~f^ *J ' ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Selected topics related to public administration will be discussed. 



QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 

Warren Smith, Acting Coordinator 



QA333 



Advanced Statistics. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: QA 216. 

A course stressing advanced statistical concepts and statistical 
methods relating to business. Topics include tests of hypotheses, 
analysis of variance, sample designs, correlation and linear regression, 
index numbers, and time series analysis. 



RETAILING W. Smith, Acting Chairman 



OA 1 1 P^ Business Mathematics I. 
vv/-\ I I O Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course emphasizes basic mathematical techniques as they apply 
to business: logarithmic functions, progressions, exponential growth, 
and the mathematics of finance; linear and matrix algebra. 



DT 1 P 1 Retailing. 

rv I 1^1 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MK 105. 

Modern merchandising methods used by retail stores, including store 
organization, buying, pricing, receiving, marketing, publicity, selling, 
record keeping, and stock control. 



OA 1 PP^ Quantitative Techniques in Managament. 
'^'^ ' ^O Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: QA 118. 

With emphasis on more rigorous applications of quantitative techniques 
in Business, this course stresses probability theory and probabilistic 
decision models, systems of linear related analysis. 

OA P 1 f^ statistics. 

'^'^ ^ ' ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: QA 128 or equivalent. 

A course in elementary statistical concepts such as frequency dis- 
tributions, measure of central tendency, measures of variability, the 
normal curve, point and interval estimation, sampling distributions, 
and simple decision theory. 



QA250 



Quantitative Analysis. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: QA 128. 

Basic analytical geometry and functions, and differential and integral 

calculus used to solve business problems. 



/^ A '3 1 ,4 Research Techniques in Business. 
'^'^ "^ ' ^" Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: MK 105 and QA 128. 

Methods of determining customer reaction to goods and services offer- 
ed in the marketplace and to business establishments. Research design 
with special emphasis on surveys, questionnaires and image studies; 
rating, ranking and scaling techniques; procedures used in interviewing, 
tabulation, data analysis, and presentation of research results; and a 
brief overview of statistical decision theory. 



D~r" O/^Q Retail Advertising and Sales Promotion. 
•^ ' ^'-'^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MK 107. 

This course is intended to develop a sound approach to retail adver- 
tising. The difference in advertising techniques between various types 
of stores is stressed. The determination of what, how and when to 
promote and measurement of the retail market is also emphasized 
during the semester. 



RT212 



Textiles. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MK 105. 

A study of the nature, source, characteristics, applications, and uses 
of basic textile materials. The processes of manufacture are studied. 
End uses studied include women's, girls', infants', men's and boys' 
wear. Swatches are analyzed by students in class. 

D~r" p 1 O Furniture and Apparel Accessories. 
■^ ' ^ I O Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MK 105. 

Historical background of furniture, floor coverings, glassware, china- 
ware, and interior decoration, manufacturing processes and brand 
names. The uniqueness and design of apparel accessories is studied. 

DT p 1 C Retail Credit Management. 
■^ • ^ I i^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 111. 

This course treats retail credit operations. The consideration of pros- 
pective credit customers, the decision-making process involved in 
accepting or rejecting credit and finally, the collection of accounts 
are all viewed as they contribute to company objectives. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



141 



D"r" *3/^*3 Fashions in Retailing. 

•^ ' OWO Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MK 105. 

A history of fashion design in relation to the letail field. The work of 

prominent French, American and English designers is studied. Stress 

is placed on sales promotion aspects of the fashion industry as it 

relates to the retail field. 



RT310 



Retail Merchandise Management. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: MK 105 and RT 121. 

Deals with the planning and control of stock to contribute to achieve- 
ment of predetermined objectives. Current concepts, objectives, plan- 
ning, pricing and inventory control are all discussed. 



SCIENCE AND BIOLOGY 

H. Fessenden Wright. Chairman and Director of 
Environmental Studies 



*Courses that are usually scheduled every other academic year. 



SC 111-112 



Physical Science. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

The meaning of scientific concepts and terms and their relation to 
other areas of learning and to daily living. Development and unity of 
physical science as a field of knowledge. Subject material includes 
astronomy, physics, chemistry, and geology. 

^C^ 11*^ Physical Science Laboratory. 
iJK^ I I *_> Credit, 1 semester hour. 

Prerequisite: SC 111, to be taken with SC 112 or after. 
Direct experience with physical experimentation. Training in design, 
conduct, analysis, and reporting of physical experiments. Emphasis on 
historically important theories and experiments. Use of simple equip- 
ment leading to direct observable results. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 



SCI 15 



Nutrition and Dietetics. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Various types of foods, vitamins, minerals, enzymes, and hormones 
and the processes and products of digestion. Factors and effects of 
malnutrition, food additives, and spoiled food. Concepts and composi- 
tion of balanced and special diets. 



C/~* 1 1 f^ Fundamentals of Food Science. 
OV^ I I O Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Food sources, methods of preservation and storage, spoilage, sanita- 
tion, food contaminants, and food as a waste product are discussed 
at an elementary level. One hour of class time per week will be 
devoted to laboratory or field work. 

Laboratory Fee: $10.00. 

^^ 1^1 1 ^^ General Biology. 
^^> I ^ I - I ^^ Credit, 6 semester hours. 

The major areas of biology, the concepts and theories of the science. 
Cell structure and function are stressed during the discussion of the 
various organ systems. Genetics, animal behavior, ecology, develop- 
ment, evolution, and taxonomy are covered during the second term. 

^^ 1 ■P*^ Human Biology. 
-^^-^ I ^O Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SC 121 or permission of the instructor. 
A condensed study of Human Anatomy and Physiology stressing the 
major organ systems, and emphasizing the nervous, skeletal, muscular, 
endocrine, circulatory, urogenital, and sensory systems. Analyses of 
genetics, stress, physical anthropology, nutrition, disease, and con- 
temporary bio-behavioral issues are presented. Designed to replace 
SC 122 for those majoring in Psychology, Law Enforcement, Sociology, 
and Social Services. For laboratory credit, where needed, SC 132 may 
be taken concurrently or after completing the course. 

C^ 1 o^ Astronomy. 

*-'^-' I ^v-> Credit, 3 semester hours. 

An introduction to astronomy and the methods employed by astrono- 
mers in obtaining and analyzing information of the universe around us. 



SC 131-132 



General Biology Laboratory. 
Credit, 2 semester hours. 

To be taken with or after SC 121 or SC 122. 

The microscopic examination of cells and tissues and the dissection 
of various organisms from the earthworm to the fetal pig. Other ex- 
periments relate to classroom materials. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00 per semester. 



SC 135 



Earth Science. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A dynamic systems-approach to phenomena of geology, oceanography, 
and meteorology. Emphasis on inter-relations of factors and processes 
and on importance of subject matter to human affairs. Suitable for 
non-science as well as as for science majors. 

O/^ 1 ^f^ Fundamentals of Oceanography. 
^^^-* I '-•■^J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Description of major aspects of geological, chemical, physical, and 
biological oceanography. Emphasis on human use and disuse of oceans. 
Suitable for non-science as well as science majors. 



142 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



SC201 



Genetics. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 122, SC 123, SC 251, or SC 252. 
Mendelian genetics and developments that have produced the modern 
concept of inheritance,- the role of DNA and theories of the chemical 
basis of heredity. Various aspects of human, medicinal, and population 
genetics and the role of these In evolutionary processes. 

*C(~^ QO^ Genetics Laboratory. 
•^^-^ ^yj^ Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SC 201. 

Theory and techniques using flies, yeasts, bacteria, and viruses to 

Illustrate the classical genetic theories. An Introduction to biometrics. 

One assigned lecture-laboratory session and one laboratory period 

unassigned. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

*C^011 OIO Human Anatomy and Physiology. 
^^^-^ ^ ' ' ~^ ' ^ Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 122 and SC 132 or SC 251. 

The essentials of human anatomy and physiology. Systems studied one 
at a time, taking up the anatomical features first and then the physio- 
logical functions. Both normal and pathological conditions discussed 
whenever possible. 

*C^ Ol '3_01 /^ Human Anatomy and Physiology 

Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 122 and SC 132 or SC 251. 
To be taken with or after SC 211-212. 

Examination of organs and organ systems, using plastic models, slides 
of cells and tissues, human bones, and dissection of preserved mam- 
malian organs (cow's eyes, sheep's brain). Transparencies and film 
loops used as supplemental material. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00 per semester. 

C^ ^^1 Human Ecology. 

"^^^ ^"^ ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Ecosystem structure and function. Understanding human involvement 
in and alteration of ecosystems through use of resources and pollu- 
tion, economic, cultural and behavioral factors, overpopulation. 



Cir" ^^^ Ecology. 

*-'^-* ^^^. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC251 or SC 252. 

The interactions of living organisms, including man, with each other 
and with their environment. Discussion of population regulation, habi- 
tats, food supply, predation, and distribution, community structure 
regulation, succession, and diversity: ecosystems, geochemistry, and 
energy. 



C^ ^'O^ Human Ecology Laboratory. 
^^-^ £-^<J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 221 or any other course in ecology. 
Two class hours and one afternoon laboratory or field work devoted to 
current environmental regional problems, such as population trends, 
land use, resources, pollution, waste disposal, and transportation. Stu- 
dents taught to plan projected work, involving social, biological, and 
physical aspects of ecology. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

C^C^ ^^A fisid Ecology. 

^^^ ^^«-l- Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 222 (May be taken concurrently). 
One hour of class and one afternoon of laboratory in which basic 
ecological concepts will be demonstrated by the gathering' and inter- 
pretation of field and laboratory data. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 



SC 225 



Evolution. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SC 122. 

Biochemical and organic evolution studied. Physical anthropology and 
paleontology introduced, and the relationship of evolution to genetics 
and ecology. 

»C^ ^^7 Entomology w/Lab. 
"^^^ ^^ / Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 122 and SC 132 or SC 251. 

Study of classification, evolution, anatomy, development, ecology, life- 
cycle, genetics, and systematics of insects, arachnoids, and myriapods. 
Insects as major competitors of man, as disease carriers, and their 
influences on history and culture. Fundamental biological principles as 
related to insects. Laboratory: culture, observation, and dissection of 
insects. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

Q^ ^C^l Zoology w/Lab. 

•-^^-^ ^i*J I Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 121 and SC 131 or Biology major. 

The general morphology and physiology of animals from the amoeba 

to man, taken phylum by phylum. Dissection of representative 

animals from the major phyla, special emphasis on the Phyla 

Invertebrata. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

O^ ^C^P Botany w/Lah. 

^^^^ ^O^ Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 121 and SC 131 or Biology major. 
The comparative structure, function, habitat, and evolutionary rela- 
tionships of plants, techniques of plant identification and classification. 
Field trips conducted when possible. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



143 



SC 291-292 



Biology Laboratory Teaching. 
- - Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 122 and SC 132, and permission of the instructor. 
Designed for prospective teachers, department majors, and laboratory 
assistants. Students supervised by an instructor in techniques con- 
cerning laboratory instruction, testing, grading, purchase, and inven- 
tory of supplies and equipment. 

C^ '^Ol Microbiology w/Lab. 

^^-^ Ow I Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 121 and SC 131; or SC 251 or SC 252; OH 103. 
A history of microbiology and a survey of microbial life. Includes 
viruses, rickettsia, bacteria, blue-green algae, and fungi; their environ- 
ment, grovifth, reproduction, metabolism, and relationship to man. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00 

C^ '^O^ Bacteriology w/Lab. 
^^^ O*^^ Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites; SC 122 and SC 132; CH 103. 

Theoretical and laboratory study of the morphology, physiology, and 
classification of bacteria. The application of these facts to agriculture, 
industry, sanitation, public health, and disease. 

Laboratory Fee; $20.00. 

Cf^ *^0*^ Histology w/Lab. 
^^-* OVyO Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 121 and SC 131 or SC 251. 

Microscopic and chemical structure of organs and tissues and their 

cell constituents. Microscopic observations, tissue staining, and slide 

preparation. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

*0^ ^(^/l immunology w/Lab. 
'^^-* wW** Credit, 4 semester hours. 

The nature of antigens and antibodies, formation and action of the 
latter, other immunologically active components of blood and tissues, 
and various immune reactions. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

C^ '^OT Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy w/ Lab. 
♦-^^-' OWy Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SC 251. 

The structure, origin, and evolutionary history of the vertebrate organ 
systems. In the laboratory, representative species of each vertebrate 
class dissected, with attention given to the individual organ systems. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

C^ *^OJ^ General Physiology w/Lab. 
•^V-> -J\J<:3 Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 251-252, CH 105-106, PH 103-104, PH 105-106. 
Basic theories of physiology as applied to plants and animals. Practical 
aspects and experimental techniques studied in the laboratory. 

Laboratory Fee; $20.00. 



SC 309 



SC331 



Plant Morphology and Taxonomy w/Lab. 
Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; SC 252. 

Comparative plant structure and reproduction, particularly as related 
to the classification of plants. Laboratory parallels the classroom, 
involving examination of microscopic slides, models, preserved speci- 
mens, and gross structures of dissected materials. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

C^ *^^0 Forensic Medicine. 
^^> O^V-/ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 123 Human Biology; SC 132 General Biology Lab II; 
CH 106 General Chemistry II; CI 215 Introduction to Forensic Science. 
Introduction to the medico-legal aspects of medicine, emphasizing the 
relationship of the natural sciences. Injuries from various causes, ef- 
fects of poisons, sex-offenses, autopsies, and estimation of time of 
death will be covered. History of Forensic Medicine, its limitations 
and progress, odontology, malpractice, and organ transplants will be 
discussed. 

Animal Behavior. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites; SC 122 and P 111. 

Behavioral patterns of animals studied on a comparative basis. Laws 
and principles of ethology related to genetics, psychology, ecology, 
evolution, physiology, and social structure. 

C/'" *3,^0 Principles and Practice of Aquaculture. 
^^^ 0*+^ Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites; SC 251 Zoology w/Lab. 

The fundamentals of nutrition, bionomics, water quality control, system 
and diseases in aquaculture. Experimental, developmental and applied 
systems for marine and freshwater organisms discussed. Finfish, mol- 
lusk and crustacean production emphasized. Consideration is given 
to the economics of protein production. Field trips to hacheries and 
research laboratories. 

Laboratory Fee; $20.00. 

C^ '^C^ 1 Biochemistry I w/Lab. (Bio-organic Chemistry.) 

•^^-^ <J^^ • Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 122, SC 132 or SC 251, and CH 106. 
Functional groups of organic compounds, the physiological properties 
of these classes of compounds, and the mechanisms of their elimination 
from the system. The interaction and synthesis of these compounds 
will also be studied. Lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

O^ '^fiQ Biochemistry II w/Lab. 
•^^-^ »J\J^ Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites; SC 361 or CH 104-108 or CH 301-302. 
Amino acids, proteins, enzymes, coenzymes, vitamins, carbohydrates, 
nucleaic acids, lipids, and certain alkaloids are discussed as to their 
chemical, physical, and biological properties. Isolated enzyme reactions 
and the more important metabolic pathways are examined. 

Laboratory Fee; $20.00. 



144 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



*C^ A.C^'X Embryology w/ Lab. 
■^^-^ '^■v-' I Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SC 251. 

Origin and development of tissues, organs, and organ-systems during 
the embryonic and post-embryonic stages. In the laboratory, the chick 
grown and studied at various stages. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

*C^ AC\^ Cytology w/Lab. 
^^-^ '-tKJ^ Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SC 362. 

Structure and basic concepts of cellular and tissue function on the 
molecular, subcellular, and cellular level, problems and techniques of 
cellular biology. Tissue culture techniques in laboratory. The micro- 
scope and audio-visual equipment also employed. 

Laboratory Fee; $20.00. 



SC 501 



Parasitology w/Lab. 
Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SC 251. 

Life history, physiology, morphology, reproductive cycle, and economic 
importance of most common parasites of plants and animals. Spread 
and control of communicable and organic diseases. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 



*C^ CS/^O Fresh Water and Marine Biology. 
;:?\-^ ■^JKJ^ Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 251, SC 252, and SC 222. 

Aquatic organisms, their life-cycles, and their ecological factors. 

Causes of pollution when equilibria are upset. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 



SC 503 



Pathology w/Lab. 
Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SC 251. 

Causes, symptoms, progress, effect and control of diseases of animals, 
primarily man. Laboratory observation of diseased cells, tissues, and 
organs will be conducted partly at the University of New Haven and 
partly at St. Raphael's Hospital. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 



*C(~' C\C\A Phycology and Mycology w/Lab. 
»:3V_^ ^JKJ*-* Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 251 and SC 252. 

Fresh-water and certain marine algae and the various types of fungi. 
Structure, physiology, life-cycles, reproduction, nutrition, ecology, their 
function as disease producers. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 



*C(~* ^O^ Neuroendocrine Physiology. 
•^^-' wW«J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: P 111; SC 123 or SC 212. 

Morphology and physiology of the neurological and endocrine systems 
as related to the control of body functions. Relationship to behavior 
with examples from psychobiology and ethology. 



SC 506 



Food Science and Technology. (Sanitation). 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 301-302; SC 361-362. 

Man's food, its spoilage, preservation, and sanitation are presented. 
Food additives and the waste and pollution of the food industry are 
also studied. 



SC 507 



Characterization and Treatment of Wastes w/Lab. 
Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 135; SC 306; SC 361-362; or SC 301-302; and CH 211. 
The types of waste materials generated by agriculture, industry, trans- 
portation, municipalities, and individuals are classified, and the methods 
of their identification are studied. The various methods of treatment 
of each type of waste material are covered. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

*C(~' ^C^Q Water Quality Control and Pollution Ecology w/Lab. 
^\^ *J\^^D Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 301 or SC 302; SC 502 and SC 507. 
Recognition of the organisms of polluted waters and the selection of 
the most appropriate means of collection and analysis. Proper choice 
and use of analytical methods for determining water quality with the 
methods of analyzing the data. The most efficient methods to establish 
water purity of the desired quality and the ecology of polluted water 
containing various wastes. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

O^ C^OQ Scientific Photographic Documentation. 
•^^^ «J\^S' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

2 lectures and 1 laboratory per week. 

Prerequisites: SC 121-122 or SC 251-252 and instructor's permission. 
Theory and practice of photographic image formation and recording. 
Lecture, demonstration, and laboratory experience. Photography and 
documentation of natural objects, organisms, and artifacts of bio- 
logical, medical, pathological, and forensic interest. Photomicroscopic, 
ultra-violet, infra-red, color, and black and white techniques. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

+ C^ ^1 O General Environmental Health. 
•^^^ ^ ' *-* Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 122, SC 123 or SC 251; SC 301 or SC 302; and CH 
105. 

Communicable diseases and their spread and control; environmental 
factors affecting public health, applications of the principles of sani- 
tation and health to the solution of environmental problems. Popula- 
tion trends and the collection and evaluation of statistics concerned 
with public health. Various aspects of preventive medicine. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



145 



*Cf^ C^l '^ *'■' Pollutants w/Lab. 
^^^ ^ ' »-^ Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CH 104-108; CH 201; SC 301 or SC 302; SC 361-362. 
Physical, chemical, and biological properties and sources of the major 
air pollutants. New and older methods of sampling, identification, and 
measurement are presented. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

*C^ U^^ A Air Quality Control and Management w/Lab. 
^^-^ ^ ' ^ Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SC 513 (can be taken concurrently). 
Historical presentation and definition of air pollution problems. Ap- 
proaches for abatement and presentation and the strategy to achieve 
objectives of air quality that meet regional standards. Fundamentals of 
meteorology. Health and welfare effects of air pollutants, political, 
and legal control measures. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

*C(~* CI C Biophysics I w/Lab. 
^^-' ^ ' *-' Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CH 106; SC 362; PH 104-106; M 116. 
Principles and properties of large and small molecules in solutions, 
particularly in body fluids. Physical laws and theories of gases, liquids, 
and solutions. Thermal chemistry and reaction rates as related to bio- 
logical systems. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 

*Cf^ ^1 ^ Biophysics II w/Lab. 
•^^-^ ^ ' ^ Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CH 106; SC 362; PH 104-106; M 116. 

Physical laws and theories as related to muscle, skeletal, sense organ, 

nerve and other physiological actions. 

Laboratory Fee; $20.00. 

*C(^ C^l V C^l Q Bio-Techniques. 
•^^^ *-f I y -«-' I O Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: Biology major and permission of instructor. 
Clinical and research techniques used in the biological sciences. 
Advanced microscopy, photomicroscopy, cell and tissue culturation, 
clinical techniques, and instrumental procedures. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00 per semester. 

*Of^ ^1 Q Pharmacology w/Lab. 
^^^ *^ ' ^ Credit, 4 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: SC 122 or SC 123 and SC 132; or SC 251-252; SC 361 
or CH 302. 

Science of medicinals and other chemicals and their effects produced 
by use and abuse on living organisms, the mechanisms whereby these 
effects are produced. Relation of structure to activity methods of 
assay, and metabolic pathways involved. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 



*C^ C^^l Toxicology w/Lab. 
^^^ i?^ I Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 122 or SC 123 and SC 132, or SC 251-252; SC 361 
or CH 302. 

The action of chemicals, particularly poisons, on living organisms. 
Relation of structure to activity, mechanisms of detoxication (in vivo), 
and reason for activity studied. Methods of isolation, identification and 
characterization from tissues, toxic limits, methods of assay, types 
of antidotes used. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 



*C/-' C^O/l Psychobiology. 
^>-> *J^*-T Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: P 111, SC 122 or 123, SC 132, and CH 106. 
A study of the biological factors of behavior, with concepts drawn 
from numerous related disciplines, such as physiology, pharmacology, 
ethnology, ecology, anthropology, psychology, and biochemistry. One 
of the more recent advances in this field is that of the environmental 
impact on behavior patterns. 



SC 561-562 



Advanced Biochemistry. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SC 362. 

Enzymology and the more important metabolic pathways, including 
those of alkaloid synthesis. Physiological results due to various 
enzymatic reactions. 



O^ P^QI C^Q'^ Seminar and Senior Thesis. 
^V-' ^57 I -%J^^ Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: Biology major in 3rd or 4th year. 
Hourly weekly meetings during which prepared papers are read by 
members of the class. Each student, with his adviser, must select a 
topic which from library sources is developed into a "Library Thesis." 
The contents of this thesis must be defended before department 
faculty members. 



O^ ^Q^ C^Qfi Laboratory Research. 
^^-^ Zj^iJ-iJ^\J Credit, 1-6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: Biology major. Permission of the department. 
Choice of a research topic, literature search, planning of experiments, 
experimentation, and correlation of results in a written report, under 
the guidance of a department faculty member. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00 per semester. 



C(^ C^QQ Independent Study. 

^<^ *J^^ Credit, 1-3 semester hours, maximum of 6. 

Prerequisites: Biology major. Permission of the department. 

Laboratory Fee: $5.00 per credit hour. 



146 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



SOCIOLOGY AND SOCIAL WELFARE 

Faith H. Eikaas, Chairman 



QO 11*^ Sociology. 

•jv^ I I ^J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The role of culture in society, the person, and personality; groups and 
group behavior; institutions; social interaction and social change. 



SO 218 



SO 114 



Contemporary Social Problems. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113. 

The major problems which confront the present social order, and the 

methods now in practice or being considered for dealing with these 

problems. 



SO 123 



Drug Addiction: Social. Cultural and 
Historical Roots. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Students gain insight into the current drug use phenomenon through 
examination and analysis of historical and contemporary writings; pat- 
terns of drug use are traced over time and across cultures to delineate 
commonalities and differences utilized in identifying trends; economic, 
social, cultural and psychological factors are considered and preventa- 
tive and curative efforts are evaluated. 



CO 1 ^^ Women In Society. 
■^^<-^ • *-'»-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A multi-disciplinary overview of woman's role In the social system. Dis- 
cussion includes myths and realities of sex differences (biological, 
psychological, anthropological, sociological, historical). Areas covered 
include in depth analysis of the relationship of women and the economy, 
the arts, science, and how these effect and determine the behavior of 
women in contemporary society. 



The Community. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113. 

The Community and its provision for health, education, recreation, 
safety, and welfare— theoretical concepts of "Community" plus case 
studies of small scale human communities used to introduce students 
to fundamental concepts of "Community" — ethnographies include 
studies of factories, hospitals, primitive villages, small towns, etc. 



OO ^^O Physical Anthropology and Archaeology. 
'^'^ ^^^<J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

An introduction to the stages of human evolution in prehistory and to 
the techniques of archaeologists investigating prehistory. Includes the 
measurement of geological time, primate evolution, early types of men 
and their culture as well as a basic introduction to archaeological 
methods. 



CO ^^1 Cultural Anthropology. 
^^<^ ^^ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A systematic survey of the customs of man found in preliterate 
societies as well as modern societies. A study of the evolution of 
culture and analyses of religion, economics, language, kinship, art, 
etc. as found in primitive and modern cultures. 



CO ^*51 Juvenile Delinquency. 

-J^<^ ^*-' I Credit, 3 semester hours. (Same as CJ 221) 

Prerequisites: SO 113 and P 111. 

This course is offered as CJ 221 in University schedules. 

An analysis of delinquent behavior in American society; examination of 

the theories and social correlates of delinquency, and the socio-legal 

processes and apparatus for dealing with juvenile delinquency. 



SO250 



Research Methods. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore status. 

The student develops the concepts necessary for selection and formu- 
lation of research problems in social science, research design and 
techniques, analysis and interpretation of research data. 



SO 214 



Deviance. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or permission of instructor. 
This course is centered around deviance as a social product. The 
problematic nature of the stigmatization process will be explored in 
such areas as alcoholism, crime, mental illness and sexual behavior. 



CO '^1 O Primary Group Interaction. 
•^^<^ >^ i\J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113. 

Exploration of communication in group process, building a group and 
analyzing group structure and interaction; the ways people communi- 
cate emotionally and intellectually. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



147 



SO 311 



Criminology. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. (Same as CJ 311) 

Prerequisites: P 111 and SO 113. 

An introduction to the principles and concepts of Criminology: 

analysis of the social context of criminal behavior, including a review 

of criminological theory, the nature and distribution of crime, the 

sociology of criminal law, and the societal reactions to crime and 

criminals. 



S0312 



Marriage and the Family. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113. 

The structure and function of the family in American Society: analysis 
of social relations within the institution. Factors contributing to its suc- 
cessful functioning, and those leading to alienation and social dis- 
organization. 



C/^ '^^1 Sociallnequaiity. 
^^^ O^ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113. 

Organization of social class: status, power, and process of social 
mobility in contemporary society. Social stratification, its functions 
and dysfunctions, as it relates to the distribution of opportunity, 
privilege, and power in an industrial society. 



C/^ *^^^ Sociology of Education. 
^'^ O^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The effects of education on American society: the organizational 
structure of educational systems at the primary, secondary and uni- 
versity levels with major emphasis on the interactive roles of students, 
teachers and administrators— particular concern with the relationship 
between education and socio-economic status and with problems 
of organizational change in the American school system. 



SO 31 3 



Sociology of Leisure. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or permission of the instructor. 
Leisure in society — a macro-analysis investigation of the relationships 
between leisure and primary groups, social institutions and social 
processes; emphasis on the utility of the sociological perspective for 
understanding leisure and sport as a social phenomenon. 



CO *^1 C^ ^'"^'^' Change. 

-^^^ »-> I w Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113. 

Sources, patterns, and processes of social change with examination 
of classical and modern theories of major trends and developments 
as well as studies of perspectives on micro levels of change in 
modern society. 



S0318 



Political Sociology. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113. (Offered even years, spring semester) 
Concepts, theories, and basic issues in the sociological analysis of 
political systems, social factors in political attitudes and behavior 
with emphasis on understanding the functional and dysfunctional 
aspects of socio-political coordination and conflict. 



CO *^^0 ^*"^'^' Psychology. 

•^'^ >^^yj Credit, 3 semester hours. (Same as P 321) 

Prerequisites: P 111 and SO 113. 
This course is offered as P 321 in University schedules. 
The interdependence of social organizations and behavior. The inter- 
relationships between role systems and personality; attitude analysis, 
development, and modification; group interaction analysis; social 
conformity; social class and human behavior. 



C/^ 1 Population and Ecology. 
•^^^ '^>^ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or permission of instructor. Offered odd years, 

spring. 

Societal implications of population changes and trends — impact of 

man as a social animal upon natural resources — cultural values and 

social structures, their influence on environmental ethics. 



CO '5'^'^ Sociology of Aging. 
^^^ OOO Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or permission of instructor. 
A study of the sociological phenomenon of aging in America. The course 
will analyse the problems of age grading and prejudice, the demo- 
graphic components of aging, and will survey major policies and pro- 
grams with respect to this segment of population. Major theoretical and 
applied studies will be reviewed systematically, especially with respect 
to medical and psychological institutionalization and problems of the 
self-managing old. 



CO *^*^~7 Sociology of Human Sexuality. 
•^'^ OO / Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or permission of instructor. 
A scientific study of human sexual behavioral patterns, social class at- 
titudes and cultural myths. The first section begins with human re- 
productive systems, conception, pre-natal development and birth. The 
second section deals with cross-cultural sexual attitudes and behavioral 
patterns, social and psychological research studies, population and fer- 
tility problems, social aspect of abortion and sexual laws. The third 
section probes sexual deviance patterns, sex education curriculum and 
instruction, sexual themes in mass media and artistic attitudes re- 
garding human sexuality. 



148 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



C/^ '^^O Medical Sociology. 
*-'^«-^ 0*+W Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or permission of the instructor. Offered even 
years, spring. 

An analysis of one of our major social institutions, the health care 
field. Emphasis will be placed on the sociocultural aspects of the field: 
a general overview of the organization and delivery of health care 
services and the current problems and issues. 



C/^ '^QO Sociology of Organizations. 
^'»-' *-'^'^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or permission of the instructor. Offered even 
years, spring. 

Classical sociological theories of organization with emphasis on the 
concepts of bureaucracy, scientific management, human relations and 
decision making theory. The relevance of these ideas to concrete 
organizational contexts, e.g., civil service, business, social movements 
and political parties, charitatile Institutions, hospitals, etc. 



CO >d.OO (Minority Group Relations. 
•-'^>^ '-i■^-'V-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SO 113. 

An interdisciplinary survey of minority groups in this country with 
particular attention paid to those ethnic, religious, and racial factors 
that influence interaction. Designed to promote an understanding of 
sub-group cultures. 



CO ,410 ^'^^'^ Sociology. 
^-'^^■^'-riyj Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113. 

The problems of the cities. Residential patterns together with the 
physical development of cities and redevelopment plans. An examina- 
tion of groups of people and their environment and the relationship 
between the two. 



CO ,41 '^ Social Theory. 

'^'^-' ^" ' ^-^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Nine hours in Sociology. 

An analysis of the development of sociology in the nineteenth cen- 
tury with particular emphasis on the theories of Comte, Durkheim, 
Simmel, Weber, Marx, de Tocqueville, and others. 



CO 414. Sociology of Occupations and Professions. 
■^^^^ *-r I *-r Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or permission of the instructor, 

A sociological analysis of the division of labor, occupational groupings, 

career patterns and professional associations in modern society. 



S0418 



Public Opinion and Social Pressure. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SO 113, P 111 (offered even years, fall semester). 
An intensive analysis of the nature and development of public opinion 
with particular consideration of the roles, both actual and potential, 
of communication and influence. 



C/^ 440 Undergraduate Seminar. 
^'^ *+*+v-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of departmental chairman. 
Required of Sociology majors. A detailed examination of selected 
topics in the field of sociology and a critical analysis of pertinent 
theories with emphasis on modern social thought. 



CO 441 Sociology of Death and Suicide. 

^'^ *+*+ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: So 113 or permission of instructor. 
A confrontation with individual mortality and an academic investiga- 
tion of primarily suicidal phenomena are explored within a context of 
crisis intervention. 



SO 450 



Research Seminar. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: P 301 or M 128. 

The student develops and carries out an original research project 

social science, reporting his procedure to the class. 



SO OO 1 -002 Credit, 1-6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the department chairman. 
Field experience in sociology or anthropology. Seminars in conjunc- 
tion with this experience before off-campus field work is undertaken. 
Contact during the field work experience and guidance by the mentor 
provide an opportunity for understanding group and individual dynamics 
and their repercussions. Follow up seminars and a paper are required. 



CO RQQ Independent Study. 
^'^ ■sJC?^ Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with 
a maximum of 12. 

Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of department. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be initiated by 
the student. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



-149 



SOCIAL WELFARE CONCENTRATION 

Michael Wynne, Coordinator 



SW220 



Introduction to Social Welfare. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113. 

A historical and philosophical perspective of social welfare services 
and social work practice is explored. Events, ideas, persons, political, 
economic and social forces that contributed to the development of the 
welfare state are examined. 



SW340 



Group Dynamics. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SO 113, SW 220 or permission of instructor. 
An examination of the nature of groups, the laws of their development, 
and their mteractions with individuals, other groups and larger insti- 
tutions. The manner in which groups affect the behavior, thinking, mo- 
tivation, and adjustment of individuals is also explored. The course 
will also utilize the students personal experiences in class interaction. 
This will include make up stages, verbal and non verbal communica- 
tion, and their place in the larger society. A beginning exploration of 
the role of the small group as a therapeutic method will be utilized. 



SW 41 5-41 6 



Methods of Intervention I and II. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SW 350-351. 

An introduction is given to the generic aspects of social work methods 
of intervention into various client systems. This involves problem iden- 
tification, consideration of institutional resources, goal formulation, 
strategy selection, implementation procedures, evaluation techniques, 
and policy implications. Case records and films are used to augment 
material. 



SW475 



issues in Social Work. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SW 401. 

Examination of issues in the relation of the state to social services, in- 
tergovernmental relations, scope and control of administrative powers, 
and the impact of alternative policy decisions. 



SW599 



Independent Study. 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester 

with a maximum of 12. 

Prerequisite: Consent of faculty member and chairman of department. 
Designed to permit the student to pursue research in a subject of in- 
terest to him under the direction of a faculty member. 



SW350-351 

Prerequisite: SW 220. 



Social Welfare as a Social Institution 

I and II. 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 



1. The background and development of the social services in relation 
to economic, political and social systems; analysis of the organiza- 
tion and delivery of social services in an industrial society. 
Analysis of social welfare policies and programs including public 
assistance, social insurances, urban renewal, anti-poverty programs, 
revenue sharing and emerging policies for income maintenance. 



TEACHER EDUCATION Philip Olgin, Director 



C"PJ OOK The Adolescent Student. 
^'— ' ^^w Credit, 3 semester hours 

Study of the theory and principles of the development of the adoles- 
cent from puberty to maturity. The physical, intellectual, emotional, 
social, and moral growth and development of the adolescent. 



C\A/ /101 yir^O Field Instruction I and II. 
O VV '■i'KJ I -'^y^^ Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Coordinator of Social Welfare. 
Supervised experience relevant to specific aspects of social welfare in 
public and private agencies, institutions, and organizations at the 
local, state and federal level. Seminars are held twice a week to assist 
students with the integration of theoretical knowledge and field tech- 
niques. Students are required to spend 8 hours a week in the field. 



ED 324 



History and Philosophy of Education. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A critical study of philosophical ideas and conflicting philosophies of 
Education viewed from historical perspectives and compared with cur- 
rent practices. A major purpose of this course is to develop an objec- 
tive approach to educational points of view accompanied by discrim- 
inating historical research. Implications for contemporary educational 
practice are reviewed. 



150 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



pr^ '^/l^ Directed Observation of the Secondary School. 
C- L-' O'+O Credit, 3 semester hours. 

3 periods weeldy plus Laboratory to be arranged. 
Structured as a Practicum. Directed visits to selected secondary 
schools. Laboratory field experiences include participation, tutoring, 
group meetings, and individual conferences. Emphasis on the prin- 
ciples and problems of the secondary schools as developed through 
group and individual laboratory experiences. 



ED 447 



Teaching in the Secondary School. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

General methods of teaching, problems confronting the inexperienced 
teacher such as discipline, lesson plans, teaching procedures and 
techniques, planning assignments, testing, grading, reporting to par- 
ents, and co-curricular activities; procedures are adapted to the major 
field of the student. 



TylQI AOf^ Performing Arts Seminar. 
«+C7 I -«+c7^ Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

Workshop in special areas of the performing arts: drama, film, dance, 

radio, television. Criticism, writing, directing, performing, design. 

-r CQQ Independent Study. 
' ^^^ Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with 
a maximum of 12. 

Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of department. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be initiated 
by the student. 

See performing arts courses in the Music Department and correlative 
courses in the Art Department. 



p-r-N /If^K The Teaching-Learning Process. 
CU '■¥\JiJ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Psychological principles underlying teaching procedures in the class- 
room; application of psychological findings and methods to educational 
practice; learning, motivation, and individual differences as they 
apply to effective teaching. 



WORLD MUSIC 

Ralf E. Carriuolo, Coordinator 



THEATER ARTS John Collinson, Coordinator 



MU 106 



Chorus. 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours. 

Styles of group singing, survey of choral music literature from around 

the world. 

Also available as an extra-curricular activity. 



T1 '^ 1 1 '^^ Introduction to the Performing Arts. 
I O I - I O^ Credit, 6 semester hours. 

An introduction to such dramatic arts as theater, opera, ballet, film. 
Their historical development, particular problems, and special possi- 
bilities. Emphasis on informed appreciation. Practical work in a 
medium. 



T141-142 



World Drama and Theater. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Dramatic literature from classical times to the present, considered in 
its contemporary setting. 



MU 111 



introduction to Music. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Some of the basic forms and styles of music in the Western World. 
Music Appreciation. 



MU 112 



Introduction to World Music. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Various non-Western musical styles, their cultures and aesthetics; 
music of the indigenous cultures of the Americas and the advanced 
musics of the Near East and Far East; emphasis on India, the Orient, 
Southeast Asia. Africa and Indonesia. 



T 341 -342 



Acting and Directing. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Exercises in acting and directing, moving from the elementary to the 
complex. Emphasis on acting during the first semester and directing 
during the second. The student may participate in major workshop 
productions. 



MU 116 



Performance. 

Credit, 1-8 semester hours; maximum 3 credit 

hours per semester. 

Open to all students interested in ensembles or private instruction. 
Students with adequate scholastic standing may carry this course for 
credit in addition to a normal program. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



151 



MU 150-151 



Introduction to Music Theory. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

A basic introduction to the fundamentals of music: notation, physical 
and acoustical foundations, harmony and melody, modality, tonality, 
atonality; consonance and dissonance, tension; introductory composi- 
tion, and ear training. 



MU416 



Advanced Performance. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Permission of the departmental staff and a 



Prerequisite: Permission of the departmental staff and a faculty 

advisor. 

Preparation and presentation of an instrumental or vocal performance 

illustrating sufficient proficiency to w/arrant the awarding of a degree 

in World Music. 



MU 198-199 



Introduction to American Music. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Music of the North American continent from the Puritans to the 
present day; both European and non-European musical traditions, with 
emphasis on 20th century developments. 



MU 201-202 



Analysis and History of European Art 

Music. 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 

The growth of Western Art Music from its beginnings to the present 
day. Analysis of musical masterpieces on a technical and conceptual 
basis. 



MU 250-251 



Theory and Composition. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Investigation of music theory in various parts of the world, including 
the Western Art Tradition. Exercises in the composition of music with- 
in these theoretical constructs. Ear training and keyboard harmony. 



MU299 



Problems of Music. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The problem of music as an art form throughout the world. Music 
aesthetics and its relationship to the performing and composing of 



IV/II I C^OO Seminar in Advanced Research. 
IVHJ ijy^KJ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Bibliographical studies of major world music areas; investigation of 
current and historical musicological theories, analysis and criticism 
of musicological area literatures. 



MU 550 



studies in Urban Ethnic Music. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

An investigation of the music tradition of inner city ethnic groups; 
emphasis on the operation of the oral tradition in the preservation of 
cultural values and customs as evidenced through music. Classroom 
discussion will be balanced by field research in the urban vicinity. 



MU599 



Independent Study. 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with a 

maximum of 12. 

Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and coordinator of depart- 
ment. 

Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be initiated by 
the student. 



IVII I '^OO Studies in Music I. 
IVIU <J\J\J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Area studies in music and its parent culture. Cultural theory as 
related to the musiC; instruments of the area and their etymologies; 
performance practices; the social role of music, both art and folk. 
Areas offered depending on availability of staff: China, Japan, the 
Near East, the Indian sub-continent, Africa, American Indian, Afro- 
American, Latin America, the Anglo-Celtic tradition, others. 



MU350 



studies in Music II. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Area studies in musical forms: their history, evolution, and resultant 
metamorphoses, performance practices, and present day forms extant. 
Areas offered depending upon availability of staff. 



■>-^ •«■;.■ 



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1^ 



'T£EE. 




ADMINISTRATION 



153 



THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 



NORMAN I. BOTWINIK, Chairman 
President, Botwinik Brothers, Inc. 

ROBERT M. GORDON, Vice Chairman 

President, Raybestos-Manhattan, Inc. 

GEORGE R. TIERNAN, Secretary 
Attorney at Law 

HUBERT C. HODGE, Assistant Secretary 
President, American Buckle Company 

GERY P. ALEXANDER 

Day Student, University of New Haven 

HAROLD G. ANDERSON 

The Southern Connecticut Gas Company 

JAMES Q. BENSEN 

Resident Manager, Bethlehem Steel Corporation 

ROLAND M. BIXLER 

President, J-B-T Instruments, Inc. 

MRS. KINGMAN BREWSTER, JR. 

PETER H. COMSTOCK 

Chairman of the Board and President, Pratt-Read Corporation 

CHARLES H. COSTELLO 

Chairman of the Board, C. Cowles & Co. 

ABBOTT H. DAVIS, JR. 
Vice President — Marketing 
The Southern New England Telephone Company 

ROBERT B. DODDS 

Chairman of the Board, Safety Electrical Equipment Corporation 



EDW/ARD J. DREW 

Manager, Quinnipiack Club 

JOSEPH F. DUPLINSKY 

President of the Alumni Association 

FREDERICK G. FISCHER 

Certified Public Accountant 

JOHN A. PREY 

President, Hershey Metal Products, Inc. 

ELLIOT GANT 

Investment Banker 

NATHAN HAMILTON 
Attorney at Law 

JOHN M. HEATH 

Adjunct Professor, University of New Haven 

ROBERT T. HOWLING 

Professor, University of New Haven 

JOHN J. HUNTER 

Evening Student, University of New Haven 

PHILLIP KAPLAN 

President of the University 

WILLIAM F. LEONARD 

Vice President, Civic and Government Relations 
Olin Corporation 

JOSEPH MACHNIK 

Associate Professor, University of New Haven 

J. CLARKE MATTIMORE 

Executive-in-Residence, University of New Haven 



154 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 



STANDING COMMITTEES 



ELLIS C. MAXCY 
Formerly, President 
The Southern New England Telephone Company 

TIMOTHY MELLON 

President. Eleven Thirty, Inc. 

GEORGE I. MORDECAI 

The Southern New England Telephone Company 

HERBERT H. PEARCE 

President, H. Pearce Company 

MRS. WILLIAM F. ROBINSON, SR. 

ROBERT W. RYAN 

Day Student, University of New Haven 

MRS. SHIRLEE SCHAFFER 

Writer and Commentator, WELI 

DONALD L. SHERMAN 

General Executive, YMCA of New Haven 

LOUISE J. SMITH 

Evening Student, University of New Haven 

EDWARD D. TADDEI 

Alumni Representative 

LEON J. TALALAY 

General Manager, B. F. Goodrich Sponge Products Division 

ROBERT M. TOnON 

General, Manager, New Haven Office 
New York Life Insurance Company 

MARY WALSH 

Day Student, University of New Haven 

CHARLES B. WOMER 

Director, Yale-New Haven Hospital 

FELIX ZWEIG 

Professor of Engineering and Applied Science, Yale University 



Executive Mr. Botwinik, Chairman; Mr. Gordon, Vice Chairman; 
Messrs. Bensen, Davis, Dodds, Fischer, Hodge, Kaplan, 
Mrs. Robinson, Messrs. Talalay, Tiernan. 

Finance Mr. Fischer, Chairman; Mr. Bensen, Vice Chairman; 
Messrs. Dodds, Duplinsky, Mattimore. 

Fund Raising Mr. Bensen, Chairman; Mr. Fischer, Vice Chair- 
man; Messrs. Bixler, Comstock, Dodds, Leonard, Mordecai, 
Talalay. 

Nominating Mr. Pearce, Chairman; Mr. Gant, Vice Chairman; 
Messrs. C. Costello, Frey, Mrs. Robinson. 

Personnel Mr. Talalay, Chairman; Mr. Taddei, Vice Chairman; 
Mrs. Brewster, Messrs. Sherman, Totton. 



SPECIAL COMMITTEES 



Buildings and Grounds Mr. Botwinik, Chairman; Mr. Talalay, 
Vice Chairman; Messrs. Alexander, Anderson, Drew, Hodge, 
Howling, Hunter, Mordecai, Taddei, Zweig. 

Development Mr. Bixler, Chairman; Mr. Maxcy, Vice Chairman; 
Mrs. Brewster, Messrs. Davis, Heath, Leonard, Machnik, 
Mellon, Taddei, Talalay, Zweig. 

Public and Industrial Relations Mr. Davis, Chairman; Mr. An- 
derson, Vice Chairman; Messrs. Comstock, Gant, Hamilton, 
Mattimore, Pearce, Ryan, Mrs. Schaffer, Mrs. Smith, Miss 
Walsh, Mr. Womer. 



ADMINISTRATION 



155 



ADMINISTRATION 



ADMINISTRATION — ACADEMIC 



Office of President 

PHILLIP S. KAPLAN, B.A, M.A., Ph.D., President 

DALEN A. BOWLES, Assistant to the Chairman of the Board 

and to the President 
MARY MENTO, Executive Secretary 

Office of Provost 

ALEXIS N. SOMMERS, B.S.M.E,, M.S., Ph.D., Provost 
MARION I. DePALMA, Executive Secretary 

Office of President Emeritus 

MARVIN K. PETERSON,- B.S. in Econ., M.Ed., L.H.D., President 
Emeritus and Special Assistant to the President 

DALEN A. BOWLES, Assistant to the Chairman of the Board 
and to the President 



STANDING COMMITTEES 

Academic Council Dr. Sommers, Chairman 

Academic Standing and Admissions Dr. Sommers, Chairman 

Board of Athletic Control Dr. Jewell, Chairman 

Board of Faculty Welfare Dr. Voegeli, Chairman 

Board of Security Control Miss Arbusto, Chairperson 

Commencement and Convocations Dr. Reams, Chairman 

Committee on Internal Affairs Dr. Kaplan, Chairman 

Deans' Council Dr. Sommers, Chairman 

Development Dr. Kaplan, Chairman 

Faculty Senate Dr. Grodzinsky, Chairman 

Library Mr. Baker, Chairman 

Personnel Policy Mr. Shattuck, Chairman 

Sabbatical Leave Committee Mr. Wiener, Chairman 

Student Aid and Services Mr. Ghoreyeb, Chairman 

Student Affairs Mr. Ghoreyeb, Chairman 

Teacher Education Advisory Dr. Olgin, Chairman 

Tenure and Promotion Dr. Voegeli, Chairman 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS 
Schools of Arts and Sciences 

DOUGLAS ROBILLARD, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Dean 

DAVID BROWN, B.S., M.A., Chairman— Psychology 

RALF E. CARRIUOLO, B.S., M.M., Ph.D., Coordinator— Music 

KEE W. CHUN, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Chairman— Physics 

JOHN COLLINSON, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Chairman— Humanities 

CAROLINE DINEGAR, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Chairman— Political 

Sci6nc6 
FAITH H. EIKAAS, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Chairman— Sociology 
BRUCE A. FRENCH, B.A., M.A., Coordinator— Foreign Lan- 
guages 
JOHNNIE M. FRYER, B.A., M.S., Chairman, General Studies 
THOMAS KATSAROS, B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., Chairman— History 
ROGER P. UNAHAN, B.A., Director— Fire Science 
PAUL MARX, B.A., M.F.A., Ph.D. Chairman— English 
ELIZABETH J. MOFFITT, B.F.A., M.A., Chairman— Art 
WILLIAM H. NYCE, B.S., Ch.E., M.S., Chairman— Chemistry 
PHILIP OLGIN, B.S., Ed.M., Ed.D,, Director— Teacher Educa- 
tion 
JOSHUA SANDMAN, B.A., M.A., Acting Chairman— Political 

SciGncG 
RICHARD M. STANLEY, B.E.S., M.S., Ph.D., Chairman— Mathe- 
matics 
H. FESSENDEN WRIGHT, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Chairman— Science 

and Biology 
MICHAEL J. WYNNE, B.A., M.A., Coordinator— Social Welfare 
DONALD WYNSCHENK, B.S., M.S., Chairman— Physical Educa- 
tion 
EDNA PAUL, Executive Secretary 
LOIS ANDERSON, Faculty Secretary 
VIOLA DUNNIGAN, Executive Secretary 
LUCILLE FACCADIO, Faculty Secretary 
GENEVIEVE LYSAK, Faculty Secretary 
IRENE NORTH, Faculty Secretary 
CAROLYN SMITH, Faculty Secretary 
*LOUISE ALLEN, Faculty Secretary 



156 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



ADMINISTRATION — ACADEMIC 



*CORNELIA MAS, Faculty Secretary 
*JULIE WOOD. Faculty Secretary 

School of Business Administration 

WARREN SMITH, B.A., M.B.A., Dean 

HOWARD FIDLER, B.S., M.B.A., Chairman— Hotel Administra- 
tion 

ROGER MILLEN, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Chairman— Management 
Science/Operations Management 

SHIV SAWHNEY, B.A., LLB., M.B.A., Ph.D., Chairman— Mar- 
keting/International Business 

FRANKLIN SHERWOOD, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Chairman— Eco- 
nomics 

JEFFREY L. WILLIAMS, B.S., M.B.A., Chairman— Accounting/ 
Finance 

COLLETTE FOLEY, Executive Secretary 

LOIS ANDERSON, Faculty Secretary 

DOROTHY BERMAN, Faculty Secretary 

MARIA DeLISE, Faculty Secretary 

CLARADOR FELDMAN, Faculty Secretary 

Division of Criminal Justice 

L. CRAIG PARKER, JR., A.B., M.Ed., Ph.D., Director 
ROBERT MURILLO, B.A., M.A., Academic Coordinator 
KATHLEEN ALLARD, Executive Secretary 
ANN CALLAHAN, Secretary 



School of Engineering 

THOMAS C. WARNER, JR., 
FRANCIS J. COSTELLO, 

Engineering 
RICHARD J. GREET, B.E.E., 

Engineering 
GERALD J. KIRWIN, B.S., 

Engineering 



3.E., M.S., Dean 

B.S., M.S., Chairman- 



-Industrial 



M.S., Ph.D., Coordinator— Materials 



M.S., Ph.D., Chairman— Electrical 



CONSTANTINE C. LAMBRAKIS, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Chairman- 
Mechanical Engineering 
JOHN C. MARTIN, B.E., M.E., Chairman— Civil Engineering 
VIOLA DUNNIGAN, Executive Secretary 
IRENE ASPRELLI, Faculty Secretary 
MARGARET BERTOLINI, Faculty Secretary 

Graduate School 

JOSEPH A. PARKER, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Dean 

GEORGE A. SCHAEFER, B.S., M.B.A., Associate Dean for Ad- 
ministration 

VIRGINIA KLUMP, Administrative Assistant 

GERALDINE DORMAN, Executive Secretary 

DANA MACY, Secretary 
*SONDRA MARSHALL, Secretary 
*SUSAN G. MOODY, B.A., Admissions Counselor 

Continuing Education 

RICHARD M. LIPP, B.S., M.B.A., Director 
J. MATTHEW CONNERY, B.A., M.A., Assistant Director 
MURIEL MacKAY, Continuing Education Registrar 
MARY ANN MIKOSKY, A.S., Secretary 

*MARY BURLISON, Secretary-Receptionist 

*DELMA HUEFFMAN, Admissions Secretary 

*FLORENCE POPPENDICK, Registration Secretary 

*MARCELLA SPADONI, Secretary-Receptionist 

Management Center 

WARREN J. SMITH, B.S., M.B.A., Acting Director 
COLLETTE FOLEY, Executive Secretary 

Special Studies 

VIRGINIA M. PARKER, A.B., Director 
SARA HADDAD, Secretary 

Office of Academic Development 

JOSEPH CHEPAITIS, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Director 
MARION I. DePALMA, Executive Secretary 



ADMINISTRATION 



157 



ADMINISTRATION — STUDENT AFFAIRS 



STUDENT AFFAIRS 
Office of Dean 

JOHN W. GHOREYEB, B.A., M.A., Dean 
DOROTHY I, LEVITSKY, Executive Secretary 



Admissions 

JOHN E. BENEVENTO, B.S., Wl.A, Director 
ROBERT A. CAMPBELL, B.S., M.A., Assistant Director 
PETER A. ROGERS, B.S., Admissions Counselor 
JEANNE M. D'AMBRUOSO, B.A., Admissions Counselor 
EVA WIDGER, Executive Secretary 
BEATRICE CORDONE, Secretary 
NANCY DeMARTINO, Secretary-Receptionist 
*YOLANDA COSTANZO, Secretary 

Black Student Affairs 
TO BE ANNOUNCED 



Career Development 

CHRISTIAN F. POULSON, B.A., M.B.A., 
MARLENE WAJNOWSKI, Secretary 



Director 



Counseling 

MICHAEL W. YORK, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Director 
G. BRUCE MUNRO, B.A., M.S., Assistant Director 
ANN MASSINI, Secretary 

Financial Aid 

DAVID DuBUISSON, B.A., Director 
ROBERT BRANCH, B.B.A., Assistant Director 
EVELYN SHERWOOD, Secretary 
ELEANOR JORCZYK, Secretary 



Housing and Health 

PHILIP S. ROBERTSON, B.A., M.S., Director 
*ANN HIMES, Secretary 

JON Wl. FESSEL, M.D,, University Physician 

IDA CUZZOCREO, R.N., Head University Nurse 
*AGNES QUINN, R.N., University Nurse 

Chaplains 

THE REVEREND ROBERT W. ANTHONY, Christ Church, West 

Haven 
THE REVEREND PAUL F. McLAUGHLIN, St. Paul's Roman 

Catholic Church, West Haven 
RABBI LEON MIRSKY, Congregation Sinai, Inc., West Haven 

Office of Veterans Affairs 

GEORGE A. SCHAEFER, B.S„ M.B.A., Coordinator 

C. TIM PACHNIESKI, B.A., Veterans Administration On-campus 

Representative 
ELEANOR JORCZYK, Secretary 

Office of Women's Affairs 

CAROLE AIKEN, B.A., M.A., Director 

Radio Station WNHU 

RICHARD L. GELGAUDA, B.S., General Manager 

Scheduling 

EARL 0. HAMEL, JR., A.B., Director 

Student Records 

JOSEPH MACIONUS, B.S., M.P.A., Registrar 
MARY BURDICK, Recorder 
HELEN CAREY, Secretary 
JUDY MITCHELL, Secretary 
ANN CHERNICK, Secretary 
*MARJORIE iVIANFREDA, Secretary 



158 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



ADMINISTRATION — GENERAL 

BUSINESS AND FINANCE 
Treasurer's Office 

FRANK G. HULL, B.S., Treasurer of University 
*ELSIE CALANORO, Secretary 

Business Office 

OLGA C. GRIFFETH, A.B., Director and Secretary of University 

LUCILLE DeSTEFANO, Accounts Payable 

JULIE HLYWA, Accounts Receivable 

ROSE MARIE HUGHES, Payroll 

ROSE KING, Accounts Payable 

FRANCIS MacMILLAN, Accounts Receivable 
*MARY LOU D'ADDIO, Accounts Receivable 
*LOIS UCAS, Accounts Receivable 

Data Center 

EDWARD T. GEORGE, B.S., M.S., D.Engr., Director 
FRANK A. S, ELLIOTT, B.S., Director of Computer Systems 
CYNTHIA KRANYIK, B.A., M.S., Academic Operations 
RAYMOND PULASKI, B.S., Manager Hardw/are Operations 
SALVATORE VOTTO, JR., B.S., Administrative Systems 
AUDREY KUSHNER, Unit Record Operator 
ROBERTA C. PECCERILLO, Secretary 
*ROBERT SCHUSTER. Computer Operator 

Procurement, Buildings and Grounds 

RALPH D. BYARD, M.B.A.. Director 
HELEN ROTHFUSS, Executive Secretary 
ANN AVGERINOS, Administrative Aide 
HARRY FLORENTINO, Supervisor of Maintenance 
RENO MERCADO, Supervisor of Custodians 

GENERAL UNIVERSITY 
Audio Visual 

CONSTANTINE C. LAMBRAKIS, B.S.E.E., M.S.M.E., Ph.D., Co- 
ordinator 
MARGARET BERTOLINI, Secretary 



University Development and Alumni Relations 

LAWRENCE C. PARKER, A.B., M.A., Director 
JANET SEYMOUR, Executive Secretary 
SARA HADDAD, Alumni Secretary 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

JOSEPH A. MACHNIK, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Acting Director 
PETER H. VANDER VEER, A.S., Director of Sports Information 
*BARBARA McGill, Secretary 



Grants Office 

AHMED R. MANDOUR, B.A., M.B.A., 
*ELSIE CALANDRO, Secretary 



Ph.D., Grants Officer 



Language Laboratory 

BRUCE FRENCH, B.A., M.A., Coordinator (on sabbatical) 
PAUL MARX, B.A., M.F.A., Ph.D. 

Library 

SAMUEL M. BAKER, JR., B.A., B.S., M.A., University Librarian 

RITA B. CONROY, Adminis. Asst. to University Librarian 
DOROTHY S. LOCKROW, B.A., M.A., Assistant University Li- 
brarian 
D. JEANNE MARTIN, Library Technician: Ordering 
EDITH C. LISSEY, Library Technician: Ordering 
ELIZABETH KUCHINSKI, Library Technician: Cataloging 
ANNETTE GREENHOUSE, Library Technician: Cataloging 
PATRICIA TAYLOR, Library Technician: Cataloging 
ELIZABETH F. SLAWSON, B.A., M.L.S., Circulation Librarian 

ELLEN V. LEUZZI, Library Technician: Circulation 
MICHAEL R. DESIDERIO, B.A., M.L.S., Reference Librarian 
DOROTHY M. RAWLINS, B.A., M.L.S., Reference Librarian 
BARBARA CAINE, Library Technician: Periodicals 
LAROLA F. B. GAMBLE, Librarian Technician: Documents 
*MARIE L. ACQUAVITA, Library Technician 
*LORRAINE C. BURKE, Library Technician 
*ULMA S. FAULKNER, Library Technician 
*ANNA L. HOHL, Library Technician 



ADMINISTRATION 



159 



Office of Equal Opportunity 

CAROLE AIKEN, B.A., M.A. Director 

Personnel Office 

JAMES H. SHATTUCK, B.S., B.A., Director 
GEORGIANNE DeMAlO, Secretary 

Public Relations 

THORNTON SMALLWOOD, A.B., Director 
JOSEPH J. CIEPLAK, B.S., Assistant Director 
ELIZABETH T. BENNEH, Staff Assistant 
CAROL A. HUBBARD, B.J., Staff Assistant 

Security 

JAMES P. KUPSTAS, B.A., A.B., Director 



Services 

MARGARET BUCK, Receptionist 
FRANCES ERBA, Secretary, Student Council 
STEPHANIE MAGLIOLA, Switchboard Operator 
THURMAN FREEMAN, Mail 
*DAVID GRALNICK, Mail 
*EARL WALKER, Mail 
LEO PACQUETTE, Locker Rooms 
*CELIA DiNELLO, Clerical and Duplication 
*ROSEMARIE GIANNOTTI, Clerical and Duplication 
*MARY YURCZK, Clerical and Duplication 



'Indicates part-time 




160 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



ALUMNI ADVISORY COUNCIL 



JOHN A. FREY, '44, Chairman 
President and General Manager 
Hershey Metal Products, Inc. 
Ansonia, Connecticut 

ELIZABETH G. CURREN, '68, Vice Chairman 
Society Editor 
New Haven Register 
New Haven, Connecticut 

LAWRENCE C. PARKER, Secretary 
Director of Alumni Relations 
University of New Haven 

JOHN F. BECKERT, 72 
Asst, Vice President 
Union Trust Company 
New Haven, Connecticut 

GEORGEJ. CONKLING, '35 
Retired 

FREDERICK L CRONAN, '39 
Purchasing Agent 
City of New Haven, Connecticut 

JOHN N. DEMING, '48 

Directory Manager— Business Information 

Systems 
The Southern New England Telephone Co. 

RICHARD DREW, '72 
Avco-Lycoming Division 
Stratford, Connecticut 

JOHN H. DUFFY, '73 

Plant Manager 

Miles Laboratories, Inc. 

West Haven, Connecticut 



JOSEPH F. DUPLINSKY, '41, Chairman 
President 

Connecticut Blue Cross, Inc. 
New Haven, Connecticut 

STANLEY F. DURFEE, '35 

Secretary 

Charles S. Leete Company, Inc. 

New Haven, Connecticut 

LESLIE C. FINDELL, '51 
General Manager 
Wilson Auto Sales Company, Inc. 
Branford, Connecticut 

HERMAN \. GALVIN, '34 

Partner 

Axton-Cross Company 
North Haven, Connecticut 

STANLEY GNIAZDOWSKI, '72 

Digital Equipment Corporation 
Westfield, Massachusetts 

MARTHA G. HARGETT, '70 

11 South East Drive 
New Haven, Connecticut 

PHILLIP KAPLAN 
President 
University of New Haven 

WALTER P. MACAULEY, '37 
Vice President 
Wyatt. Incorporated 
New Haven, Connecticut 

GEORGE I. MORDECAI, '35 

Senior Engineer 

The Southern New England Telephone Co. 

JOHN PERUN, '62 
President 
C-l-B Group 
Woodbridge, Connecticut 



THOMAS B. PETERSON, '52 

Vice President and Controller 
Connecticut Hard Rubber Company 
New Haven, Connecticut 

THOMAS G. PISCITELLI, '52 

Assistant Vice President and Hamden 

Branch Manager 
Union Trust Company 
New Haven, Connecticut 

PHILIP RICCIARDI, '40 

President 

Refractory Metals Electrofinishing Corp. 

White Plains, New York 

ARTHUR J. ROETTING, '36 
President 

Wire Machinery Corp. of America, Inc. 
New Haven, Connecticut 

EUGENE J. ROSAZZA, '39 

Vice President, Finance & Accounting 
The United Illuminating Company 
New Haven, Connecticut 

EDWARD D. TADDEI, '46 

Alumni Rep. to Board of Governors 
Executive Vice President 
Barrows and Wallace Company 
Hartford, Connecticut 

FRANK H. WOODMAN, '47 

Ives Division, Leigh Products Inc. 

50 Ives Place 

New Haven, Connecticut 

CHARLES E. WOODS, '51 

President 

New Haven Water Company 

New Haven, Connecticut 



ADVISORY COUNCILS 



161 



ENGINEERING ADVISORY COUNCIL 



JOHN SALOMON, Chairman 
Superintendent of Production 
United illuminating Company 
New Haven, Connecticut 



RICHARD J. GREET, Secretary 
Coordinator 

Department of Materials Engineering 
University of New Haven 



JOHN L. BANKS 

Senior Staff Engineer 
Avco-Lycoming 
Stratford, Connecticut 



JORN BERG-JOHNSEN, JR. 

Sales Engineer 
Godfrey & Associates 
Hamden, Connecticut 



SAMUEL S. BOARD, JR. 

Engineer, Researcfi and Development 
Farrel Corporation Division U.S.M. 
Ansonia, Connecticut 



The purpose of the Engineer- 
ing Advisory Council is to act in 
an advisory and consultative 
capacity to the Engineering 
Departments of the University. 



ROBERT 0. DISQUE 

Chief Engineer 

American Institute of Steel Construction, 

Inc. 
New York, New York 



CLARENCE W. DUNHAM 

Assoc. Prof., Civil Engineering Emeritus 

Yale University 

New Haven, Connecticut 



FRANK GEISSLER 

Engineering Manager 
Cramer Div. of Conrac 
Old Saybrook, Connecticut 



GERALD J. KIRWIN 
Chairman 

Electrical Engineering Department 
University of New Haven 

CONSTANTINE C. LAMBRAKIS 

Chairman 

Mechanical Engineering Department 

University of New Haven 

ROBERT L. LONG 

Manager — Engineering 
Miles Laboratories, Inc. 
West Haven, Connecticut 



VINCENT MACONI 
Secretary-Treasurer 
Maconi Construction Company 
Hamden, Connecticut 



JOHN C. MARTIN 
Chairman 

Department of Civil Engineering 
University of New Haven 

GEORGE A. MEINSEN 

Manager, Industrial Engineering 
International Silver Company 
Meriden, Connecticut 



FRANCIS J. COSTELLO 
Chairman 

Department of Industrial Engineering 
University of New Haven 



LAWRENCE B. GREW 
Professional Engineer 
New Haven, Connecticut 



KENNETH E. NEFF 

Manager of Engineering 
The H. Wales Lines Co. 
Meriden, Connecticut 



HUGH COX 

Vice President-General Manager 
Raymond Engineering 
Middletown, Connecticut 



ROBERT F. HASLER 

Chief Engineer 
American Cyanamid Co. 
Wallingford, Connecticut 



J. OTTENHEIMER 

Director, Engineering 
Armstrong Rubber Company 
New Haven, Connecticut 



162 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



ENGINEERING ADVISORY COUNCIL — cont'd 



HOWARD SAWATZKI 
Vice President 

Bigelow Superior Industries, Inc. 
New Haven, Connecticut 

NORBERT E. SMYTH 

Manager of Nuclear Engineering Analysis 
Electric Boat Division of General 

Dynamics 
Groton, Connecticut 

ALEXIS N. SOMMERS 
Provost 
University of New Haven 



RALPH A. SPANG 

City Engineer 

City of West Haven, Connecticut 

RUSSELL G. WARNER, JR. 

Manager of Manufacturing 
C. Cowles & Company 
New Haven, Connecticut 

THOMAS C. WARNER, JR. 
Dean 

School of Engineering 
University of New Haven 



JACK F. WEIFFENBACH 

Vice President 

Researcti and Engineering 

Olin Corporation 

New Haven, Connecticut 

FRANK E. WOLLENSACK 

General Manager of Engineering 
Southern New England Telephone Co. 
New Haven, Connecticut 

FELIX ZWEIG 

Professor of Engineering and Applied 

Science 
Yale University 
New Haven, Connecticut 



HOTEL AND RESTAURANT ADVISORY COUNCIL 



JOSEPH AMENDOLA 

Vice President 

The Culinary Institute of America Inc. 

Hyde Park, New York 

LOUIS BARTENBACH 
Research Chef 
General Foods Corporation 
Tarrytown, New York 

BETTY BENTZ 
Co-Administrator 
New York Hotel and Motel Trades Council 

& Hotel Association 
New York, New York 

SALVATORE CALANESE 
Educational Director ITP 
New York Hotel and Motel Trades 

Council & Hotel Association 
New York, New York 



ROBERT V. CANNING 
Vice President 
Connecticut Steel Company 
New Haven, Connecticut 

EDWARD DREW 
Manager 

Quinnipiack Club 
New Haven, Connecticut 

ALFRED GOLDSMID 

Consultant 

New Haven, Connecticut 

DR. DORIS JOHNSON 
Director of Dietetics 
Yale-New Haven Hospital 
New Haven, Connecticut 

ROBERT MEYER, JR. 
Yankee Silversmith Inn 
Wallingford, Connecticut 



ARNO B. SCHMIDT 

Executive Chef 
The Wfaldorf-Astoria 
New York, New York 

FRED A. SMITH 
Director 

Saga Food Service 
University of Vermont 
Burlington, Vermont 

JOSEPH P. TONETTI 

Manager 
Somerset Club 
Boston, Massachusetts 

BROTHER HERMAN E. ZACCARELLI, C.S.C. 
International Director 
Food Research Center for Religious 

Institutions 
North Easton, Massachusetts 



ADVISORY COUNCILS 



163 



MANAGEMENT CENTER ADVISORY COUNCIL 



GEOFFREY ETHERINGTON, Chairman 

President 

Marblette Corporation 

Madison, Connecticut 

WARREN SMITH, Secretary 

Acting Director 
IVIanagement Center 
University of New Haven 

CHARLES J, ANDERSON 

President, First Federal Savings and Loan 

Association of New Haven 
New Haven, Connecticut 

ALEXANDER S. BASIL 

Vice President 

Cerro Wire and Cable Division 

Cerro Corporation 
New Haven, Connecticut 



WALTER J. COLEMAN 

Manager of Industrial and Community 

Affairs 
New Haven Chamber of Commerce 
New Haven, Connecticut 

THOMAS E. GUNNOUD, JR. 

Personnel and Training Administrator 
The Anaconda American Brass Company 
Waterbury, Connecticut 

JAMES HAURY 

Assistant General Foreman 
Parrel Company 
Division of USM Corporation 
Ansonia, Connecticut 



PHILLIP S. KAPLAN 
President 
University of New Haven 



ANN M, MASSIMINO 
Training Director 
United Illuminating Company 
New Haven, Connecticut 

WILLIAM J. McGONAGIL 

General Manager 

Joseph T. Ryerson and Son, Inc. 

Wallingford, Connecticut 

CHARLES J. SOBOLEWSKI 

Vice President and General Manager 
Winchester Western Division 

Olin Corporation 
New Haven, Connecticut 

ROBERT W. STOUGHTON 
Personnel Supervisor 
B. F, Goodrich Sponge Products 
Division of B, F. Goodrich Company 
Shelton, Connecticut 



164 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



NEW PRODUCTS AND CONCEPTS LABORATORY 
ADVISORY COUNCIL 



J. CLARKE MATTIMORE, Director 

New Products and Concepts Laboratory 

University of New Haven 

Vice President (Retired) 

Time, Inc. 

Vice Ctiairman 

SAM! 

DAVID BRUMBAUGH 

Executive Vice-President (Retired) 
Time, Inc. 

DAVID CULBERTSON 
President 

Xerox Education Group 
Xerox Corporation 

GEORGES DIDISHEIM 

Ctiairman of Board 
V^altham Watcti Company 

JOSEPH FAHEY, JR. 
President 
State National Bank 

PAUL GARRITY 
President 
Garrity Industries 



TED GORDON 
President 
The Futures Group 

JEROME S. HARDY 
President 
Dreyfus Funds 

ANDERSON S. HEWITT 
Consultant 

Founder of Hewitt, Ogiivy, Benson and 
Mather Agency 

JAMES LYNCH 
Vice-President 
Associated Merchandising Corporation 

CLARENCE (BUD) MACNELLY 
Portrait Artist 
Former publisher of the 
Saturday Evening Post 

CHARLES MAPES 

President 
COMPLAN 

WILLIAM OGDEN 

Executive Vice-President 
Chase-Manhattan Bank 



THEODORE J. OLSEN 

Vice-President for Administration 
Olin Corporation 

FRED PAPERT 

Chairman of Board 

PKL Companies, Inc. 

Founder of Papert, Koenig, and Lois 

Advertising Agency 

H. FORD PERINE 

President 

Brand Names Foundation 

FRANK RICH 
President 
F. D. Rich Construction Company 

ED SMITH 
President 
Threshold Technology, Inc. 

SYLVESTER (PAT) WEAVER 
Communications Consultant 
Former Chairman of Board, NBC 



ADVISORY COUNCILS 



165 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION ADVISORY COUNCIL 



JAMES COLLETT, Chairman 

Connecticut Development Commission 
Hamden, Connecticut 
Area Development Consultant 
United Illuminating Company 

JOSEPH A. PARKER, Secretary 

Dean 

Graduate School 

University of New Haven 

ROBERT H. FRANKLIN 
Executive Director 
Connecticut Public Expenditure 

Council, Inc. 
Hartford, Connecticut 

CLARENCE F. HEIMANN 
President 

Connecticut Conference of Mayors 
1st Selectman 
Trumbull, Connecticut 

PHILLIP S. KAPLAN 
President 
University of New Haven 



FRANCIS J. KELLY 

Controller 

City of New Haven 

New Haven, Connecticut 

JOSEPH L LIEBERMAN 

Attorney 

State Senator 11th District 

New Haven, Connecticut 

JUSTIN F. MANNING 
Chairman 
New Haven Central Labor Council 

Education Committee 
Office and Professional Employees 

International Union 
American Federation of Labor and 

Congress of Industrial Organizations 

and Canadian Labor Congress 
West Haven, Connecticut 

NATHANIEL W. MORROW 

Member, Personnel Policy Board 

State of Connecticut 
New Britain, Connecticut 



SAMUEL W. PINE 

Raymond, Parish and Pine, 

Urban Planners 

West Haven, Connecticut 



Inc. 



WILLIAM J. REYNOLDS 

Vice President 

Municipal Finance Department 

Hartford National Bank and Trust Company 

Hartford, Connecticut 

DENNIS REZENDES 
President 

Community Research and 
Development Corporation 
Hartford, Connecticut 

BELDEN H. SCHAFFER 
Director 

The Institute ot Public Service 
University of Connecticut 
Storrs, Connecticut 

EDWARD SIMPSON 

Personnel Commissioner 
State of Connecticut 
Hartford, Connecticut 

CLIFFORD VERMILYA 

Town Manager, Bloomfield, Connecticut 
President, Town and City Manager's 

Association 
Bloomfield, Connecticut 



166 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



SOCIAL WELFARE ADVISORY COUNCIL 



FAITH H. EIKAAS, Chairman 
Chairman 

Department of Sociology & Social Welfare 
University of New Haven 

CLAIRE GALLANT 

State Department of Education 
State Office Building 
Hartford, Connecticut 

MICHAEL WYNNE 
Coordinator 

Social Welfare Concentration 
University of New Haven 

HAYWOOD HOOKS 

Human Relations Council of 
Greater New Haven 
New Haven, Connecticut 

PAULINE LANG 

Director of Division of Social Work 
Southern Connecticut State College 
New Haven, Connecticut 



HERMAN H. LEVY 
Attorney at Law 
New Haven, Connecticut 

VIRGINIA LITTLE, A,C.S.W. 

Chairman of Committee of Undergraduate 

Education 
University of Connecticut 
School of Social Work 
West Hartford, Connecticut 

HARVEY MIDDLETON 

West Haven School System 
West Haven, Connecticut 

DREW MORSE 
Student 

Social Welfare Concentration 
University of New Haven 



DOUGLAS ROBILLARD 
Dean 

School of Arts and Sciences 
University of New Haven 

SIDNEY SILVERBERG 

Director (Retired) 

West Haven Community Center 

West Haven, Connecticut 

ALEXIS N. SOMMERS 

Provost 

University of New Haven 

GARY TISCHLER, M.D. 

Connecticut Mental Health Center 
New Haven, Connecticut 

SUSAN UZAN 
Coordinator 

Human Services Curriculum 
Norwalk Community College 



ADVISORY COUNCILS 



167 



WNHU ADVISORY COUNCIL 



JOSEPH J. CIEPLAK, Co-chairman 
Assistant Director of Public Relations 
University of New Haven 



CARL GRANDE 

General Manager, WNHC 
New Haven, Connecticut 



VINNY ROBERTS 

General Manager, WFIF 
Milford, Connecticut 



JAMES DULL, Co-chairman 
Assistant Professor 
Political Science Department 
University of New Haven 
Radio Commentator 
New Haven, Connecticut 

ROBERT E. RUSSO 
Chief Engineer, WNHU 
University of New Haven 

EDWARD J. DREW, JR. 
Chairman 

Communications Board 
University of New Haven 

RICHARD L. GELGAUDA 

General Manager, WNHU 
University of New Haven 

JOHN W. GHOREYEB 
Dean of Students 
University of New Haven 



SUSAN GRANGER 

Professional Broadcaster and Writer 
New Haven. Connecticut 

ROBERT HERPE 

General Manager, WPLR 
New Haven, Connecticut 

GERALD J. KIRWIN 
Chairman 

Electrical Engineering Department 
University of New Haven 

FRANK iVIOORE 

General Manager, WELI 
New Haven, Connecticut 

AL PELLEGRINO 

General Manager, WKCI 
Hamden. Connecticut 



TED QUAYLE 

General Manager, WCDQ 
Hamden, Connecticut 



SHIRLEE SCHAFFER 

Commentator and Writer, WELI 
New Haven, Connecticut 
Member of the Board of Governors 
University of New Haven 

RICHARD P. SCHUMEYER, JR. 
Chief Engineer, WAVZ 
New Haven, Connecticut 

GEORGE R. TIERNAN 
Attorney 

New Haven, Connecticut 
Secretary of the Board of Governors 
University of New Haven 

LAUREL VLOCK 

Television Producer 
New Haven, Connecticut 



Faculty Organization 



General Committee: 

Chairman of the Faculty 

Secretary of the Faculty 

Chairman, Board of Faculty Welfare 

Faculty Senate: 

Chairman 

Vice Chairman 

Secretary 

Chairmen of Senate Committees: 

Academic Standards 

Commencement and Convocations 

Curriculum 

Faculty-Student Relations 

Instruction 

Non-Academic Affairs 

Board of Faculty Welfare: 

Chairman 
Secretary 

Sabbatical Leave Committee 

Chairman 

Tenure and Promotion Committee 

Chairman 

Secretary to the Faculty 



Stephen Grodzinsky 

Gwendolyn E. Jensen 

Henry E. Voegeli 

Stephen Grodzinsky 

Joseph A. Machnik 

Gwendolyn E. Jensen 

Walter 0. Jewell, III 

Dinwiddle C. Reams, Jr. 

Buddy B. Saleeby 

Donald Wynschenk 

Edward Astarita 

Joseph A. Machnik 

Henry E. Voegeli 
Darrell W. Horning 

Bernard Wiener 



Henry E. Voegeli 
Mary A. DuPaul 



FACULTY 



169 



FACULTY 1974-75 



Arnold, Joseph J., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 
B.S.. M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 

Astarita, Edward, Assistant Professor, Hotel Management 
B.S., New York University; M.S., Columbia University 

Beeken, Ramona, Assistant Professor, English 

B.S., Southern Connecticut State College; M.A., Trinity College 

Bell, Srilekha, Assistant Professor. English 

B.A., M.A., University of Madras; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin 

Berglund, Jerry W., Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., Cooper Union; M.S., Columbia University; Ph.D., Polytechnic 

of Brooklyn 

Bernard, Joseph F., Jr., Assistant Professor, History 

A.B., Loyola University; M.A., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Yale 
University 

Blaskey, Joel W., Instructor, Science and Biology 

B.A., Southern Connecticut State College, M.A., Fairfield University 
M.S., University of Bridgeport 

Bradshaw, Alfred, Assistant Professor, Sociology 
B.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Brown, David, Professor, Psychology 

B.S., University of Connecticut; M.A., Columbia University 
Consulting Psychologist (Licensed, Conn.) 

Burns, Donald, Assistant Professor, Physical Education 

B.S., University of Connecticut; M.A., Teachers' College, Columbia 
University 

Carriuolo, Ralf E., Assistant Professor, Humanities 
B.A., Yale University; M.M., Harlt College 

Carson, George R., Assistant Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.C.E., City College, New York; M.S.C.E., Columbia University 
Professional Engineer (Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, 

New Jersey) 
Landscape Architect (Connecticut) 

Chandra, Satish, Associate Professor, International Business 

B.A., University of Delhi; M.A., Delhi School of Economics; LL.B., 
Lucknow Law School, India; LL.M., J.S.D., Yale University 



Chepaitis, Joseph, Associate Professor, History 

A.B., Loyola College; M.A., Ph.D., Georgetown University 

Chun, Kee W., Professor, Physics 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania; A.M., Princeton University; Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania 

Clifford, Frank M., Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S-, University of Bridgeport; M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Cole, Carroll P., Associate Professor, English 

B.A., Principia College; M.A., The Johns Hopkins University; M.F.A., 
D.F.A., Yale University 

Coleman, John, Assistant Professor, Management 

B.S.E., University of Connecticut; M.S.I. E. University of Massachu- 
setts 

Collinson, John, Professor, Humanities 

A.B., The Johns Hopkins University; A.M., Harvard University; Ph.D., 
The Johns Hopkins University 

Costello, Francis J., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 
B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E., Newark College of Engineering 

Courtney, Dennis, Assistant Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Wayne State University; Ph.D., University of Ohio 
Consulting Psychologist (Licensed, Connecticut) 

Deslo, Peter J., Associate Professor, Chemistry 

B.S., Boston College; Ph.D., University of New Hampshire 

DInegar, Caroline, Professor, Political Science 

B.A,, Cornell University; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University (leave of 
absence) 

Dull, James, Assistant Professor, Political Science 

B.A., Wilkes College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania 

Eikaas, Faith H., Professor, Sociology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University (on sabbatical) 

Ellison, Jerome, Professor, English 

B.A., University of Michigan; M.S., Southern Connecticut State 
College 

Farrow, William R., Instructor, Physical Education 

B.S., Winston-Salem State University; M.S., Southern Connecticut 
State College 



170 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Ferringer, Natalie, Assistant Professor, Political Science 
B,S-, Temple University; M.A., University of Virginia 

Fidler, Howard, Assistant Professor, Hotel Management 

B.S., New York University; M.B.A., University of New/ Haven 

Flaumenhaft, Frank, Assistant Professor, Management Science 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania; M.B.A., New York University (on 
sabbatical) 

French, Bruce A., Assistant Professor, English 

B.A., University of Missouri; M.A., Western Reserve University; 
M.A., Middlebury College; MA., Harvard University (on sabbatical) 

Gangier, Joseph M., Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., University of Washington; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 

George, Edward T., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., MS, Worcester Polytechnic Institute; D. Engr., Yale University 

Greet, Richard J., Associate Professor, Materials Engineering 

B.E.E., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; M.S., Ph.D., Harvard 
University 

Grodzinsky, Stephen, Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 

S.B., S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Illinois 

Haberman, Ronald A., Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 
B.S.A.E., Pennsylvania State University; M.S.O.R., Florida Institute 
of Technology 

Hale, Graham, Assistant Professor, Physics 

B.S., Ph.D., University College of London University, London, 

England 

Harricharan, Wilfred, Associate Professor, Management Science 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University 

Harrison, Robert D., Assistant Professor, Political Science 
A.B., Amherst; M.A., Columbia; J.D., Yale University 

Hotfnung, Robert J., Associate Professor, Psychology 

A.B., Lafayette College; M.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Cincinnati 

Horning, Darrell W., Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.S.E.E., S.D School of Mines; M.S.E.E., Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Howling, Robert T., Professor, English 

B.A., Rutgers University; M.A., New York University; Ph.D., Penn. 
State University 

Hyman, Arnold, Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Brooklyn College; M.S., City College of New York; 
Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 



Jensen, Gwendolyn E., Associate Professor, History 

B.A., University of Hartford; M.A., Trinity College; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Connecticut 

Jewell, Walter 0., Ill, Associate Professor, Sociology 

A.B., Harvard College; Ph.D., Harvard Graduate School 

Jordan, Camille, Visiting Assistant Professor, English 
A.B., Dillard University; A.M., University of Chicago 

Kalma, Dennis L., Assistant Professor, Science and Biology 
B.A., Knox College; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University 

Kaplan, Nathaniel, Associate Professor, English 

A.B., Randolph-Macon College; MS , Southern Connecticut State 
College 

Kaplan, Phillip S., Professor, Economics 

B.A., University of Massachusetts; M.A., Columbia University; 
Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University 

Karatzas, George, Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A,, Manchester University; M.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Katsaros, Thomas, Professor, History 

B.A., M.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Kirwin, Gerald J., Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.S.. Northeastern University; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology; Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Kravet, Robert, Instructor, Accounting 

B.A., Southern Connecticut State College; B.S., University of New 

Haven; M.S., University of Massachusetts 
C.P.A. (Connecticut) 

Lambrakis, Constantine C, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.E.E., M.S.M.E., University of Bridgeport; Ph.D., Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute 

Lanahan, Roger P., Assistant Professor, Fire Science 
B.A., Queens College 

Lanius, Ross M., Jr., Associate Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.S.C.E., University of Delaware; M.S.C.E., University of Connecticut 

Professional Engineer (Conn.) 

Lemaire, Henry, Associate Professor, Chemistry 

S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., California 
Institute of Technology 

Lobay, Ivan, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

Dipl., Ing., Institute of Technology, Brno, Czechoslovakia; M.E., Cen- 
tral University of Venezuela 
Professional Engineer (Conn.) 



FACUUTY 



171 



Machnik, Joseph A., Associate Professor, Physical Education 
B.S., IVI.S., Long Island University; Ph.D., University of Utah 

Maffeo, Edward J., Assistant Professor, Fine Arts 

B.F.A., Rhode Island School of Design; M.A., Columbia University 

Mailiard, Charles A., Jr., Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

A.B., Southwest Missouri State College; J.D., St. Louis University 

Mandour, Ahmed R., Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A.. American University at Cairo; M.B.A., Ph.D., University of 
Oklahoma 

Mann, Richard A., Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.S., University of Wisconsin; M.S., Northwestern University; Ph.D., 

University of Wisconsin 
Professional Engineer (Wisconsin) 

Marber, Allen S., Associate Professor, Management Science/Operations 
Management 

B.A., Michigan State University; M.B.A., Baruch College; C.U.N.Y., 
M.A., New York University, Ph.D., New York University 

Martin, John C, Professor, Civil Engineering 
B.E., M.E., Yale University 
Professional Engineer (Conn.) 

Marx, Paul, Professor, English 

B.A., University of Michigan; M.F.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., 
New York University 

Mathieu, Bertrand M., Associate Professor, English 
B.A., Nasson College; M.A., University of Arizona 

McGee, Frank, Jr., Assistant Professor, Public Administration 

A.B., Merrimeck College; M.P.A., Maxwell School, Syracuse Univer- 
sity 

Meier, Robert D., Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 
B.S., Ursinus College; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Mentzer, Thomas Lee, Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.S., Penn State University; M.S.. Ph.D., Brown University 

Meyer, John C, Jr., Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., State University of New York, Stony Brook; M.A., State Univer- 
sity of New York, Albany 

Millen, Roger N., Associate Professor, Management Science 

B.S., M.S., University of Massachusetts; Ph.D., Purdue University 

Moffitt, Elizabeth J., Associate Professor, Fine Arts 
B.F.A., Yale University; M.A., Hunter College 

Montague, Richard A., Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., University of New Haven; M.S. I.E.. Columbia University 



Morrison, Richard C, Professor, Physics 

A.B., Princeton University; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University 

Murillo, Robert, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 
B.A., M.A., The University of New Mexico 

Naccarato, David, Assistant Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., St. Mary of the Plains College; M.A., Wichita State University 

Nordlund, Kai K., Associate Professor, Finance 

LL.B., University of Helsinki; LLM., Columbia University; D.J.S., 
New York Law School 

Nyce, William H., Associate Professor, Chemistry 

B.S.Ch.E., University of Pennsylvania; M.S., Southern Connecticut 
State College 

O'Keefe, Daniel, Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.E.E., City College of New York; M.S.E.E., Carnegie-Mellon Univer- 
sity 

Olgin, Philip, Professor, Education 

B.S., Ed.M., Ed.D., Rutgers University 

Paelet, David, Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.S., M.S., City College of New York; Ph.D. University of Connecti- 
cut 

Parker, Joseph, Professor, Public Administration 

B.A., Lehigh University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 

Parker, L. Craig, Jr., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

A.B., Bates College, M.Ed., Springfield College; Ph.D., State Uni- 
versity of New York at Buffalo 

Petersen, Wlllard, Assistant Professor, Economics 

B.A., Yale University; M.B.A., Tuck School of Business Administra- 
tion, Dartmouth College 

Plotnick, Alan, Professor, Economics 

B.A., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Rajeswaran, Punnusany, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.Sc, University of Ceylon, M.Crim., University of California at 

Berkeley 

Ray, Garo W., Executive-in-Residence 

Engineering Certificate, Robert College; Consulting Engineer, FCC 
Professional Engineer (Conn.) 

Reams, Dinwiddle C, Jr., Associate Professor, Science and Biology 
B.Ch.E., University of Virginia; M.Eng., D.Eng., Yale University 

Reimer, Richard, Associate Professor, Accounting 

B.B.A., University of Commerce, Vienna; M.S., Columbia University 
C.P.A. (Conn.) (on sabbatical) 



172 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Rich, Anne, Instructor, Accounting 

B A., Queens College; M.B.A. University of Bridgeport 

C.P A,, (Conn.) 

Robillard, Douglas, Professor, Englisii 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Wayne State University 

Robin, Gerald D., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Ross, Bertram, Associate Professor, Mathematics 

IVl.S., Wilkes College; M.S.. Ph.D., Courant Institute of Mathematical 

Sciences, New York University 
Professional Engineer (New York, Ohio) 

Sack, Allen, Assistant Professor, Sociology 

B.A., University of Notre Dame; M.A., Ph.D., Penn State University 

Saleeby, Buddy B., Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.M.E., Cooper Union; M.A.M.E., Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Sandman, Joshua, Assistant Professor, Political Science 
B.A., M.A., New York University 

Sawhney, Shiv. L., Associate Professor, Marketing & International Busi- 
ness 
B.A., LL.B.. Delhi University; M.B.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Scholl, William L., Associate Professor, Humanities 

B.A., Davidson College; M.Div., Union Theological Seminary 

Sherwood, Franklin B., Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., M.A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Sllbert, Louis, Assistant Professor. Management Science 
B.S., M.B.A., University of Hartford 

Smith, Donald M., Assistant Professor, English 

A.B.. Guilford College; A.M., Columbia University 

Smith, Warren J., Associate Professor, Business Administfation 
B.S., University of Connecticut; M.B.A. , Northeastern University 

Sommers, Alexis N., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.M.E., Cornell University; M.S., Rutgers University; Ph.D., Purdue 
University 

Stanley, Richard M., Associate Professor, Mathematics 

B.E.S., The Johns Hopkins University; M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale 
University 

Staugaard, Burton C, Associate Professor, Science and Biology 

A.B., Brown University; M.S., University of Rhode Island; Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut 

Stevenson, Kay G., Assistant Professor, English 

B.A., Agnes Scott College; M.A., University of California; Ph.D., 

Yale University (on leave of absence) 

Surti, Kantilal K., Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.E., University of Gujarat, India; M.E.E., University of Delaware; 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 



Teluk, John, Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., Graduate School of Economics, Munich; B.S., University of 
New Haven, M.A., Free University, Munich 
Theilman, Ward, Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A,, Ph.D , University of Illinois (on leave of absence) 
Tyndall, Bruce, Associate Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., M.S., University of Iowa 

Vasileff, Henry D., Associate Professor, Finance 

B.A., M.A.. University of Toronto; M.B.A., University of Connecticut; 
Ph.D., University of Toronto 
Vieira, Florlndo, Assistant Professor, Physical Education 

B.S., Quinnipiac College; M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 

Voegeli, Henry E., Assistant Professor, Science and Biology 

B.A.. University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Rhode Island 

Warner, Thomas C., Jr., Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.E., Yale University; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Professional Engineer (Conn.) 

Wentworth, Ronald N., Assistant Professor, Management 

B.S.M.E., Northeastern University, M.S. I.E., University of Massa- 
chusetts 

White, William, Instructor, Transitic^nal Studies 
B.A., Union College; M.S., Syracuse University 

Whiteman, Gilbert, Associate Professor, Communications 

A.A., LaValley Junior College, B.E., University of Nebraska; M.A., 
University of Oklahoma, Ph.D., Michigan State University 

Wiener, Bernard, Associate Professor, Marketing 
B.S., M.B.A., New York University 

Williams, Jeffrey L., Assistant Professor, Accounting 

B.S., University of New Haven; M.B.A., University of Bridgeport 

Wilson, Ned B., Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 
B.Sc. M.Sc, Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Wright, H. Fessenden, Professor, Science and Biology 
A.B., Oberlin College; M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University 
F.A.I.C, Registered Chemical Consultant 

Wynne, Michael J., Assistant Professor, Sociology 

B.A., Fairfield University; M.S.S.A., Case Western Reserve 

Wynschenk, Donald, Assistant Professor, Health and Physical Education 
B.S., M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 

Yanover, Ruth W., Associate Professor, Marketing 
B.A., M.A., University of Wisconsin 

Zern, Martin M., Assistant Professor, Accounting 

B.S., New York University; LL.B. Brooklyn Law School; LL.M., New 
York University 

C.P.A. (New York) 
Zingale, Paul, Assistant Professor, Management 

B.A., University of Rochester; M.A., University of Minnesota 



INDEX 



173 



INDEX 



Academic Calendar 
Academic Scholarships 
Academic Standards 
Accident Insurance 

Accounting Courses, Desc 

Accounting Major 

Accreditations and Memberships. 
Administration, Officers, and Staff 
Admission 



Procedure 

Transfers 

Advanced Placement 

Advanced Study 

Advisory Councils 

Aid Applications 

Alumni Association 

Advisory Council 
Advisory Council Membership 

American Studies 

Application Forms 

Art Courses, Desc. 

Art Major 

Arts and Sciences, School of 



Admission Requirements 

Associate Degree 

Majors 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Commercial and Advertising 
General Studies 
Journalism 

Bachelor Degree 



Art 



Areas of Study 
American Studies 
Anthropology 
Art 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Economics 

English 

Environmental Studies 

Fire Science 

History 

Legal Affairs 

Mathematics 



. 6 
. 29 

14 

34 

. 95 

. 60 

9 

155 

10 

. 12 

. 14 

10 

16 

160 

.. 29 

.. 26 

26 
160 
39 
179 
96 
39 
37 
38 
53 



53, 55 

53, 55 

53, 56 

54, 56 
54, 57 

39 



39 
39 

39 

40 

40 

41 
44 
45 
42-44 
46 
49 
46 



Occupational Safety and Health 

Philosophy 
Physics 

Political Science 
Psychology 
Public Affairs 

Sociology 

Social Welfare 

Teacher Education 

World Music 

Core Requirements 
Freshman Year Program 

Matriculation 

Minors 



Associate Degree Programs 
Arts and Sciences 
Business Administration 
Engineering 

Athletic Activities 

Attendance Regulations 

Awards and Scholarships 

Biology Courses, Desc. 
Biology Major 

Black Student Affairs 

Board of Governors 

Bookstore 

Bursary Work 

Business Administration, School of 

Areas of Study 
Accounting 

Business Administration 
Communications 
Criminal Justice 

Correctional Administration 

Forensic Science 

Law Enforcement 

Economics 

Finance 

Hotel Administration 

International Business 

Management Science 

Marketing 

Operations Management 

Personnel Management 



46 
48 
48 
48 
49 
49 
49 
50 
50 
51 

51 
52 
39 
38 

53 
75 
85 

26 
17 
29 



141 

40, 53, 55 

27 

153 
35 
33 
59 



60, 72, 77 
60, 64, 67 
60, 71 
61 
73 
74 
75 

.60, 63, 68 

60, 69 

60, 76 

60, 69 

61, 70 

61, 66 

61, 66 

61, 67 



174 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Public Administration 
Retailing 

Cooperative Program In Economics 

Core Courses 

Minors 



Cafeteria 

Calendar, Academic 
Career Development 
Certification. Teactier 
Ctianges in Arrangements 
Changes in Registration 
Ctiemistry Courses, Desc. 
Chemistry Major 
Civil Engineering Courses, Desc. 
Civil Engineering Program 
College Level Examination Program.. 
Clubs and Organizations 
College Work-Study 
Commercial and Advertising Art 
Communication Courses, Desc, 
Communications Major 

Counseling and Testing 

Course Changes 

Courses, Desc. 



Accounting 

Art 

Biology and Science 

Business Law 

Chemistry 

Civil Engineering 

Communications 

Criminal Justice 

Economics 

Electrical Engineering . 

Engineering Science 

English 

Finance 

Fire Science 

Foreign Languages 

History 

Hotel Administration 

Industrial Engineering 

International Business 

Journalism 

Management Science 

Marketing 

Materials Engineering 
Mathematics 
Mechanical Engineering 
Music, World 
Philosophy 



61, 78 
61, 79 

63 
65 
64 

35 
6 

28 

50 

23 

12 

98 

40 

100 

83 

10 

35 

33 

53, 56 

102 

60, 71 

28-29 

22 

95 

95 
96 
141 
98 
98 
100 
102 
103 
105 
106 
108 
109 
111 
112 
113 
113 
117 
118 

121 

122 

122 

124 
129 

124 

127 

150 

130 



Physical Education 131 

Physics 132 

Political Science , 134 

Psychology 138 

Public Administration 139 

Quantitative Analysis 140 

Retailing 140 

Science and Biology 141 

Sociology and Social Welfare 146 

Teacher Education 149 

Theater Arts 150 

World Music 151 

Courses at Other Colleges 18 

Crediting Examinations H, 62 

Credit Programs 7 

Criminal Justice Courses, Desc. 103 

Criminal Justice, Majors 61, 73-75 

Cultural Activities 35 

Dean's List 15 

Degrees, Requirements for 15 

With Honors 15, 16 

Dismissal 14 

Division of Special Studies 9 

Divisions of the University 7 

Graduate School 8 

Management Center 9 

Special Studies 9 

Summer School 19 

Undergraduate Credit Programs 7 

Day 7 

Evening 8 

Donor Scholarships 29 

Double Major 18 

Economics, Cooperative Program with SCSC 63 

Economics Courses, Desc. 105 

Economics Major 60, 68 

Education, Teacher 50 

Electrical Engineering Courses, Desc 106 

Electrical Engineering Program 83, 89 

Employment, Student 33 

Engineering Advisory Council 161 

Engineering, School of 81 

Admissions Requirements 82 

Aeronautical Technology 85 

Associate Degree 85 

Bachelor Degree 82, 87 

Civil 83, 88 

Computer Technology 85, 93 

Electrical 83, 89 



INDEX 



175 



Industrial 84, 90 

Materials 84, 91 

Mechanical 85, 92 

Common Freshman Year 87 

Interdisciplinary Programs 86 

Matriculation 82 

Professional Accreditation 82 

English Courses, Desc. 109 

English Major • 44 

Evening Programs 8 

Expenses 20-21 

Faculty 169 

Organization 168 

Fees 20-22 

Finance Major 60, 69 

Financial Aid 29-33 

Fire Science Major 42-44 

FM Radio Station, WNHU 35 

Foreign Languages, Course Desc. 113 

Foreign Language Requirements, Arts and Sciences 45 

Foreign Student Adviser 27 

Fraternities and Sororities 35 

General Studies Major 54, 56 

Grade Reports 13 

Grading System 13 

Graduate School 8 

Grants 31 

Health and Accident Insurance 34 

History Courses, Desc 113 

History Major 46 

History of the University 4 

Honors, Academic 15, 16 
Hotel and Restaurant Administration 

Advisory Council 162 

Courses, Desc. 117 

Major 60, 76 

Housing 33, 34 

Industrial Engineering Cour'ses, Desc 118 

Industrial Engineering 84, 90 

Infirmary 34 

Insurance 34 

International Business Courses, Desc. 121 

International Business Major 60, 69 

Interdisciplinary Program • 18 

Intersession Program 18 

Journalism Courses, Desc 122 

Journalism Major 54, 57 



Law Enforcement Assistance 32 

Library 27 

Loan Funds 32 

Management Center 9 

Advisory Council 163 

Management Science Courses, Desc. 122 

Management Science Major 61, 70 

Marketing Courses, Desc. 124 

Marketing Major 61, 66 

Materials Engineering Courses, Desc. 129 

Materials Engineering Major 84, 91 

Mathematics Courses, Desc. 124 

Mathematics Major 46 

Meal Plans 22 

Mechanical Engineering Courses, Desc 127 

Mechanical Engineering Program 85, 92 

Minors 

Arts and Sciences 38 

Business Administration 64 

Music Courses, Desc. 150 

New Products and Concepts Laboratory 

Advisory Council 164 

Non-Credit Programs 9 



Off-Campus Housing 
On-Campus Housing 
Operations Management Major 
Organizations and Clubs 



34 

33 

61, 66 

35 



Payment of Bills 22 

Philosophy Courses, Desc. 130 

Philosophy Major 48 

Physical Education Courses, Desc. 131 

Physical Examination 34 

Physics Courses, Desc. 132 

Physics Major 48 

Placement Service 28 

Political Science Courses, Desc. 134 

Political Science Major 48 

Pre-Professional Programs H 

Probation 14 

Program Change 22 

Psychology Courses, Desc. 138 

Psychology Major 49 

Public Administration 61, 78 

Course Descriptions 139 

Advisory Council 165 

Publications, Student 35 



Quantitative Analysis Courses, Desc. 



140 



176 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Radio Station, WNHLI 

Readmission 

Refunds 

Registration 
Degree Students 
Non-Degree Students 

Registration Changes 

Requirements for Degrees 

Residence 

Residence Charges 

Retaihng Courses, Desc. 

Retailing Major 



Schedule Changes 
Scholarships 
Scholastic Regulations 

Academic Standards 

Advanced Study 

Associate in Science Degree with Honors 

Attendance Regulations 

Bachelor Degrees with Honors 

Courses Available at other Colleges 

Dean's List 

Degrees 

Dismissal 

Grade Reports 

Grading System 

Honors 

Probation 

Readmission ^ 

Transfer of Credit 

Transfer Students 

Science and Biology Courses, Desc. 

Social Activities 

Social Welfare Advisory Council 

Social Welfare Major 

Sociology and Social Welfare Courses, Desc. 

Sociology Major 



35 

15 

22-23 

12, 19 
12 
12 
12 

15, 16 

33, 34 

21 

140 

61. 79 



12 
29 
13 
14 
16 
16 
17 
16 
18 
15 
15 
14 
13 
13 
15 
14 
15 
17 
14 



141 
35 

166 
50 

146 
49 



Sororities and Fraternities 
Special Studies, Division of 
Special Committees 
Standing Committees 
Student Activities 
Student Center 
Student Councils 
Student Employment 
Student Health Service 
Student Housing 
Student Publications 
Student Services 
Summer Sessions 
Registration 

Teacher Education 

Testing 

Theater Arts Courses, Desc. 

Transfer Students 

Transferability of Credit 

Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 



Undergraduate Credit Programs 
Undergraduate Schools 

Arts and Sciences 

Business Administration 

Course Descriptions 

Engineering 

Veterans Affairs 

Withdrawal 

WNHU Advisory Council 

WNHU, FM Radio Station 

Women's Affairs 

Work Study Program 

World Music Courses, Desc. 

World Music Major 



35 

9 

154 

154, 155 

34, 35 

35 

34 

33 

34 

33, 34 

35 
27 
19 
19 

50 

29 

150 

14, 17 
17 

20, 21 



7 

37 
59 
95 
81 

28 

22, 23 

167 

35 

28 

33 

150 

51 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



1. Main Building 

2. Staff, Faculty and Visitor Parking 

3. Admissions and Counseling 

4. Engineering - Science Building 

5. Student Center and Cafeteria 

6. Book Store 

7. Administration Building (Gate House) 

8. Residence 

9. Business Administration Building 

10. Library 

11. Physical Education -Auditorium Building 



<^ 




FROM 
WATERBURr 



MAIN ROUTES TO THE 
UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



FROM 
^MERIOEN 



I nil II iiiiTL 



FROM 
BRIDGEPORT 




I Heavy lines nnfli bcsl routes to the cjmpus 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 

300 Orange Avenue 

West Haven, Connecticut 06516 

Telephone (203) 9,34-6321 

APPUCATION FOR ADMISSION - DAY DIVISION 



(PRINT OR TYPE) 

Date 

Name 



19 Male Female Sel. Serv. No. 
Soc. Sec. No. 



Last 



Firat 



Middle 



Address Td. No 

No. Street City State Zip Code 

Birthplace Age Date of Birth 

City State Countiy 

Are you on a permanent resident visa in the U.S.? □ Yes, □ No. Country of Citizenship 

Will you require an F-1 student visa? Yes, □ No. 

For which semester are vou applying: Q Fall Q Spring □ Summer 1st Term Q Summer 2nd Term, Year 



For what program are you applying? 

How did you learn about the University of New Haven? 



List High Schools and All Colleges Attended 


Location (City & State) 


H. S. Course and/or 
College Major 


Dates Attended 


Graduate? 
or Degree 


1 






19 to 19 
19 to 19 




2 






3 

4 




19 to 19 
19 to 19 





NOTE: Failure to list all colleges previously attended constitutes grounds for dismissal. 

Your choice of means for satisfying the admissions tests (Check one): 
n CEEB Scholastic Aptitude Test D American College Testing Program Tests 
□ University of New Haven Tests (Note: Contact University for testing dates. ) 

INSTRUCTIONS FOR APPUCANTS 
Applications may be accepted from high school graduates, seniors anticipating graduation, and students transferring 
from another college with satisfactory grades. 

No action will be taken on any application until the University has received: 

1. The completed application form and the non-refundable $1.5.00 application fee. 

2. The high school academic transcript and the admission test scores. 

3. The college and high school academic transcripts in cases involving transfer students.- 

FORWARDING OF ACADEMIC TRANSCRIPTS TO THE UNIVERSITY IS THE STUDENTS RESPONSIBILITY. 

NOTE — University of New Haven welcomes the apphcations of students from all geographic areas, from public or private 
schools, and from all races, economic levels and religions. 



Repeat full name 

(Last) (Fiist) (Middle) 

If married, give wdfe's maiden name or husband's name Number of Children — if any. . 

Military Service: Branch Rank Dates of Service 

If you wish to appl>' for financial aid, please check here. Q 

If you wish information concerning dormitor)' or off campus housing, please check here. D 

Working experience: Employer CSty Dates Type of Work 

( list present or last job first ) 



Father's name Education Living? 

Occupation Place of occupation 

Mother's name Education living? 

Occupation Place of occupation 

No. of sisters No. of brothers 

Living with mother and father? Yes No If not, list name and address of parent or guardian with whom you live — 

Name 

Address 

(Number) (Street) (City) (State) (Zip) 

After an applicant has been otherwise accepted, he must have a physical examination by his own physician. The University provides the 
medical form for the physician. The University reserves the right to reject an apphcant whose physical examination indicates the necessity of 
limitations in study. 

CERTIFICATE TO BE SIGNED BY APPLICA>rr AND PARENT, GUARDIAN, OR SPONSOR OF MINORS 

In consideration of the imdertaking by the Admissions Office to process this form, the undersigned agree that the infor- 
mation furnished on this Apphcation for Admission form, together with all information and materials of any kind received 
by the Admissions Office from any soiu-ce, or prepared by anyone at its request, shall be completely confidential and shall 
not be disclosed to anyone, including the candidate and his family, except that the Director of Admissions may, for official 
purposes, in his discretion disclose any part or all thereof to such person or persons as he deems advisable. 

I hereby approve the above application and I guarantee the payment of all financial obligations incurred by the appli- 
cant. I further agree and authorize the University of New Haven to pubhsh for public relations purposes my photograph 
or photograph(s) in which I appear. I also further agree to support the administration in upholding the rules and regu- 
lations of the University and in maintaining high standards in all phases of university life. 

" If the applicant is under 18, the applicant and a parent should sign. 

Applicant's Signature Date 

Parents Signature ( Or Guardian's Signature ) 

- Date 



niversiiy or New nave 
300 Orange Ave. 
West Haven, CT 06516 
(203) 934-6321